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Thread: cotechino recipes?

  1. #1
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default cotechino recipes?

    I've just finished stuufing a batch of cotechino and I was wondering
    whether any RFCers have any favorite uses for it. I've used it in
    bollito misto and cooked with lentils or canellini in the past. Does
    anyone have any other suggestions?

    D.M.

  2. #2
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: cotechino recipes?

    "Don Martinich" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]met.ac.uk...

    > I've just finished stuufing a batch of cotechino and I was wondering
    > whether any RFCers have any favorite uses for it. I've used it in
    > bollito misto and cooked with lentils or canellini in the past. Does
    > anyone have any other suggestions?


    Well, just a couple. My granny, mother side, used to cook "cotechino in
    crosta" which is a cotechino wrapped in bread dough and baked. This way the
    fat of the cotechino all remain trapped inside, very very arthery clogging
    recipe. One could make that lighter by boiling the cotechino half-way and
    then wrapping and baking it.
    A common way of serving cotechino is with sides like potato puree or boiled
    potatoes. Lentils also are very common, expecially during the christmas
    days. Cotechino in bollito misto is the main way to eat it hereabouts, maybe
    with lettuce salads and "mostarda", which is a kind of pickled fruits,
    pickled in a mustard based sweet sauce.




  3. #3
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: cotechino recipes?

    Don Martinich <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've just finished stuufing a batch of cotechino and I was wondering
    > whether any RFCers have any favorite uses for it. I've used it in
    > bollito misto and cooked with lentils or canellini in the past. Does
    > anyone have any other suggestions?


    Just cooking cotechino (commercial in my case) with lentils is my
    favourite way, but I once made a kind of a roulade (involtino,
    paupiette, zraza, etc.) using a cotechino, which is traditional and goes
    under such names as "cotechino in galera" (in prison), "cotechino in
    camicia" (in nightshirt), or "cotechino in fagotto" (in a bassoon).
    People who ate it with me liked it well enough, but I did not, but then
    I tend to dislike any rouladen made with a meat "casing". This general
    dish is typical of Emilia and now also of Romagna. Either veal or beef
    is typically used for the "secondary casing". The additions, usually
    including a typical battuto of onions, carrots and celery, vary a bit,
    some including pancetta, some prosciutto, some porcini mushrooms. I no
    longer have the exact recipe I used (I think it included mushrooms), but
    here is another one, from the latest Accademia Italiana della Cucina
    recipe compilation. I can post some other similar ones.

    Victor

    Cotechino in galera
    Cotechino "in prison"
    For 6 persons

    Cotechino is a fresh pork sausage that contains pork rind or cooked pork
    skin (_cotico_), which imparts an unctuous texture. It is often boiled
    and served with lentils. Here the cotechino is "in prison" because it
    is inside the rolled-up beef. This dish is typical of Modena. For the
    wine use Sangiovese di Romagna.

    1 precooked cotechino, weighing about 1 lb
    1 lb beef in a single slice, pounded thin
    4 oz. pancetta, sliced
    3 cups red wine
    2/3 cup chopped carrots
    1/2 cup chopped onions
    2/3 cup chopped celery
    2 bay leaves
    1/4 lb (1/2 cup) unsalted butter
    4 cups beef broth
    1/2 lb peeled plum tomatoes
    Pinch salt

    Remove the meat from the casing of the cotechino.

    Spread this meat over the slice of beef and roll up the beef; cover it
    with the slices of pancetta, then tie closed with kitchen twine.

    Mix the red wine with the carrots, onions, celery, and bay leaves; add
    the meat and marinate for 5 to 6 hours in the refrigerator.

    Heat the butter in a pan and add the meat, browning it.

    Pour in the broth, then the marinade.

    Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer. After about 1 hour,
    add the tomatoes and salt.

    Simmer for about 3 hours. Remove the meat from the sauce and pass the
    sauce through an sieve. Serve the meat sliced with the sauce.


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