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Thread: Cooking with Yogurt

  1. #1
    hungrygirl Guest

    Default Cooking with Yogurt


    Can you freeze foods cooked with yogurt?
    Sometimes a recipe calls for yogurt in the gravy or marinade.

    I know fresh yogurt is ok to freeze, but is cooked yogurt also ok?

    Thanks!




    --
    hungrygirl

  2. #2
    Virginia Tadrzynski Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt


    "hungrygirl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > Can you freeze foods cooked with yogurt?
    > Sometimes a recipe calls for yogurt in the gravy or marinade.
    >
    > I know fresh yogurt is ok to freeze, but is cooked yogurt also ok?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > hungrygirl


    my experience is that most dairy separates when frozen, so I haven't tried
    freezing yogurt. DIL freezes yogurt cups to give to darling grandson, but
    when you open them after thawing, they are watery...I would think that would
    be the same if you cooked with it.
    -ginny




  3. #3
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    In article <[email protected]>,
    hungrygirl <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Can you freeze foods cooked with yogurt?
    > Sometimes a recipe calls for yogurt in the gravy or marinade.
    >
    > I know fresh yogurt is ok to freeze, but is cooked yogurt also ok?


    Not to answer your question, but, from sad experience, it's not a good
    idea to "cook" yogurt. Once your dish is cooked, add the yogurt (same
    goes for sour cream) and bring to serving temperature carefully.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  4. #4
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 07:19:43 -0700, Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > hungrygirl <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Can you freeze foods cooked with yogurt?
    >> Sometimes a recipe calls for yogurt in the gravy or marinade.
    >>
    >> I know fresh yogurt is ok to freeze, but is cooked yogurt also ok?

    >
    >Not to answer your question, but, from sad experience, it's not a good
    >idea to "cook" yogurt. Once your dish is cooked, add the yogurt (same
    >goes for sour cream) and bring to serving temperature carefully.


    Yes indeed, I use it a great deal in Indian food and you need to be
    vigilant or the dish can be ruined.

  5. #5
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    Stu wrote:
    >
    >>> I know fresh yogurt is ok to freeze, but is cooked yogurt also ok?

    >> Not to answer your question, but, from sad experience, it's not a good
    >> idea to "cook" yogurt. Once your dish is cooked, add the yogurt (same
    >> goes for sour cream) and bring to serving temperature carefully.

    >
    > Yes indeed, I use it a great deal in Indian food and you need to be
    > vigilant or the dish can be ruined.


    The only cooking I do with yogurt is tandoori chicken. The meat is
    marinated in the yogurt. It works like magic to tenderize the flesh.
    When I went to a cooking demonstration the chef did a pumpkin and
    butternut squash soup that uses cream. The cream is added at the end and
    he stressed that you should only add the cream to what you are going to
    use right away because it will separate if you re-heat it.

  6. #6
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    On Jun 24, 11:17*am, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > Stu wrote:
    >
    > >>> I know fresh yogurt is ok to freeze, but is cooked yogurt also ok?
    > >> Not to answer your question, but, from sad experience, it's not a good
    > >> idea to "cook" yogurt. *Once your dish is cooked, add the yogurt (same
    > >> goes for sour cream) and bring to serving temperature carefully.


    I've had pretty good luck stabilizing the yogurt or sour cream with
    some
    kind of starch. Flour, cornstarch, chickpea flour, etc. It's still
    tetchy,
    but not nearly as likely to curdle.

    > > Yes indeed, I use it a great deal in Indian food and you need to be
    > > vigilant or the dish can be ruined.


    I wouldn't call it ruined. Unattractive, to be sure, but still quite
    edible.

    > The only cooking I do with yogurt is tandoori chicken. The meat is
    > marinated in the yogurt. It works like magic to tenderize the flesh.
    > When I went to a cooking demonstration the chef did a pumpkin and
    > butternut squash soup that uses cream. The cream is added at the end and
    > he stressed that you should only add the cream to what you are going to
    > use right away because it will separate if you re-heat it.


    Really? In my experience, cream is very robust. I can boil it to
    reduce
    it in a sauce, refrigerate the sauce, and reheat it without peril.

    That's heavy cream, mind you. Not the ultra-pastuerized stuff,
    either,
    just regular old pasteurized.

    Cindy Hamilton

  7. #7
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    On Jun 24, 7:10*am, "Virginia Tadrzynski" <ta...@ptd.net> wrote:

    > my experience is that most dairy separates when frozen, so I haven't tried
    > freezing yogurt. DIL freezes yogurt cups to give to darling grandson, but
    > when you open them after thawing, they are watery...


    I wonder what would happen if she started with Greek-style yogurt,
    which has been dripped through a cloth for extra denseness.

  8. #8
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    "Virginia Tadrzynski" wrote:
    >
    > my experience is that most dairy separates when frozen, so I haven't tried
    > freezing yogurt. DIL freezes yogurt cups to give to darling grandson, but
    > when you open them after thawing, they are watery...


