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Thread: cotija cheese

  1. #1
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default cotija cheese


    I grew bored with my ultra gringo quesadillas, made with low-moisture
    mozzarella, and decided to liven them up with a little cotija. What
    a difference! Maybe the jalapenos helped too. And ground beef & onions
    and garlic and green and red peppers...

    On an unrelated note, my five-year-old explained that he likes ketchup
    and mustard on his hamburger because they help make it stick together.


  2. #2
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese


    "tert in seattle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I grew bored with my ultra gringo quesadillas, made with low-moisture
    > mozzarella, and decided to liven them up with a little cotija. What
    > a difference! Maybe the jalapenos helped too. And ground beef & onions
    > and garlic and green and red peppers...
    >
    > On an unrelated note, my five-year-old explained that he likes ketchup
    > and mustard on his hamburger because they help make it stick together.


    Good food stylists make a lot of money these days...

    pavane



  3. #3
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    On 10/11/2012 10:25 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
    > I grew bored with my ultra gringo quesadillas, made with low-moisture
    > mozzarella, and decided to liven them up with a little cotija. What
    > a difference! Maybe the jalapenos helped too. And ground beef & onions
    > and garlic and green and red peppers...
    >
    > On an unrelated note, my five-year-old explained that he likes ketchup
    > and mustard on his hamburger because they help make it stick together.
    >


    I love Cotija cheese in quesadillas. We had them last night for dinner.

    Livened them up with some sauteed mushrooms and onions and fresh baby
    spinach. Used a "Mexican" cheese shredded cheese mix and cotija. They
    were yummy

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    On Fri, 12 Oct 2012 17:14:46 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I love Cotija cheese in quesadillas.


    Is that the one that's like feta? I just point to what I want or ask
    which one most closely resembles x, because I still haven't memorized
    the what's what.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  5. #5
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    sf wrote:
    > On Fri, 12 Oct 2012 17:14:46 -0500, Janet Wilder
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I love Cotija cheese in quesadillas.

    >
    > Is that the one that's like feta? I just point to what I want or ask
    > which one most closely resembles x, because I still haven't memorized
    > the what's what.


    that's it, the crumbly stuff that doesn't melt

    I have a question -- why do quesadillas at restaurants almost always suck?
    I can't remember the last good one I had ... actually can't remember the
    last time I ordered one, must have been more than a couple years ago.


  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 05:47:14 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    > > On Fri, 12 Oct 2012 17:14:46 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I love Cotija cheese in quesadillas.

    > >
    > > Is that the one that's like feta? I just point to what I want or ask
    > > which one most closely resembles x, because I still haven't memorized
    > > the what's what.

    >
    > that's it, the crumbly stuff that doesn't melt
    >
    > I have a question -- why do quesadillas at restaurants almost always suck?
    > I can't remember the last good one I had ... actually can't remember the
    > last time I ordered one, must have been more than a couple years ago.


    Can't help you there... maybe it's the cheese? I haven't ordered a
    quesadilla at a restaurant since my kids were really little (like
    under 4). They're in their 30's now, so that gives you an idea about
    how long it's been. Quesadillas are too easy to make at home to be
    wasting money on them in a restaurant when there's so much else I can
    order.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  7. #7
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    On 10/13/2012 12:47 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    > sf wrote:
    >> On Fri, 12 Oct 2012 17:14:46 -0500, Janet Wilder
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I love Cotija cheese in quesadillas.

    >>
    >> Is that the one that's like feta? I just point to what I want or ask
    >> which one most closely resembles x, because I still haven't memorized
    >> the what's what.

    >
    > that's it, the crumbly stuff that doesn't melt
    >
    > I have a question -- why do quesadillas at restaurants almost always suck?
    > I can't remember the last good one I had ... actually can't remember the
    > last time I ordered one, must have been more than a couple years ago.
    >


    I get a firmer version here and it's wonderful for grating. I grate
    some on top of the Jack for quesadillas.

    Last Tuesday I had them for lunch at a local restaurant. They had green
    peppers, mushrooms and onions inside as well as the cheese. They were
    delicious.

    They have to be served immediately after being made or they get too hard
    and the cheese starts to firm back up. A good Mexican restaurant will
    know that and will time delivery to the table accordingly.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  8. #8
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese


    "tert in seattle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I grew bored with my ultra gringo quesadillas, made with low-moisture
    > mozzarella, and decided to liven them up with a little cotija. What
    > a difference! Maybe the jalapenos helped too. And ground beef & onions
    > and garlic and green and red peppers...
    >
    > On an unrelated note, my five-year-old explained that he likes ketchup
    > and mustard on his hamburger because they help make it stick together.
    >


    why is it that 5 year olds can see things so clearly? And why is it that
    that ability becomes lost?



