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Thread: cooling leftovers

  1. #1
    Jay Guest

    Default cooling leftovers

    Should this be done... on the bench (fending off the cats), in the
    microwave (turned off) to avoid bugs etc or in the fridge? I read
    somewhere that foods should be cooled in the fridge uncovered in the
    fridge then covered when cooled. I thought this drastic change of temp
    would be bad. I also think the smells from whatever is cooling may
    contaminate other stuff in the fridge?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: cooling leftovers

    The message
    <[email protected]>
    from Jay <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > Should this be done... on the bench (fending off the cats), in the
    > microwave (turned off) to avoid bugs etc or in the fridge? I read
    > somewhere that foods should be cooled in the fridge uncovered in the
    > fridge then covered when cooled. I thought this drastic change of temp
    > would be bad.


    It's bad for other fridge contents to be warmed up, which increases
    bacterial growth. . I cool food on the kitchen worktop, covered up...if
    it cooked in a pan, just leave it in the pan, lid on, off the heat. Or
    just upturn a big bowl over the cooling dish to protect it from pets,
    flies, airborne bacteria. When it's cool I transfer it to something
    clean and covered before putting it in the fridge.
    If you have hot summers , a cold stone slab is useful for faster cooling.

    Cooked meat should always be stored on a separate shelf from raw meat
    and raw meat should be at the bottom of the fridge away from anything
    like salad or foods eaten raw.

    Janet

  3. #3
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default Re: cooling leftovers

    Jay wrote:
    > Should this be done... on the bench (fending off the cats), in the
    > microwave (turned off) to avoid bugs etc or in the fridge? I read
    > somewhere that foods should be cooled in the fridge uncovered in the
    > fridge then covered when cooled. I thought this drastic change of temp
    > would be bad. I also think the smells from whatever is cooling may
    > contaminate other stuff in the fridge?



    What sort of food?
    What sort of fridge?
    How much food versus how much space in the fridge?


    The idea is to cool the food as quickly as possible. Putting an
    enormous pot of steaming soup stock into a small refrigerator isn't
    going to cool it quickly. The fridge will heat up, and it will take a
    long time for the motor to bring it down to temperature. If you had an
    efficient walk-in refrigerator, it would be no problem.


    At home, you pour the soup stock into a shallow tray so the heat can
    dissipate faster, then pour it back into an upright container when it is
    room temperature. You can use ice under the container too. That's for
    something important like soup stock.


    For leftover vegetables, I just cover them with plastic wrap and stick
    them in the fridge right away. Same for small amounts of broiled meat.


    I never thought of the microwave as a bug-free place for cooling, but it
    makes sense. Why not?


    For pies or baked goods where the main concern is keeping dirt, dust,
    and bugs off, I use the countertop and a clean kitchen cloth.


    With modern refrigeration, I don't find smells to be a problem. An item
    can be smelly when it's in there but the smell goes away when the
    garlic, fish or spices are removed.


    --Lia


  4. #4
    Edwin Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: cooling leftovers


    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > The idea is to cool the food as quickly as possible.
    > I never thought of the microwave as a bug-free place for cooling, but it
    > makes sense. Why not?


    Contradictory statements. If you want to cool food as quickly as possible,
    you don't put it into a box with no air circulation that will then build up
    heat.



  5. #5
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: cooling leftovers


    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ..

    > The idea is to cool the food as quickly as possible. Putting an enormous
    > pot of steaming soup stock into a small refrigerator isn't going to cool
    > it quickly. The fridge will heat up, and it will take a long time for the
    > motor to bring it down to temperature. If you had an efficient walk-in
    > refrigerator, it would be no problem.
    >
    >
    > At home, you pour the soup stock into a shallow tray so the heat can
    > dissipate faster, then pour it back into an upright container when it is
    > room temperature. You can use ice under the container too. That's for
    > something important like soup stock.


    Pfft. I leave mine in the pot until it is cool enough to pick up with my
    bare hands and then put it in the refrigerator. Nobody's ever gotten sick
    and it sure tastes great next time we have it.



  6. #6
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: cooling leftovers

    On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 08:31:53 -0400, Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

    > "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >> The idea is to cool the food as quickly as possible.
    >> I never thought of the microwave as a bug-free place for cooling, but it
    >> makes sense. Why not?

    >
    > Contradictory statements. If you want to cool food as quickly as possible,
    > you don't put it into a box with no air circulation that will then build up
    > heat.


    i was thinking the same thing. i guess it depends on how rampant and
    energetic your bugs are.

    your pal,
    blake

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