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Thread: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

  1. #1
    Kent Guest

    Default Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    Mrs. bought 5lbs of boneless country style pork ribs today. I'd like to
    grill them. How do you do it? I don't find many recipes for grilling country
    style ribs.
    If you want to see something pretty ridiculous to point where it's humerous
    look at the BBQ Pit Boys Old Time.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt_yLN57E8Y

    They boil the ribs in barbecue sauce and beer in an aluminum pan on the
    Weber charcoal grill.

    Thanks for any thoughts.

    Kent







  2. #2
    Ms P Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?



    "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:iuj2p6$2ju$[email protected]..
    > Mrs. bought 5lbs of boneless country style pork ribs today. I'd like to
    > grill them. How do you do it? I don't find many recipes for grilling
    > country style ribs.
    > If you want to see something pretty ridiculous to point where it's
    > humerous look at the BBQ Pit Boys Old Time.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt_yLN57E8Y
    >
    > They boil the ribs in barbecue sauce and beer in an aluminum pan on the
    > Weber charcoal grill.
    >
    > Thanks for any thoughts.
    >
    > Kent


    I grill them indirect with lump charcoal. They take about 2 hours to cook.
    I also sauce them with a high sugar sauce so they caramelize by the time
    they're done.

    The boneless ones shrink up weird and don't cook nearly as nice as the bone
    in ones.

    Ms P


  3. #3
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    Re: iuj2p6$2ju$[email protected]
    Kent <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Mrs. bought 5lbs of boneless country style pork ribs today. I'd like
    > to grill them. How do you do it? I don't find many recipes for
    > grilling country style ribs.
    > If you want to see something pretty ridiculous to point where it's
    > humerous look at the BBQ Pit Boys Old Time.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt_yLN57E8Y
    >
    > They boil the ribs in barbecue sauce and beer in an aluminum pan on
    > the Weber charcoal grill.
    >
    > Thanks for any thoughts.
    >
    > Kent


    http://askabutcher.proboards.com/ind...lay&thread=106



  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 17:02:03 -0700, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Mrs. bought 5lbs of boneless country style pork ribs today. I'd like to
    > grill them. How do you do it? I don't find many recipes for grilling country
    > style ribs.


    <snip>
    >
    > Thanks for any thoughts.
    >

    I've forgotten if you're using gas or charcoal. You want the inside
    to cook and the outside to brown nicely without charring. For
    charcoal, I'd do 5 pounds over indirect heat (if you can manage it);
    otherwise medium/med-low on a preheated gas grill.

    I don't like the rubs that are on the internet, so I use my preferred
    combination of herbs with no sugar or chili powder in it. BBQ sauce
    is optional.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  5. #5
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?


    Kent wrote:
    >
    > Mrs. bought 5lbs of boneless country style pork ribs today. I'd like to
    > grill them. How do you do it? I don't find many recipes for grilling country
    > style ribs.
    > If you want to see something pretty ridiculous to point where it's humerous
    > look at the BBQ Pit Boys Old Time.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt_yLN57E8Y
    >
    > They boil the ribs in barbecue sauce and beer in an aluminum pan on the
    > Weber charcoal grill.
    >
    > Thanks for any thoughts.
    >
    > Kent


    I usually marinate them in jerk rub (Walkerswood) and then braise them
    until they are fall apart tender and serve with rice and peas. I expect
    you could smoke them as well, but I don't think grilling will give them
    enough time to become tender.

  6. #6
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    Kent wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Mrs. bought 5lbs of boneless country style pork ribs today. I'd like
    > to grill them. How do you do it? I don't find many recipes for
    > grilling country style ribs. If you want to see something pretty
    > ridiculous to point where it's humerous look at the BBQ Pit Boys Old
    > Time.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt_yLN57E8Y
    >
    > They boil the ribs in barbecue sauce and beer in an aluminum pan on
    > the Weber charcoal grill.
    >
    > Thanks for any thoughts.
    >
    > Kent


    Hi Kent, just had a discussion on these with one of the others here.
    'Technically' they are not 'ribs' but another cut that seems to vary
    from area to area. Ignore it if someone tries to tell you an exact cut
    as they are only speaking their area on it.

    The ones here seem to be the meaty part below the ribs and over the
    stomach and the cut is usually 5-6 inches long, and sort of 'square'
    but that is often crosscut for you to block shaped. There will be some
    silver tissue running through it and bits of fatty material as well but
    most is meat. Color will range from a medium 'red' to a 'fairly dark
    pink', often in the same slice.