  9. #9
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I get a firmer version here and it's wonderful for grating. I grate
    > some on top of the Jack for quesadillas.


    What brands of cotija can you get? I really liked the Cacique packed in
    rounds, but they have disappeared from stores here. I can get precrumbled
    but it never tastes right. Recently I bought it in wedge form from El
    Viajero brand. A little saltier, but very tasty. I didn't try grating it but
    it seems too crumbly for that. Seems like there should be a Supremo offering
    but I haven't see it in the hispanic stores.

    MartyB



  10. #10
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 12:27:01 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> I get a firmer version here and it's wonderful for grating. I grate
    >> some on top of the Jack for quesadillas.

    >
    >What brands of cotija can you get? I really liked the Cacique packed in
    >rounds, but they have disappeared from stores here. I can get precrumbled
    >but it never tastes right. Recently I bought it in wedge form from El
    >Viajero brand. A little saltier, but very tasty. I didn't try grating it but
    >it seems too crumbly for that. Seems like there should be a Supremo offering
    >but I haven't see it in the hispanic stores.


    Doesn't sound like anything I'd miss.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotija_cheese

  11. #11
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    On 10/13/2012 12:27 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> I get a firmer version here and it's wonderful for grating. I grate
    >> some on top of the Jack for quesadillas.

    >
    > What brands of cotija can you get? I really liked the Cacique packed in
    > rounds, but they have disappeared from stores here. I can get precrumbled
    > but it never tastes right. Recently I bought it in wedge form from El
    > Viajero brand. A little saltier, but very tasty. I didn't try grating it but
    > it seems too crumbly for that. Seems like there should be a Supremo offering
    > but I haven't see it in the hispanic stores.
    >
    > MartyB
    >
    >

    Hill Country Fair which I believe is an HEB house brand

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  12. #12
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> I get a firmer version here and it's wonderful for grating. I grate
    >> some on top of the Jack for quesadillas.

    >
    > What brands of cotija can you get? I really liked the Cacique packed in
    > rounds, but they have disappeared from stores here. I can get precrumbled
    > but it never tastes right. Recently I bought it in wedge form from El
    > Viajero brand. A little saltier, but very tasty. I didn't try grating it but
    > it seems too crumbly for that. Seems like there should be a Supremo offering
    > but I haven't see it in the hispanic stores.
    >
    > MartyB



    http://fresh.amazon.com/product?asin=B001BJR1QA&qid=0



  13. #13
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    Pico Rico wrote:
    >
    > "tert in seattle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:sl[email protected]..
    >>
    >> I grew bored with my ultra gringo quesadillas, made with low-moisture
    >> mozzarella, and decided to liven them up with a little cotija. What
    >> a difference! Maybe the jalapenos helped too. And ground beef & onions
    >> and garlic and green and red peppers...
    >>
    >> On an unrelated note, my five-year-old explained that he likes ketchup
    >> and mustard on his hamburger because they help make it stick together.
    >>

    >
    > why is it that 5 year olds can see things so clearly? And why is it that
    > that ability becomes lost?


    they're also keenly aware of when we adults contradict ourselves and they
    are uninhibited about letting us know


  14. #14
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 12:27:01 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I get a firmer version here and it's wonderful for grating. I grate
    >>> some on top of the Jack for quesadillas.

    >>
    >> What brands of cotija can you get? I really liked the Cacique packed
    >> in rounds, but they have disappeared from stores here. I can get
    >> precrumbled but it never tastes right. Recently I bought it in wedge
    >> form from El Viajero brand. A little saltier, but very tasty. I
    >> didn't try grating it but it seems too crumbly for that. Seems like
    >> there should be a Supremo offering but I haven't see it in the
    >> hispanic stores.

    >
    > Doesn't sound like anything I'd miss.


    That's no surprise.

    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotija_cheese


    Cotija is nice for both flavor and texture and is not nearly so flavorless
    as the wiki article implies. Score one for the wiki-doesn't-know-everything
    crowd.

    MartyB



  15. #15
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    tert in seattle <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >> Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I get a firmer version here and it's wonderful for grating. I grate
    >>> some on top of the Jack for quesadillas.

