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Thread: Crisping Up Pickled Veggies

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Crisping Up Pickled Veggies

    I bought a big gallon-sized jar of pickled vegetables at the
    Mediterranean market around Christmas: cukes, 5 types of peppers, 2
    types of green tomatoes, cauliflower, baby corn, and maybe some
    other stuff I haven't discovered yet. I get on these "pickled
    kicks" fairly often. And the gallon sized jar looked really good
    that day.

    They're too soft and mushy, except for the tomatoes, which are my
    least favorite. Is there any way to crisp them back up? Would
    Pickle Crisp or alum work after the fact?

    If not, what's a good use for these - puvlerize and use as a
    sandwich spread? It would only be $7.69 down the drain.

    -sw

  2. #2
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Crisping Up Pickled Veggies

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I bought a big gallon-sized jar of pickled vegetables at the
    > Mediterranean market around Christmas: cukes, 5 types of peppers, 2
    > types of green tomatoes, cauliflower, baby corn, and maybe some
    > other stuff I haven't discovered yet. I get on these "pickled
    > kicks" fairly often. And the gallon sized jar looked really good
    > that day.
    >
    > They're too soft and mushy, except for the tomatoes, which are my
    > least favorite. Is there any way to crisp them back up? Would
    > Pickle Crisp or alum work after the fact?
    >
    > If not, what's a good use for these - puvlerize and use as a
    > sandwich spread? It would only be $7.69 down the drain.
    >
    > -sw


    Good question; I've never heard of using a crisping agent like the ones
    you mention after the fact. Sandwich spread doesn't sound bad. Or
    drain them, reduce (some of) the syrup they were packed in, chop or
    grind the vegetables and recombine with the (hopefully) thickened syrup
    to use as a relish. I'd probaably pick out the corn before grinding,
    but YMMV.

    A gallon is a lot.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Gumbo 3-11-2010

  3. #3
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Crisping Up Pickled Veggies

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 12:36:56 -0800, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >> They're too soft and mushy, except for the tomatoes, which are my
    >> least favorite. Is there any way to crisp them back up? Would
    >> Pickle Crisp or alum work after the fact?

    >
    >I don't know if this would work, but soaking in
    >pure water might help. Pickled vegetables have
    >a lot of salt, and the water should tend to be
    >drawn into the vegetables to dilute that salt.
    >That might make them crispier.


    Save the gallon jar and next time pickle ones own veggies, to whatever
    degree and flavor one wants... will be a much better product and will
    probably cost less too because much of the price of store bought is
    in that jar.

  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Crisping Up Pickled Veggies

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > They're too soft and mushy, except for the tomatoes, which are my
    > least favorite. Is there any way to crisp them back up? Would
    > Pickle Crisp or alum work after the fact?


    I don't know if this would work, but soaking in
    pure water might help. Pickled vegetables have
    a lot of salt, and the water should tend to be
    drawn into the vegetables to dilute that salt.
    That might make them crispier.

  5. #5
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Crisping Up Pickled Veggies

    Barb wrote:

    >> I bought a big gallon-sized jar of pickled vegetables at the
    >> Mediterranean market around Christmas: cukes, 5 types of peppers, 2
    >> types of green tomatoes, cauliflower, baby corn, and maybe some
    >> other stuff I haven't discovered yet. I get on these "pickled
    >> kicks" fairly often. And the gallon sized jar looked really good
    >> that day.
    >>
    >> They're too soft and mushy, except for the tomatoes, which are my
    >> least favorite. Is there any way to crisp them back up? Would
    >> Pickle Crisp or alum work after the fact?
    >>
    >> If not, what's a good use for these - puvlerize and use as a
    >> sandwich spread? It would only be $7.69 down the drain.
    >>

    >
    > Good question; I've never heard of using a crisping agent like the ones
    > you mention after the fact. Sandwich spread doesn't sound bad. Or
    > drain them, reduce (some of) the syrup they were packed in, chop or
    > grind the vegetables and recombine with the (hopefully) thickened syrup
    > to use as a relish. I'd probaably pick out the corn before grinding,
    > but YMMV.
    >
    > A gallon is a lot.


    For some reason I never got the original post in this thread. My usual use
    for pickled vegetables is as a component of enchilada sauce, as discussed in
    "Taqueria Tech". (You'd have to Google for Taqueria Tech; it seems to jump
    around a bit on the net. I copied the whole site and pasted it into a text
    document years ago, but I don't have space to host it myself.)

