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Thread: A couple of pot roast questions

  1. #1
    Scott Guest

    Default A couple of pot roast questions

    The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to
    cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of opportunity
    where the meat is just right and tender as can be?
    Also does it matter how much liquid I add? What happens if I almost
    cover the meat with liquid as oppose to 1/4 - 1/2 of the meat. Is it the
    liquid or the steam that tenderizes the meat?

  2. #2
    Scott Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    Scott wrote:
    > The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    > hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    > another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to
    > cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of opportunity
    > where the meat is just right and tender as can be?
    > Also does it matter how much liquid I add? What happens if I almost
    > cover the meat with liquid as oppose to 1/4 - 1/2 of the meat. Is it the
    > liquid or the steam that tenderizes the meat?


    Oh yeah 1 more question, just about every recipe never mentions turning
    the meat while it's simmering. Wouldn't the meat cook/tenderize more
    evenly if turn while simmering?

  3. #3
    Scott Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    Scott wrote:
    > The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    > hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    > another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to
    > cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of opportunity
    > where the meat is just right and tender as can be?
    > Also does it matter how much liquid I add? What happens if I almost
    > cover the meat with liquid as oppose to 1/4 - 1/2 of the meat. Is it the
    > liquid or the steam that tenderizes the meat?


    Oh yeah 1 more question, just about every recipe never mentions turning
    the meat while it's simmering. Wouldn't the meat cook/tenderize more
    evenly if turn while simmering?

  4. #4
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    Scott wrote:
    > The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    > hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    > another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to
    > cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of opportunity
    > where the meat is just right and tender as can be?


    You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot roast. Chuck
    roast benefits very well from this long, slow cooking. Practically falling
    apart, fork tender when it's done (in relatively little cooking time).
    Makes great gravy and veggies also cook nicely in the juices. I have no
    idea what you cooked.

    Jill



  5. #5
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    Scott wrote:
    > The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    > hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    > another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to
    > cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of opportunity
    > where the meat is just right and tender as can be?


    You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot roast. Chuck
    roast benefits very well from this long, slow cooking. Practically falling
    apart, fork tender when it's done (in relatively little cooking time).
    Makes great gravy and veggies also cook nicely in the juices. I have no
    idea what you cooked.

    Jill



  6. #6
    Scott Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Scott wrote:
    >> The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    >> hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    >> another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to
    >> cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of opportunity
    >> where the meat is just right and tender as can be?

    >
    > You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot roast. Chuck
    > roast benefits very well from this long, slow cooking. Practically falling
    > apart, fork tender when it's done (in relatively little cooking time).
    > Makes great gravy and veggies also cook nicely in the juices. I have no
    > idea what you cooked.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >


    Chuck roast of course

  7. #7
    Scott Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Scott wrote:
    >> The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    >> hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    >> another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to
    >> cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of opportunity
    >> where the meat is just right and tender as can be?

    >
    > You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot roast. Chuck
    > roast benefits very well from this long, slow cooking. Practically falling
    > apart, fork tender when it's done (in relatively little cooking time).
    > Makes great gravy and veggies also cook nicely in the juices. I have no
    > idea what you cooked.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >


    Chuck roast of course

  8. #8
    Scott Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Scott wrote:
    >> The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    >> hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    >> another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to
    >> cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of opportunity
    >> where the meat is just right and tender as can be?

    >
    > You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot roast. Chuck
    > roast benefits very well from this long, slow cooking. Practically falling
    > apart, fork tender when it's done (in relatively little cooking time).
    > Makes great gravy and veggies also cook nicely in the juices. I have no
    > idea what you cooked.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >


    Wait a minute, don't the following statements contradict:
    long, slow cooking
    in relatively little cooking time

  9. #9
    Scott Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Scott wrote:
    >> The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    >> hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    >> another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to
    >> cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of opportunity
    >> where the meat is just right and tender as can be?

    >
    > You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot roast. Chuck
    > roast benefits very well from this long, slow cooking. Practically falling
    > apart, fork tender when it's done (in relatively little cooking time).
    > Makes great gravy and veggies also cook nicely in the juices. I have no
    > idea what you cooked.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >


    Wait a minute, don't the following statements contradict:
    long, slow cooking
    in relatively little cooking time

  10. #10
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    Scott wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> Scott wrote:
    >>> The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    >>> hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    >>> another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow
    >>> to cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of
    >>> opportunity where the meat is just right and tender as can be?