    Cooking them varies but if you have the same type, they take well to
    hot smoking with a rub or a marinade. You can precook them mostly in a
    crockpot in the marinade then finish off on a hotter grill if you like.

    Main way we do it when grilling is a marinade of 'hot sweet chicken
    sauce', soy sauce, a little vinegar, and worstershire. Marinade
    several hours. Our 'smoker/grill' is the sort with the side area for
    coals and wood chips though you can add coals and/or chips to the
    center as well. Takes about 2-3 hours.

    Another thing they do well with, is being sliced down to bitesize and
    used in fast stirfrys.

    Leftovers do very well in pancit (cantonese or glass noodle) or fried
    rice if the seasonings used match.

    --


  7. #7
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    In article <iuj2p6$2ju$[email protected]>, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Mrs. bought 5lbs of boneless country style pork ribs today. I'd like to
    > grill them. How do you do it? I don't find many recipes for grilling country
    > style ribs.
    > If you want to see something pretty ridiculous to point where it's humerous
    > look at the BBQ Pit Boys Old Time.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt_yLN57E8Y
    >
    > They boil the ribs in barbecue sauce and beer in an aluminum pan on the
    > Weber charcoal grill.
    >
    > Thanks for any thoughts.
    >
    > Kent


    I wouldn't grill them myself. I cook them at 225F for 4 to 5 hours in my
    smoke cooker (without using wood chips). I flavor them with a rub of
    salt, coarse grind pepper, and garlic- no sauce. There's plenty of
    flavor and they are succulent. There's a slight residual smoke flavor
    imparted by the cooker.

    D.M.

  8. #8
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    On Jul 1, 4:55*pm, "cshenk" <cshe...@cox.net> wrote:
    > Kent wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > > Mrs. bought 5lbs of boneless country style pork ribs today. I'd like
    > > to grill them. How do you do it? I don't find many recipes for
    > > grilling country style ribs. *If you want to see something pretty
    > > ridiculous to point where it's humerous look at the BBQ Pit Boys Old
    > > Time.

    >
    > >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt_yLN57E8Y

    >
    > > They boil the ribs in barbecue sauce and beer in an aluminum pan on
    > > the Weber charcoal grill.

    >
    > > Thanks for any thoughts.

    >
    > > Kent

    >
    > Hi Kent, just had a discussion on these with one of the others here.
    > 'Technically' they are not 'ribs' but another cut that seems to vary
    > from area to area. *Ignore it if someone tries to tell you an exact cut
    > as they are only speaking their area on it.
    >
    > The ones here seem to be the meaty part below the ribs and over the
    > stomach and the cut is usually 5-6 inches long, and sort of 'square'
    > but that is often crosscut for you to block shaped. *There will be some
    > silver tissue running through it and bits of fatty material as well but
    > most is meat. *Color will range from a medium 'red' to a 'fairly dark
    > pink', often in the same slice.
    >
    > Cooking them varies but if you have the same type, they take well to
    > hot smoking with a rub or a marinade. *You can precook them mostly in a
    > crockpot in the marinade then finish off on a hotter grill if you like.
    >
    > Main way we do it when grilling is a marinade of 'hot sweet chicken
    > sauce', soy sauce, a little vinegar, and worstershire. *Marinade
    > several hours. *Our 'smoker/grill' is the sort with the side area for
    > coals and wood chips though you can add coals and/or chips to the
    > center as well. *Takes about 2-3 hours.
    >
    > Another thing they do well with, is being sliced down to bitesize and
    > used in fast stirfrys.
    >
    > Leftovers do very well in pancit (cantonese or glass noodle) or fried
    > rice if the seasonings used match.



    Thanks for that. If Kent had not ignored the magnificent
    boneless troll ribs thread he'd already know everything there is to
    know about the topic. It makes me feel good to know I am not the only
    to have come in here referring to that meat product as boneless ribs.
    I'm sure they're great grilled, but my methods for cooking are very
    limited. So far I have only broiled them. I think they're great. I
    broil them - depending on thickness about 7 to 9 minutes per side -
    then put them in the fridge and use them pilafs or mix them with
    already cooked red taters and veggies and toss in the microwave.
    Interesting to see this topic come up again. But where are the
    instigators who jumped all over me for using the term 'boneless pork
    ribs', as it's obvious I'm not the only one who has seen the product
    labeled that way. Sorry, had to get that out.