    I've been freezing yogurt for more years than I care to count...
    yogurt freezes beautifully... most every stupidmarkets sells frozen
    yogurt same as ice cream, in containers/on a stick. You're not
    supposed to thaw frozen yogurt out in the hot sun until it's a puddle.

  9. #9
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    On Jun 24, 3:51*pm, brooklyn1 <gravesen...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > "Virginia Tadrzynski" wrote:
    >
    > > my experience is that most dairy separates when frozen, so I haven't tried
    > > freezing yogurt. DIL freezes yogurt cups to give to darling grandson, but
    > > when you open them after thawing, they are watery...

    >
    > I've been freezing yogurt for more years than I care to count...
    > yogurt freezes beautifully... most every stupidmarkets sells frozen
    > yogurt same as ice cream, in containers/on a stick. *You're not
    > supposed to thaw frozen yogurt out in the hot sun until it's a puddle.


    What if she froze them so that the kid could take them to school with
    him? Should she pack dry ice in his lunch bag?

  10. #10
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 17:14:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> "Virginia Tadrzynski" wrote:
    >>
    >> > my experience is that most dairy separates when frozen, so I haven't tried
    >> > freezing yogurt. DIL freezes yogurt cups to give to darling grandson, but
    >> > when you open them after thawing, they are watery...

    >>
    >> I've been freezing yogurt for more years than I care to count...
    >> yogurt freezes beautifully... most every stupidmarkets sells frozen
    >> yogurt same as ice cream, in containers/on a stick. *You're not
    >> supposed to thaw frozen yogurt out in the hot sun until it's a puddle.

    >
    >What if she froze them so that the kid could take them to school with
    >him? Should she pack dry ice in his lunch bag?


    Dry ice... are you really so dumb or are you simply being a dumb ****.

  11. #11
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    Sheldon said::

    > On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 17:14:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    >
    > <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >brooklyn1 wrote:
    > >> "Virginia Tadrzynski" wrote:

    >
    > >> > my experience is that most dairy separates when frozen, so I haven'ttried
    > >> > freezing yogurt. DIL freezes yogurt cups to give to darling grandson, but
    > >> > when you open them after thawing, they are watery...

    >
    > >> I've been freezing yogurt for more years than I care to count...
    > >> yogurt freezes beautifully... most every stupidmarkets sells frozen
    > >> yogurt same as ice cream, in containers/on a stick. *You're not
    > >> supposed to thaw frozen yogurt out in the hot sun until it's a puddle.

    >
    > >What if she froze them so that the kid could take them to school with
    > >him? Should she pack dry ice in his lunch bag?

    >
    > Dry ice... are you really so dumb or are you simply being a dumb ****.



    LOL...sheer stoopidity is still alive..."dry ice" in a rugrat's
    lunchbox...

    <chortle>


    --
    Best
    Greg

  12. #12
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    On Jun 24, 7:11*pm, Gregory Morrow <gregorymor...@earthlink.net>
    wrote:
    > Sheldon said::
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 17:14:44 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888

    >
    > > <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > >brooklyn1 wrote:
    > > >> "Virginia Tadrzynski" wrote:

    >
    > > >> > my experience is that most dairy separates when frozen, so I haven't tried
    > > >> > freezing yogurt. DIL freezes yogurt cups to give to darling grandson, but
    > > >> > when you open them after thawing, they are watery...

    >
    > > >> I've been freezing yogurt for more years than I care to count...
    > > >> yogurt freezes beautifully... most every stupidmarkets sells frozen
    > > >> yogurt same as ice cream, in containers/on a stick. *You're not
    > > >> supposed to thaw frozen yogurt out in the hot sun until it's a puddle.

    >
    > > >What if she froze them so that the kid could take them to school with
    > > >him? Should she pack dry ice in his lunch bag?

    >
    > > Dry ice... are you really so dumb or are you simply being a dumb ****.

    >
    > LOL...sheer stoopidity is still alive..."dry ice" in a rugrat's
    > lunchbox...
    >
    > <chortle>
    >


    No kid's gonna wanna eat room temp yogurt. But if he carries it
    frozen, it should thaw by lunch time.

  13. #13
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    On Jun 24, 10:19*am, Dan Abel <da...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > In article <hungrygirl.668c638.807...@foodbanter.com>,
    >
    > *hungrygirl <hungrygirl.668c638.807...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > > Can you freeze foods cooked with yogurt?
    > > Sometimes a recipe calls for yogurt in the gravy or marinade.

    >
    > > I know fresh yogurt is ok to freeze, but is cooked yogurt also ok?

    >
    > Not to answer your question, but, from sad experience, it's not a good
    > idea to "cook" yogurt. *Once your dish is cooked, add the yogurt (same
    > goes for sour cream) and bring to serving temperature carefully.
    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel
    > Petaluma, California USA
    > da...@sonic.net


    Yeah - the yogurt breaks up into a zillion tiny white spots in your
    sauce or whatever.