    >>
    >> You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot
    >> roast. Chuck roast benefits very well from this long, slow cooking.
    >> Practically falling apart, fork tender when it's done (in relatively
    >> little cooking time). Makes great gravy and veggies also cook nicely
    >> in the juices. I have no idea what you cooked.
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Wait a minute, don't the following statements contradict:
    > long, slow cooking
    > in relatively little cooking time


    Relatively short cooking time in that you don't cook it 8 hours... 1-1/2 to
    2 hours is slow cooking for a 3 lb. chuck roast

    Jill



  11. #11
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    Scott wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> Scott wrote:
    >>> The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    >>> hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    >>> another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow
    >>> to cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of
    >>> opportunity where the meat is just right and tender as can be?

    >>
    >> You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot
    >> roast. Chuck roast benefits very well from this long, slow cooking.
    >> Practically falling apart, fork tender when it's done (in relatively
    >> little cooking time). Makes great gravy and veggies also cook nicely
    >> in the juices. I have no idea what you cooked.
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Wait a minute, don't the following statements contradict:
    > long, slow cooking
    > in relatively little cooking time


    Relatively short cooking time in that you don't cook it 8 hours... 1-1/2 to
    2 hours is slow cooking for a 3 lb. chuck roast

    Jill



  12. #12
    Scott Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Scott wrote:
    >> jmcquown wrote:
    >>> Scott wrote:
    >>>> The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    >>>> hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    >>>> another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow
    >>>> to cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of
    >>>> opportunity where the meat is just right and tender as can be?
    >>> You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot
    >>> roast. Chuck roast benefits very well from this long, slow cooking.
    >>> Practically falling apart, fork tender when it's done (in relatively
    >>> little cooking time). Makes great gravy and veggies also cook nicely
    >>> in the juices. I have no idea what you cooked.
    >>>
    >>> Jill
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Wait a minute, don't the following statements contradict:
    >> long, slow cooking
    >> in relatively little cooking time

    >
    > Relatively short cooking time in that you don't cook it 8 hours... 1-1/2 to
    > 2 hours is slow cooking for a 3 lb. chuck roast
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >


    OK now what would happen if I did cook it for 8 hours? Is there such a
    thing as being too tender?

  13. #13
    Scott Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Scott wrote:
    >> jmcquown wrote:
    >>> Scott wrote:
    >>>> The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2
    >>>> hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for
    >>>> another 45 mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow
    >>>> to cook too long, in other words is there a certain window of
    >>>> opportunity where the meat is just right and tender as can be?
    >>> You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot
    >>> roast. Chuck roast benefits very well from this long, slow cooking.
    >>> Practically falling apart, fork tender when it's done (in relatively
    >>> little cooking time). Makes great gravy and veggies also cook nicely
    >>> in the juices. I have no idea what you cooked.
    >>>
    >>> Jill
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Wait a minute, don't the following statements contradict:
    >> long, slow cooking
    >> in relatively little cooking time

    >
    > Relatively short cooking time in that you don't cook it 8 hours... 1-1/2 to
    > 2 hours is slow cooking for a 3 lb. chuck roast
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >


    OK now what would happen if I did cook it for 8 hours? Is there such a
    thing as being too tender?

  14. #14
    Default User Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    Scott wrote:


    > OK now what would happen if I did cook it for 8 hours? Is there such
    > a thing as being too tender?


    What will happen is that it will begin to fall apart. That's not
    necessarily a bad thing, as you can they shred it with a fork. I do
    that deliberately at times. Shredded beef makes great sandwiches and
    taco filling.




    Brian

    --
    If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
    won't shut up.
    -- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)

  15. #15
    Default User Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    Scott wrote:


    > OK now what would happen if I did cook it for 8 hours? Is there such
    > a thing as being too tender?


    What will happen is that it will begin to fall apart. That's not
    necessarily a bad thing, as you can they shred it with a fork. I do
    that deliberately at times. Shredded beef makes great sandwiches and
    taco filling.