    TJ


  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    Carol wrote:

    > Main way we do it when grilling is a marinade of 'hot sweet chicken
    > sauce', soy sauce, a little vinegar, and worstershire. Marinade
    > several hours. Our 'smoker/grill' is the sort with the side area for
    > coals and wood chips though you can add coals and/or chips to the
    > center as well. Takes about 2-3 hours.
    >
    > Another thing they do well with, is being sliced down to bitesize and
    > used in fast stirfrys.


    Because of their shape, you can easily cut them into cubes for kabobs.

    Bob




  10. #10
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    On Jul 1, 4:55 pm, "cshenk" <cshe...@cox.net> wrote:

    > Cooking them varies but if you have the same type, they take well to
    > hot smoking with a rub or a marinade. You can precook them mostly in a
    > crockpot in the marinade then finish off on a hotter grill if you like.
    >
    > Main way we do it when grilling is a marinade of 'hot sweet chicken
    > sauce', soy sauce, a little vinegar, and worstershire. Marinade
    > several hours. Our 'smoker/grill' is the sort with the side area for
    > coals and wood chips though you can add coals and/or chips to the
    > center as well. Takes about 2-3 hours.
    >
    > Another thing they do well with, is being sliced down to bitesize and
    > used in fast stirfrys.


    > Leftovers do very well in pancit (cantonese or glass noodle) or fried
    > rice if the seasonings used match.



    I can't and won't make any suggestions on how to cook them as we
    could be accidentally talking about two different cuts of meat, plus
    I'm not claiming to be an accomplished cook, only that I've used the
    boneless ribs and I always broil them.

    I don't know if you saw my post in the other thread, but I
    approached the butcher at my supermarket about the ribs a few weeks
    ago. I asked what they really were. He pointed to a a cut called
    'boneless loin rib end roast'. It was kind of thick. He told me that
    they take the roast and cut it horizontally into two thinner pieces,
    then score them width-wise every inch or so, or cut them all the way
    through. These things cook quick. I don't care if they're almost
    pink in the middle as I use them in pilafs and other dishes that are
    going to be microwaved a bit anyway. But my style of cooking is my
    own selfish style that has been developed over the years for my own
    selfish needs. I like to cook or prep things for 6 days or so, then
    eat the same thing every day, but slightly adjusting if I feel so
    inclined, as we already discussed. But the butcher told me that's
    what the so-called boneless pork ribs are - a part of meat cut from
    the rib end or the back or whatever, it's just meat to me.

    Tommy 'the animal' Jo Jo

  11. #11
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    Tommy Joe wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On Jul 1, 4:55*pm, "cshenk" <cshe...@cox.net> wrote:
    > > Kent wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    > >
    > > > Mrs. bought 5lbs of boneless country style pork ribs today. I'd
    > > > like to grill them. How do you do it? I don't find many recipes
    > > > for grilling country style ribs. *If you want to see something
    > > > pretty ridiculous to point where it's humerous look at the BBQ
    > > > Pit Boys Old Time.

    > >
    > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt_yLN57E8Y

    > >
    > > > They boil the ribs in barbecue sauce and beer in an aluminum pan
    > > > on the Weber charcoal grill.

    > >
    > > > Thanks for any thoughts.

    > >
    > > > Kent

    > >
    > > Hi Kent, just had a discussion on these with one of the others here.
    > > 'Technically' they are not 'ribs' but another cut that seems to vary
    > > from area to area. *Ignore it if someone tries to tell you an exact
    > > cut as they are only speaking their area on it.
    > >
    > > The ones here seem to be the meaty part below the ribs and over the
    > > stomach and the cut is usually 5-6 inches long, and sort of 'square'
    > > but that is often crosscut for you to block shaped. *There will be
    > > some silver tissue running through it and bits of fatty material as
    > > well but most is meat. *Color will range from a medium 'red' to a
    > > 'fairly dark pink', often in the same slice.
    > >
    > > Cooking them varies but if you have the same type, they take well to
    > > hot smoking with a rub or a marinade. *You can precook them mostly
    > > in a crockpot in the marinade then finish off on a hotter grill if
    > > you like.
    > >
    > > Main way we do it when grilling is a marinade of 'hot sweet chicken
    > > sauce', soy sauce, a little vinegar, and worstershire. *Marinade
    > > several hours. *Our 'smoker/grill' is the sort with the side area
    > > for coals and wood chips though you can add coals and/or chips to
    > > the center as well. *Takes about 2-3 hours.
    > >
    > > Another thing they do well with, is being sliced down to bitesize
    > > and used in fast stirfrys.
    > >
    > > Leftovers do very well in pancit (cantonese or glass noodle) or
    > > fried rice if the seasonings used match.