    Bob


  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Crisping Up Pickled Veggies

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:56:30 -0500, Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > Good question; I've never heard of using a crisping agent like the ones
    > you mention after the fact. Sandwich spread doesn't sound bad. Or
    > drain them, reduce (some of) the syrup they were packed in, chop or
    > grind the vegetables and recombine with the (hopefully) thickened syrup
    > to use as a relish. I'd probaably pick out the corn before grinding,
    > but YMMV.


    I'm going to make some sort of hot relish out of it, I think. I buy
    large cans of pickled jalapenos (a quart for $.75) just for their
    juice so I've always got some pickled jalapenos going to waste.

    -sw

  7. #7
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Crisping Up Pickled Veggies



    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:56:30 -0500, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > > Good question; I've never heard of using a crisping agent like the ones
    > > you mention after the fact. Sandwich spread doesn't sound bad. Or
    > > drain them, reduce (some of) the syrup they were packed in, chop or
    > > grind the vegetables and recombine with the (hopefully) thickened syrup
    > > to use as a relish. I'd probaably pick out the corn before grinding,
    > > but YMMV.

    >
    > I'm going to make some sort of hot relish out of it, I think. I buy
    > large cans of pickled jalapenos (a quart for $.75) just for their
    > juice so I've always got some pickled jalapenos going to waste.
    >
    > -sw


    That's probably your best option. Don't think alum works after the fact.
    Nothing wrong with lots of relish.

  8. #8
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Crisping Up Pickled Veggies

    Arri London wrote:
    >
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:56:30 -0500, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>
    >>> Good question; I've never heard of using a crisping agent like the ones
    >>> you mention after the fact. Sandwich spread doesn't sound bad. Or
    >>> drain them, reduce (some of) the syrup they were packed in, chop or
    >>> grind the vegetables and recombine with the (hopefully) thickened syrup
    >>> to use as a relish. I'd probaably pick out the corn before grinding,
    >>> but YMMV.

    >> I'm going to make some sort of hot relish out of it, I think. I buy
    >> large cans of pickled jalapenos (a quart for $.75) just for their
    >> juice so I've always got some pickled jalapenos going to waste.
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > That's probably your best option. Don't think alum works after the fact.
    > Nothing wrong with lots of relish.


    The best crisping agent that is safe is calcium chloride. Look in the
    canning section of your local supermarket or hardware store for Ball
    brand "Pickle Crisp." Works very well.

    Alternatively you can also find it at your local brew hut, beer brewers
    use it.

    Alum, to me, leaves a bitter taste and is not really recommended by the
    gurus of pickling. If you have a grape vine a couple of leaves placed in
    the bottom of the jar will also help with crispness.

  9. #9
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Crisping Up Pickled Veggies



    George Shirley wrote:
    >
    > Arri London wrote:
    > >
    > > Sqwertz wrote:
    > >> On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:56:30 -0500, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> Good question; I've never heard of using a crisping agent like the ones
    > >>> you mention after the fact. Sandwich spread doesn't sound bad. Or
    > >>> drain them, reduce (some of) the syrup they were packed in, chop or
    > >>> grind the vegetables and recombine with the (hopefully) thickened syrup
    > >>> to use as a relish. I'd probaably pick out the corn before grinding,
    > >>> but YMMV.
    > >> I'm going to make some sort of hot relish out of it, I think. I buy
    > >> large cans of pickled jalapenos (a quart for $.75) just for their
    > >> juice so I've always got some pickled jalapenos going to waste.
    > >>
    > >> -sw

    > >
    > > That's probably your best option. Don't think alum works after the fact.
    > > Nothing wrong with lots of relish.

    >
    > The best crisping agent that is safe is calcium chloride. Look in the
    > canning section of your local supermarket or hardware store for Ball
    > brand "Pickle Crisp." Works very well.


    It works on already pickled foods? It's used prior to pickling, not
    afterwards.

    >
    > Alternatively you can also find it at your local brew hut, beer brewers
    > use it.
    >
    > Alum, to me, leaves a bitter taste and is not really recommended by the
    > gurus of pickling. If you have a grape vine a couple of leaves placed in
    > the bottom of the jar will also help with crispness.


    But not after the fact.

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