    Brian

    --
    If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
    won't shut up.
    -- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)

  16. #16
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    Scott wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> Scott wrote:
    >>> jmcquown wrote:
    >>>> Scott wrote:
    >>>>> The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it
    >>>>> after 2 hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it
    >>>>> simmer for another 45
    >>>> You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot
    >>>> roast. Chuck roast benefits very well from this long, slow
    >>>> cooking. Practically falling apart, fork tender when it's done (in
    >>>> relatively little cooking time). Makes great gravy and veggies
    >>>> also cook nicely in the juices. I have no idea what you cooked.
    >>>>
    >>>> Jill
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Wait a minute, don't the following statements contradict:
    >>> long, slow cooking
    >>> in relatively little cooking time

    >>
    >> Relatively short cooking time in that you don't cook it 8 hours...
    >> 1-1/2 to 2 hours is slow cooking for a 3 lb. chuck roast
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>
    >>

    >
    > OK now what would happen if I did cook it for 8 hours? Is there such a
    > thing as being too tender?


    You'd have a piece of charcoal (unless you were using a slow cooker/crock
    pot).

    Jill



  17. #17
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions

    Scott wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> Scott wrote:
    >>> jmcquown wrote:
    >>>> Scott wrote:
    >>>>> The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it
    >>>>> after 2 hours it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it
    >>>>> simmer for another 45
    >>>> You don't mention at all what cut of meat you used for the pot
    >>>> roast. Chuck roast benefits very well from this long, slow
    >>>> cooking. Practically falling apart, fork tender when it's done (in
    >>>> relatively little cooking time). Makes great gravy and veggies
    >>>> also cook nicely in the juices. I have no idea what you cooked.
    >>>>
    >>>> Jill
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Wait a minute, don't the following statements contradict:
    >>> long, slow cooking
    >>> in relatively little cooking time

    >>
    >> Relatively short cooking time in that you don't cook it 8 hours...
    >> 1-1/2 to 2 hours is slow cooking for a 3 lb. chuck roast
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>
    >>

    >
    > OK now what would happen if I did cook it for 8 hours? Is there such a
    > thing as being too tender?


    You'd have a piece of charcoal (unless you were using a slow cooker/crock
    pot).

    Jill



  18. #18
    gunner Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions


    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2 hours
    > it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for another 45
    > mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to cook too long,
    > in other words is there a certain window of opportunity where the meat is
    > just right and tender as can be?
    > Also does it matter how much liquid I add? What happens if I almost cover
    > the meat with liquid as oppose to 1/4 - 1/2 of the meat. Is it the liquid
    > or the steam that tenderizes the meat?


    Think temp... not time.



  19. #19
    gunner Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions


    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2 hours
    > it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for another 45
    > mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to cook too long,
    > in other words is there a certain window of opportunity where the meat is
    > just right and tender as can be?
    > Also does it matter how much liquid I add? What happens if I almost cover
    > the meat with liquid as oppose to 1/4 - 1/2 of the meat. Is it the liquid
    > or the steam that tenderizes the meat?


    Think temp... not time.



  20. #20
    Edwin Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: A couple of pot roast questions


    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > The other night I made some pot roast and when I check on it after 2 hours
    > it wasn't as tender as I like it to be so I let it simmer for another 45
    > mins then I got to thinking what would happened if allow to cook too long,
    > in other words is there a certain window of opportunity where the meat is
    > just right and tender as can be?
    > Also does it matter how much liquid I add? What happens if I almost cover
    > the meat with liquid as oppose to 1/4 - 1/2 of the meat. Is it the liquid
    > or the steam that tenderizes the meat?



    If you go too long, it can dry and start to get tough.

    It is neither the liquid nor the steam that makes it tender. Tough cuts of
    meat come from the harder working parts of the animal. The have more
    collagen in the muscle, thus the toughness. By slowly heating the meat and
    holding it at about 163 degrees, the collagen breaks down and the meat
    becomes more tender. Notice how the liquid increases as it cooks? Once the
    collagen is gone and the fat is gone, the meat will start to dry. Moisture
    slows the process and gives a wider safety margin.



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