    >
    >
    > Thanks for that. If Kent had not ignored the magnificent
    > boneless troll ribs thread he'd already know everything there is to
    > know about the topic. It makes me feel good to know I am not the only
    > to have come in here referring to that meat product as boneless ribs.
    > I'm sure they're great grilled, but my methods for cooking are very
    > limited. So far I have only broiled them. I think they're great. I
    > broil them - depending on thickness about 7 to 9 minutes per side -
    > then put them in the fridge and use them pilafs or mix them with
    > already cooked red taters and veggies and toss in the microwave.
    > Interesting to see this topic come up again. But where are the
    > instigators who jumped all over me for using the term 'boneless pork
    > ribs', as it's obvious I'm not the only one who has seen the product
    > labeled that way. Sorry, had to get that out.
    >
    > TJ


    LOL! Maybe the ones who were all hot and bothered about it learned
    there really is a cut called that in some parts of the country.

    Meantime, just cleaned my chest freezer a bit. I haven't ground up
    food for the dogs in a bit and need to get more. In there was an
    improperly stored (now freezer burned) packet of this. The dogs will
    love it! They can't seem to taste freezer burn so as long as it hasn't
    been left out to go bad, is fine 'raw feeding' material.

    It's defrosting along with some stray chicken bits and other oddiments
    we aren't really sure of (grin). Next you will see Sheldon go 'ape' on
    why chest freezers are bad. In fact, he's wrong if you have dogs and a
    good quality grinder.

    As I typoed to you, Don found the last pack of 10lbs chicken necks for
    the grinder. We buy them and other parts in 20-40lb bulk cases (bagged
    10lbs each inside) for 39-69 cents a lb. Human food grade all of it.
    It goes in the tasin grinder, bone and all for the dogs. Blue
    Wilderness kibble is paired with this or some canned grain-free if we
    havent ground up any in a bit. I'll admit, grinding my own is a heck
    of a lot cheaper than grain-free canned dog food. Both of my dogs
    *and* my cat have grain issues though Daisy-chan (cat) isn't *too* bad
    about it.

    --


  12. #12
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    Bob Terwilliger wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Carol wrote:
    >
    > > Main way we do it when grilling is a marinade of 'hot sweet chicken
    > > sauce', soy sauce, a little vinegar, and worstershire. Marinade
    > > several hours. Our 'smoker/grill' is the sort with the side area
    > > for coals and wood chips though you can add coals and/or chips to
    > > the center as well. Takes about 2-3 hours.
    > >
    > > Another thing they do well with, is being sliced down to bitesize
    > > and used in fast stirfrys.

    >
    > Because of their shape, you can easily cut them into cubes for kabobs.


    Absolutely! Most of the work is done for you in that case. TJ gets a
    possibly thinner cut of what seems the same they sell here (not
    suprising, we live not that far from one another with me in southern VA
    and him in NC). It's possible a major 'marketroid pork place' is
    servicing both our markets.

    He broils them 15-18 mins or so (flipping midway through).

    Too bad the set we just found in the freezer depth wasn't re-wrapped.
    Charlotte probably put it away for us and it wasn't in the right bin so
    now it's petfood for the grinder once it defrosts.


    --


  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    On Sat, 02 Jul 2011 14:17:51 -0500, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Tommy Joe wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > >
    > > Thanks for that. If Kent had not ignored the magnificent
    > > boneless troll ribs thread he'd already know everything there is to
    > > know about the topic. It makes me feel good to know I am not the only
    > > to have come in here referring to that meat product as boneless ribs.
    > > I'm sure they're great grilled, but my methods for cooking are very
    > > limited. So far I have only broiled them. I think they're great. I
    > > broil them - depending on thickness about 7 to 9 minutes per side -
    > > then put them in the fridge and use them pilafs or mix them with
    > > already cooked red taters and veggies and toss in the microwave.
    > > Interesting to see this topic come up again. But where are the
    > > instigators who jumped all over me for using the term 'boneless pork
    > > ribs', as it's obvious I'm not the only one who has seen the product
    > > labeled that way. Sorry, had to get that out.
    > >
    > > TJ

    >
    > LOL! Maybe the ones who were all hot and bothered about it learned
    > there really is a cut called that in some parts of the country.


    They're the usually the same people who say there's no such thing as a
    boneless pork chop. <shrug>

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  14. #14
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    Re: 4e0e7d49$0$927$c3e8da3$[email protected]
    Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    > Carol wrote:
    >
    >> Main way we do it when grilling is a marinade of 'hot sweet chicken
    >> sauce', soy sauce, a little vinegar, and worstershire. Marinade
    >> several hours. Our 'smoker/grill' is the sort with the side area for
    >> coals and wood chips though you can add coals and/or chips to the
    >> center as well. Takes about 2-3 hours.
    >>
    >> Another thing they do well with, is being sliced down to bitesize and
    >> used in fast stirfrys.