  14. #14
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    Kalmia wrote:
    > On Jun 24, 10:19 am, Dan Abel <da...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >> In article <hungrygirl.668c638.807...@foodbanter.com>,
    >>
    >> hungrygirl <hungrygirl.668c638.807...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    >>> Can you freeze foods cooked with yogurt?
    >>> Sometimes a recipe calls for yogurt in the gravy or marinade.
    >>> I know fresh yogurt is ok to freeze, but is cooked yogurt also ok?

    >> Not to answer your question, but, from sad experience, it's not a good
    >> idea to "cook" yogurt. Once your dish is cooked, add the yogurt (same
    >> goes for sour cream) and bring to serving temperature carefully.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Dan Abel
    >> Petaluma, California USA
    >> da...@sonic.net

    >
    > Yeah - the yogurt breaks up into a zillion tiny white spots in your
    > sauce or whatever.


    two words- creme fraiche!

  15. #15
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    Kalmia wrote on Fri, 25 Jun 2010 07:08:22 -0700 (PDT):

    > On Jun 24, 10:19 am, Dan Abel <da...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >> In article <hungrygirl.668c638.807...@foodbanter.com>,
    >>
    >> hungrygirl <hungrygirl.668c638.807...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > >> Can you freeze foods cooked with yogurt?
    > >> Sometimes a recipe calls for yogurt in the gravy or
    > >> marinade.

    >>
    > >> I know fresh yogurt is ok to freeze, but is cooked yogurt
    > >> also ok?

    >>
    >> Not to answer your question, but, from sad experience, it's
    >> not a good idea to "cook" yogurt. Once your dish is cooked,
    >> add the yogurt (same goes for sour cream) and bring to
    >> serving temperature carefully.
    >>


    >Yeah - the yogurt breaks up into a zillion tiny white spots in your
    >sauce or whatever.


    There are Indian curry dishes that call for long slow cooking with
    yoghurt and I find that even fat-free yoghurt is quite satisfactory if
    the yoghurt is premixed with some flour.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > LOL...sheer stoopidity is still alive..."dry ice" in a rugrat's
    > > lunchbox...
    > >
    > > <chortle>
    > >

    >
    > No kid's gonna wanna eat room temp yogurt. But if he carries it
    > frozen, it should thaw by lunch time.


    Just use some Blue Ice... Thawed frozen yogurt, unwhipped, tends to
    break. Ick.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  17. #17
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    On Jun 25, 7:28*am, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.net>
    wrote:
    > *Kalmia *wrote *on Fri, 25 Jun 2010 07:08:22 -0700 (PDT):
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jun 24, 10:19 am, Dan Abel <da...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > >> In article <hungrygirl.668c638.807...@foodbanter.com>,

    >
    > >> *hungrygirl <hungrygirl.668c638.807...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > > >> Can you freeze foods cooked with yogurt?
    > > >> Sometimes a recipe calls for yogurt in the gravy or
    > > >> marinade.

    >
    > > >> I know fresh yogurt is ok to freeze, but is cooked yogurt
    > > >> also ok?

    >
    > >> Not to answer your question, but, from sad experience, it's
    > >> not a good idea to "cook" yogurt. *Once your dish is cooked,
    > >> add the yogurt (same goes for sour cream) and bring to
    > >> serving temperature carefully.

    >
    > >Yeah - the yogurt breaks up into a zillion tiny white spots in your
    > >sauce or whatever.

    >
    > There are Indian curry dishes that call for long slow cooking with
    > yoghurt and I find that even fat-free yoghurt is quite satisfactory if
    > the yoghurt is premixed with some flour.
    >


    Fat-free yogurt is chockfull of gelatin.

  18. #18
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    On Jun 25, 8:30*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In article
    > <43468633-8d96-49d0-af1c-c2caea48f...@j4g2000yqh.googlegroups.com>,
    >
    > *spamtrap1888 <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > > LOL...sheer stoopidity is still alive..."dry ice" in a rugrat's
    > > > lunchbox...

    >
    > > > <chortle>

    >
    > > No kid's gonna wanna eat room temp yogurt. But if he carries it
    > > frozen, it should thaw by lunch time.

    >
    > Just use some Blue Ice... Thawed frozen yogurt, unwhipped, tends to
    > break. Ick.


    That would work if the blue ice was sewn into the lunchbag or
    something. Even then I'd figure on buying a lot of replacement blue
    ice. When I was a kid, I carried a bag lunch and brought home nothing.


  19. #19
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt


    "spamtrap1888" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    >>Fat-free yogurt is chockfull of gelatin.


    Mine isn't. It has two ingredients, milk and live bacteria.



  20. #20
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Yogurt

    On Jun 25, 11:39*pm, "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > "spamtrap1888" <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    > >>Fat-free yogurt is chockfull of gelatin.

    >
    > Mine isn't. *It has two ingredients, milk and live bacteria.


    I guess that's why your name is Giusi and not Danone.

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