    >>
    >> What brands of cotija can you get? I really liked the Cacique packed
    >> in rounds, but they have disappeared from stores here. I can get
    >> precrumbled but it never tastes right. Recently I bought it in wedge
    >> form from El Viajero brand. A little saltier, but very tasty. I
    >> didn't try grating it but it seems too crumbly for that. Seems like
    >> there should be a Supremo offering but I haven't see it in the
    >> hispanic stores.
    >>
    >> MartyB

    >
    >
    > http://fresh.amazon.com/product?asin=B001BJR1QA&qid=0


    If you look at the label in the photo just at a glance, it seems to say
    Crapola. ;-)

    Seriously, Chapala is a brand I haven't seen around here. Maybe I need to
    expand my list of hispanic grocers.

    MartyB



  16. #16
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:06:22 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >> On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 12:27:01 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> I get a firmer version here and it's wonderful for grating. I grate
    >>>> some on top of the Jack for quesadillas.
    >>>
    >>> What brands of cotija can you get? I really liked the Cacique packed
    >>> in rounds, but they have disappeared from stores here. I can get
    >>> precrumbled but it never tastes right. Recently I bought it in wedge
    >>> form from El Viajero brand. A little saltier, but very tasty. I
    >>> didn't try grating it but it seems too crumbly for that. Seems like
    >>> there should be a Supremo offering but I haven't see it in the
    >>> hispanic stores.

    >>
    >> Doesn't sound like anything I'd miss.

    >
    >That's no surprise.
    >
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotija_cheese

    >
    >Cotija is nice for both flavor and texture and is not nearly so flavorless
    >as the wiki article implies. Score one for the wiki-doesn't-know-everything
    >crowd.
    >
    >MartyB



    Smelly cheeses don't bother me but I don't like salty cheese... I
    can't stand fehta... anytime a greek salad comes with the meal I tell
    them to hold the fehta and add extra olives. I like salty foods but
    not salty cheeses. Cheese is plenty salty enough, I don't like
    excessively salty cheese. I don't consider fehta edible, I
    especially don't like its texture.

  17. #17
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > tert in seattle <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >>> Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> I get a firmer version here and it's wonderful for grating. I grate
    >>>> some on top of the Jack for quesadillas.
    >>>
    >>> What brands of cotija can you get? I really liked the Cacique packed
    >>> in rounds, but they have disappeared from stores here. I can get
    >>> precrumbled but it never tastes right. Recently I bought it in wedge
    >>> form from El Viajero brand. A little saltier, but very tasty. I
    >>> didn't try grating it but it seems too crumbly for that. Seems like
    >>> there should be a Supremo offering but I haven't see it in the
    >>> hispanic stores.
    >>>
    >>> MartyB

    >>
    >>
    >> http://fresh.amazon.com/product?asin=B001BJR1QA&qid=0

    >
    > If you look at the label in the photo just at a glance, it seems to say
    > Crapola. ;-)
    >
    > Seriously, Chapala is a brand I haven't seen around here. Maybe I need to
    > expand my list of hispanic grocers.
    >
    > MartyB



    haha Farty made a funny! :-) :-) ;-)


  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:06:22 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:

    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotija_cheese

    >
    > Cotija is nice for both flavor and texture and is not nearly so flavorless
    > as the wiki article implies. Score one for the wiki-doesn't-know-everything
    > crowd.


    I've sampled a wiode varity of cotija cheeses. They vary wildly.
    Some even border on being motzarella-like, while others are crumbly
    and taste as if they have a bit of age to them and are sharper. And
    every degree in between.

    -sw

  19. #19
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    On 10/13/2012 9:57 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

    > Smelly cheeses don't bother me but I don't like salty cheese... I
    > can't stand fehta... anytime a greek salad comes with the meal I tell
    > them to hold the fehta and add extra olives. I like salty foods but
    > not salty cheeses. Cheese is plenty salty enough, I don't like
    > excessively salty cheese. I don't consider fehta edible, I
    > especially don't like its texture.


    You would like Oaxaca, or asadero cheese, it is not salty and it melts
    nice and smooth.

    Becca



  20. #20
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: cotija cheese

    On Mon, 15 Oct 2012 07:49:18 -0500, Ema Nymton <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 10/13/2012 9:57 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >> Smelly cheeses don't bother me but I don't like salty cheese... I
    >> can't stand fehta... anytime a greek salad comes with the meal I tell
    >> them to hold the fehta and add extra olives. I like salty foods but
    >> not salty cheeses. Cheese is plenty salty enough, I don't like
    >> excessively salty cheese. I don't consider fehta edible, I
    >> especially don't like its texture.

    >
    >You would like Oaxaca, or asadero cheese, it is not salty and it melts
    >nice and smooth.
    >
    >Becca


    Thank you, I will look for those.
    >


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