    >
    > Because of their shape, you can easily cut them into cubes for kabobs.
    >
    > Bob


    Per the link I posted which I should have prefaced with "everything you ever
    wanted to know about country style ribs", because it is a history of what
    they are and how they got that way, it's most likely pork butt and as such
    isn't likely to do well with a real fast hot cook typical of kabobs. The
    temp needs to get up there and spend a little time rendering and breaking
    down the fat and collagen.

    MartyB



  15. #15
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    Re: [email protected]
    cshenk <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Tommy Joe wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> On Jul 1, 4:55 pm, "cshenk" <cshe...@cox.net> wrote:
    >>> Kent wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>>
    >>>> Mrs. bought 5lbs of boneless country style pork ribs today. I'd
    >>>> like to grill them. How do you do it? I don't find many recipes
    >>>> for grilling country style ribs. If you want to see something
    >>>> pretty ridiculous to point where it's humerous look at the BBQ
    >>>> Pit Boys Old Time.
    >>>
    >>>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt_yLN57E8Y
    >>>
    >>>> They boil the ribs in barbecue sauce and beer in an aluminum pan
    >>>> on the Weber charcoal grill.
    >>>
    >>>> Thanks for any thoughts.
    >>>
    >>>> Kent
    >>>
    >>> Hi Kent, just had a discussion on these with one of the others here.
    >>> 'Technically' they are not 'ribs' but another cut that seems to vary
    >>> from area to area. Ignore it if someone tries to tell you an exact
    >>> cut as they are only speaking their area on it.
    >>>
    >>> The ones here seem to be the meaty part below the ribs and over the
    >>> stomach and the cut is usually 5-6 inches long, and sort of 'square'
    >>> but that is often crosscut for you to block shaped. There will be
    >>> some silver tissue running through it and bits of fatty material as
    >>> well but most is meat. Color will range from a medium 'red' to a
    >>> 'fairly dark pink', often in the same slice.
    >>>
    >>> Cooking them varies but if you have the same type, they take well to
    >>> hot smoking with a rub or a marinade. You can precook them mostly
    >>> in a crockpot in the marinade then finish off on a hotter grill if
    >>> you like.
    >>>
    >>> Main way we do it when grilling is a marinade of 'hot sweet chicken
    >>> sauce', soy sauce, a little vinegar, and worstershire. Marinade
    >>> several hours. Our 'smoker/grill' is the sort with the side area
    >>> for coals and wood chips though you can add coals and/or chips to
    >>> the center as well. Takes about 2-3 hours.
    >>>
    >>> Another thing they do well with, is being sliced down to bitesize
    >>> and used in fast stirfrys.
    >>>
    >>> Leftovers do very well in pancit (cantonese or glass noodle) or
    >>> fried rice if the seasonings used match.

    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks for that. If Kent had not ignored the magnificent
    >> boneless troll ribs thread he'd already know everything there is to
    >> know about the topic. It makes me feel good to know I am not the
    >> only to have come in here referring to that meat product as boneless
    >> ribs. I'm sure they're great grilled, but my methods for cooking are
    >> very limited. So far I have only broiled them. I think they're
    >> great. I broil them - depending on thickness about 7 to 9 minutes
    >> per side - then put them in the fridge and use them pilafs or mix
    >> them with already cooked red taters and veggies and toss in the
    >> microwave. Interesting to see this topic come up again. But where
    >> are the instigators who jumped all over me for using the term
    >> 'boneless pork ribs', as it's obvious I'm not the only one who has
    >> seen the product labeled that way. Sorry, had to get that out.
    >>
    >> TJ

    >
    > LOL! Maybe the ones who were all hot and bothered about it learned
    > there really is a cut called that in some parts of the country.
    >
    > Meantime, just cleaned my chest freezer a bit. I haven't ground up
    > food for the dogs in a bit and need to get more. In there was an
    > improperly stored (now freezer burned) packet of this. The dogs will
    > love it! They can't seem to taste freezer burn so as long as it
    > hasn't been left out to go bad, is fine 'raw feeding' material.
    >
    > It's defrosting along with some stray chicken bits and other oddiments
    > we aren't really sure of (grin). Next you will see Sheldon go 'ape'
    > on why chest freezers are bad. In fact, he's wrong if you have dogs
    > and a good quality grinder.
    >
    > As I typoed to you, Don found the last pack of 10lbs chicken necks for
    > the grinder. We buy them and other parts in 20-40lb bulk cases
    > (bagged 10lbs each inside) for 39-69 cents a lb. Human food grade
    > all of it. It goes in the tasin grinder, bone and all for the dogs.
    > Blue Wilderness kibble is paired with this or some canned grain-free
    > if we havent ground up any in a bit. I'll admit, grinding my own is
    > a heck of a lot cheaper than grain-free canned dog food. Both of my
    > dogs *and* my cat have grain issues though Daisy-chan (cat) isn't
    > *too* bad about it.


    Regardless, boneless ribs is almost always a misnomer and misleading when
    discussing what is sold in a supermarket under that name. I posted a link in
    this thread which gives detailed information on what country style ribs are
    and how they came to be what they are. In fact, it's exceedingly likely that
    this boneless country style rib is pork butt. But some folks are bound and
    determined to believe whatever it says on a label.

    There can be boneless ribs of course... but nobody sells spares or baby back
    ribs deboned. It's possible for short ribs to be sold boneless, but often
    what is sold as boneless short ribs is actually chuck meat.

    MartyB
    MartyB



  16. #16
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    On 7/1/2011 4:55 PM, cshenk wrote:
    > Cooking them varies but if you have the same type, they take well to
    > hot smoking with a rub or a marinade. You can precook them mostly in a
    > crockpot in the marinade then finish off on a hotter grill if you like.


    I've tried several methods because I really like them. But incorrectly
    cooked, they will be tough and dry. My mom used to pre-cook them in the
    oven then finish on the grill. I can't remember if she actually braised
    them or just dry cooked them, but they turned out well. I've tried the
    crockpot method and finish on the grill but they were horribly dried out.

  17. #17
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    On Jul 2, 3:17*pm, "cshenk" <cshe...@cox.net> wrote:

    > LOL! *Maybe the ones who were all hot and bothered about it learned
    > there really is a cut called that in some parts of the country.
    >
    > Meantime, just cleaned my chest freezer a bit. *I haven't ground up
    > food for the dogs in a bit and need to get more. In there was an
    > improperly stored (now freezer burned) packet of this. *The dogs will
    > love it! *They can't seem to taste freezer burn so as long as it hasn't
    > been left out to go bad, is fine 'raw feeding' material.
    >
    > It's defrosting along with some stray chicken bits and other oddiments
    > we aren't really sure of (grin). *Next you will see Sheldon go 'ape' on
    > why chest freezers are bad. *In fact, he's wrong if you have dogs and a
    > good quality grinder.
    >
    > As I typoed to you, Don found the last pack of 10lbs chicken necks for
    > the grinder. *We buy them and other parts in 20-40lb bulk cases (bagged
    > 10lbs each inside) for 39-69 cents a lb. *Human food grade all of it.
    > It goes in the tasin grinder, bone and all for the dogs. *Blue
    > Wilderness kibble is paired with this or some canned grain-free if we
    > havent ground up any in a bit. *I'll admit, grinding my own is a heck
    > of a lot cheaper than grain-free canned dog food. *Both of my dogs
    > *and* my cat have grain issues though Daisy-chan (cat) isn't *too* bad
    > about it.



    My entire adult life I've lived in furnished apartments. I have no
    idea what it's like to own a freezer. I mean a full freezer, not the
    type that sits atop a fridge. When I moved into this place 16 years
    ago, they had a fridge like all the others I'd ever seen, the type
    with the little metal freezer in the actual fridge, not a separate
    compartment. It worked ok, but not on ice cream. I could not keep
    ice cream bars and so forth hard. Never was able to do that with the
    old fashioned freezer in the fridge thing.

    But get this. One day about 12 years ago I had a little extra cash
    and decided I was sick of it. So I looked in the newspaper for used
    fridges. I found one and called the guy. I went by in the cab one
    night and checked it out. It looked kind of big. I should have used
    a tape measure, but I'm not a tape measure guy. So I said ok, I'll
    buy it. But how are you going to get it to me?

    The guy said he and his buddy would bring it in a pickup. They
    did. This thing had a freezer with a separate door, the first time in
    my life I'd owned such a thing. Oh such joy. But I had
    underestimated the things size. I live on the third floor (top) of
    this building, and there is no elevator. This building went up in
    1927. The steps are narrow and twist into the hallways. It took all
    3 of us an hour to get it up there. We used cardboard and slid the
    thing up, then stood it up, but not all the way, as it would bang into
    the ceiling and go nowhere. I was drenched in sweat. I paid the two
    guys for their trouble, and believe me, there was plenty of it.

    Anyway, about 3, maybe 4 years later, I'm noticing my electric
    bill is going up - from like $20 a month to nearly $40. Then up to
    $50. I'm calling the power company and telling them they must be
    getting a false reading. They're sticking to their guns. I'm getting
    pissed about. Then one day the big fridge died. I went out to get
    something and the food was warm. I opened the freezer and the ice
    cubes had melted.

    I called the apartment manager and told them I needed a fridge.
    I expected a used one, but for them it was more cost effective to buy
    a new one at Sears. It took a week. A few months after they
    installed the new fridge, which is the most modern one I've ever owned
    - cheap and plastic-like, but very effective - I noticed one day that
    my electric bill had gone down to below $20. All that time the big
    fridge was dying on me and sucking up electricity and I never
    suspected it. Anyway, that was a funny and stupid adventure in my
    personal freezer/fridge history. --- Yeah, I get it, feed the dogs
    the old stuff just to test it out, the way Kings used to have peasants
    sample their food before eating, to test it for poison or freshness.
    Looks like the boneless pork ribs topic will not die.

    TJ

  18. #18
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    On Jul 2, 7:14*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    september.invalid> wrote:

    > Per the link I posted which I should have prefaced with "everything you ever
    > wanted to know about country style ribs", because it is a history of what
    > they are and how they got that way, it's most likely pork butt and as such
    > isn't likely to do well with a real fast hot cook typical of kabobs. The
    > temp needs to get up there and spend a little time rendering and breaking
    > down the fat and collagen.




    My arab grandparents used leg of lamb for shishkebob and man was
    it great. They lived in Allentown Pa. I loved almost all the arab
    food they and my other relatives made. Funny thing though, when
    they'd have a bazaar or other outdoor event where shishkebob would be
    made, they didn't use the pita bread nearly as much as they used
    hoagie rolls from a place called Malones Bakery which in my opinion
    makes the best hoagie rolls in the country, which are the same rolls
    used for cheese steaks, of which Allentowns are every bit as good or
    better than Phillys. Anyway, they used leg of lamb for the kebobs and
    they were great - charred on the outside and sort of pink in the
    middle. No veggies. Nothing. Just the meat. Put that big metal
    stick inside that hoagie roll and slide the meat off. Nice and
    juicy. Yeah, I see the boneless pork ribs as being perhaps too fatty
    for that. Leg of lamb is really quite lean. It is also used for raw
    kibbee, a mix of #1 cracked wheat (the finest) and meat and just a few
    spices, I think allspice actually. The mix is kneaded and put on a
    big oval plate and placed in the fridge to get cold. I used to give
    some to my friends when I was a kid in Allentown, and all of them
    loved it, till I'd tell them they just ate raw meat. But you're
    right, I'm not sure the pork would make good kebobs.

    TJ

  19. #19
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    On Jul 2, 7:21*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    september.invalid> wrote:

    > Regardless, boneless ribs is almost always a misnomer and misleading when
    > discussing what is sold in a supermarket under that name. I posted a linkin
    > this thread which gives detailed information on what country style ribs are
    > and how they came to be what they are. In fact, it's exceedingly likely that
    > this boneless country style rib is pork butt. But some folks are bound and
    > determined to believe whatever it says on a label.
    >
    > There can be boneless ribs of course... but nobody sells spares or baby back
    > ribs deboned. It's possible for short ribs to be sold boneless, but often
    > what is sold as boneless short ribs is actually chuck meat.



    It would be nice to have everything labeled according to
    perfection. But such is not always the case. For instance, the other
    night I turned on ABC TV to watch Who Wants to be a Millionaire -
    which is how it was labeled in the tv guide - but instead got the
    talking head of President Obama. I didn't see him listed in the
    guide. Same thing a few weeks ago when I turned on the tv to catch
    another show as labeled in the guide, only to find some stupid weather
    alert going on for the entire duration of the program I never got to
    see. And how about stations that call themselves something like for
    instance "The Comedy Channel", but then around 3am or so it becomes
    "The Informercial Channel", but they don't label it as that. It's
    still called the Comedy Channel even though it's not showing comedy,
    although most of the time the infomericals are funnier than the so-
    called comedy anyway. I agree, labeling is important, but in the case
    of the boneless pork ribs, I'm not sure it's done with the purpose of
    fooling anyone, although certainly I could be wrong. I talked with
    the butcher at the market and he showed me what the boneless ribs come
    from - a pork loin rib end roast, which itself comes from something
    larger on the new dead creature, each new hunk of meat carved away
    from the dead beast given a name and packaged as if it came directly
    from the heavens.

    TJ

  20. #20
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Country Style Pork Ribs - How to?

    On Jul 2, 3:17*pm, "cshenk" <cshe...@cox.net> wrote:

    > LOL! *Maybe the ones who were all hot and bothered about it learned
    > there really is a cut called that in some parts of the country.
    >
    > Meantime, just cleaned my chest freezer a bit. *I haven't ground up
    > food for the dogs in a bit and need to get more. In there was an
    > improperly stored (now freezer burned) packet of this. *The dogs will
    > love it! *They can't seem to taste freezer burn so as long as it hasn't
    > been left out to go bad, is fine 'raw feeding' material.
    >
    > It's defrosting along with some stray chicken bits and other oddiments
    > we aren't really sure of (grin). *Next you will see Sheldon go 'ape' on
    > why chest freezers are bad. *In fact, he's wrong if you have dogs and a
    > good quality grinder.
    >
    > As I typoed to you, Don found the last pack of 10lbs chicken necks for
    > the grinder. *We buy them and other parts in 20-40lb bulk cases (bagged
    > 10lbs each inside) for 39-69 cents a lb. *Human food grade all of it.
    > It goes in the tasin grinder, bone and all for the dogs. *Blue
    > Wilderness kibble is paired with this or some canned grain-free if we
    > havent ground up any in a bit. *I'll admit, grinding my own is a heck
    > of a lot cheaper than grain-free canned dog food. *Both of my dogs
    > *and* my cat have grain issues though Daisy-chan (cat) isn't *too* bad
    > about it.



    I'm pissed. I just typed a rather long and possibly boring
    response to your post and sent it off but it never took. The two
    posts I typed after that did show up. It could have been my fault.
    But now I'm pissed because I want to re-tell that same story, the one
    that didn't show up, but I'm not sure I've got the energy. I'll try
    to make it short.

    I have never owned a freezer in my life. In fact, I've lived in
    furnished apartments all my adult life and never had a refrigerator
    with a separate freezer door till about 12 years ago. The one they
    had in here was like all the others I'd ever had, the tiny metal
    freezer inside the fridge. It worked but would not keep ice cream
    hard. So one day when I had a hundred bucks to spare I started
    looking in the paper for a good used refrigerator, a newer one with a
    separate freezer door.

    I went out in the cab to check it out. I didn't take a tape
    measure because I've never owned one. This fridge was huge. But I
    never thought about it, just said ok I'll take it. So the guy said he
    and his buddy would deliver it. When they got here it took all 3 of
    us an hour to get it up the steps. I live on the top floor (3rd),
    with no elevator and really narrow steps that twist into the
    hallways. A real bitch getting that thing up the steps.

    So I get it plugged in and I'm delighted that finally I have a
    freezer that works. The thing was so huge that it hardly didn't fit
    into the kitchen. Pretty stupid actually.

    So, unrelated to that, or so I thought, a few months later I
    noticed my electric bill had gone from the low $20s up to the $40 and
    even to $50 on one occasion, and I don't use air conditioning. I
    called the company and told them they were probably getting a false
    reading. I really believed that was the case.

    Then one day about a year later I got up to get something from
    the fridge and found that it was warm. I opened the freezer and the
    ice cubes were melted. The fridge was shot. I told the manager about
    it and they said it would be more cost effective for them to just get
    me a new one from Sears than to refurbish an older one.

    The new one from Sears seemed cheap because it was light and
    plastic-like. But it works really well. Anyway, about two months
    after putting in the new fridge I got my electric bill one day and saw
    it was down below $20. That's when it hit me. The big fridge was
    dying. It was sucking in too much electricity. Sure, it was huge,
    but the bill did not skyrocket when I first got it, only when it
    started to falter, which I never noticed till it went all the way
    out.

    Anyway, I've seen actual freezers but have never owned one or
    the space for it either. So you try out your possibly poisoned meat
    on your dogs first, is that it? Like a King who has a peasant sample
    his food before eating it himself, to test for poison or disease. Is
    that it? No really, if I had a dog, I'd make my own dog food too.
    It's probably even cheaper than buying it in the can or box. In my
    teens I had a dog with diarrhea. The doctor told me to boil hamberger
    meat with shredded wheat, equal parts, and sure enough, in just a few
    days the problem was gone. Thanks for your post. I hope this one
    takes.

    TJ


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