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Thread: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

  1. #1
    sandi Guest

    Default Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    spray all around the house."

    http://www.diylife.com/2011/01/13/cooking-spray-uses/

  2. #2
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses


    sandi wrote:
    >
    > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    > spray all around the house."
    >
    > http://www.diylife.com/2011/01/13/cooking-spray-uses/


    They missed using Pam as an anti-spatter spray in MIG welding.

  3. #3
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses


    "sandi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4d3e2ec8$0$5652$[email protected]..
    > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    > spray all around the house."


    <snip>

    I haven't bought any cooking spray for years. I can't see why I would need
    it.



  4. #4
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    sandi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    > spray all around the house."
    >
    > http://www.diylife.com/2011/01/13/cooking-spray-uses/



    sandi,

    I wouldn't "spritz" wheel covers with PAM. Getting it on the disc brakes
    could be very dangerous. I'd spray a paper napkin and carefully wipe it
    on, if that. But, due to the centrifugal force of spinning wheels,
    particles of PAM could go flying any and everywhere you might not want
    it.

    Just like PAM's propellant can gum up non-stick pots and pans, so might
    it gum up the works in those DIY ideas. That and possibly attract pests.

    Being a lazy BUM!!!, I bought a can of PAM about 3 years ago, reasoning
    I'd save time and a paper towel not having to apply a higher quality
    cooking oil.

    Best,

    Andy

  5. #5
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    On Jan 25, 7:13*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:

    > Being a lazy BUM!!!, I bought a can of PAM about 3 years ago, reasoning
    > I'd save time and a paper towel not having to apply a higher quality
    > cooking oil.



    Yeah, but, actually, you can control the paper towel method better and
    not have the spray hitting areas outside what you wish to coat. I
    don't buy the Pam stuff. I keep a little Canola in a stainless
    watering can type thing, and just pour a tiny bit onto the paper
    towel. I keep a little olive oil in a cruet for the same purpose.
    Works fine and cheaper too. I also am not crazy about aerosol cans
    around the stove.

    I don't trust the stuff marketed as cooking spray any more than I like
    what they sell as cooking wine. Ugh.

  6. #6
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    On Jan 25, 9:04*am, Kalmia <tweeny90...@mypacks.net> wrote:
    > On Jan 25, 7:13*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >
    > > Being a lazy BUM!!!, I bought a can of PAM about 3 years ago, reasoning
    > > I'd save time and a paper towel not having to apply a higher quality
    > > cooking oil.

    >
    > Yeah, but, actually, you can control the paper towel method better and
    > not have the spray hitting areas outside what you wish to coat. *I
    > don't buy the Pam stuff. *I keep a little Canola in a stainless
    > watering can type thing, and just pour a tiny bit onto the paper
    > towel. *I keep a little olive oil in a cruet for the same purpose.
    > Works fine and cheaper too. *I also am not crazy about aerosol cans
    > around the stove.


    That's why I use Pam in the vicinity of the sink. Hold pan over sink;
    spray. Overspray is cleaned up in the usual course of cleaning
    the sink.

    Cindy Hamilton

  7. #7
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I don't trust the stuff marketed as cooking spray any more than I like
    > what they sell as cooking wine. Ugh.



    Kalmia,

    Heh heh heh heh heh!

    And as if PAM's entire product line is to be believed?
    Serving Size about 1/4 second spray (.3g)
    Serving Size about 1/3 second spray (.3g)

    Let's just whip out the ultra-micro cast iron pans!!!

    Best,

    Andy

  8. #8
    ravenlynne Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    On 1/24/2011 9:00 PM, sandi wrote:
    > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    > spray all around the house."
    >
    > http://www.diylife.com/2011/01/13/cooking-spray-uses/


    That or pledge for shoe shine when I was in the navy. For chloroframs.

    --
    Currently Reading: Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold

  9. #9
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    On Jan 25, 10:41*am, ravenlynne <ravenly...@somecraphere.com> wrote:
    > On 1/24/2011 9:00 PM, sandi wrote:
    >
    > > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    > > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    > > spray all around the house."

    >
    > >http://www.diylife.com/2011/01/13/cooking-spray-uses/

    >
    > That or pledge for shoe shine when I was in the navy. For chloroframs.
    >
    > --
    > Currently Reading: *Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold


    ==
    I believe that "PAM" consists mostly of Canola oil whereas many years
    ago it contained corn oil. Canola oil leaves a sticky, yucky residue
    which I hate and it is hard to clean it from surfaces. A food-quality
    silicone spray works better for many of the "other" uses listed than
    PAM does IMHO.
    ==

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 06:23:28 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > That's why I use Pam in the vicinity of the sink. Hold pan over sink;
    > spray. Overspray is cleaned up in the usual course of cleaning
    > the sink.


    I spray in the sink for the same reason. I'm not afraid of aerosol,
    but I create as little mess on purpose as possible, because I hate to
    clean up.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  11. #11
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    On 1/24/2011 4:00 PM, sandi wrote:
    > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    > spray all around the house."
    >
    > http://www.diylife.com/2011/01/13/cooking-spray-uses/


    You should avoid spraying Pam on your brake rotors - you'll just
    contaminate your brake pads. At least your inside pads will probably be
    OK. My guess is that a combination of Pam and brake dust would be tough
    to clean.

    Pam works fine sprayed on a Turkey before roasting.

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 08:14:15 -1000, dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Pam works fine sprayed on a Turkey before roasting.


    I like that idea.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  13. #13
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses


    'Andy[_15_ Wrote:
    > ;1575386']Kalmia [email protected] wrote:
    > -
    > I don't trust the stuff marketed as cooking spray any more than I like
    > what they sell as cooking wine. Ugh.-
    >
    >
    > Kalmia,
    >
    > Heh heh heh heh heh!
    >
    > And as if PAM's entire product line is to be believed?
    > Serving Size about 1/4 second spray (.3g)
    > Serving Size about 1/3 second spray (.3g)
    >
    > Let's just whip out the ultra-micro cast iron pans!!!
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy


    I use a spritzer filled with junky oil (Pomace olive oil that my SO
    thought was olive oil) to spray on the BBQ grill before I throw
    meat/apargus, peppers on there. Works fine.

    I'll stick with WD-40 and the like for other "mechanical" lubrication.




    --
    Gorio

  14. #14
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    On Jan 25, 1:14*pm, dsi1 <d...@usenet-news.net> wrote:
    > On 1/24/2011 4:00 PM, sandi wrote:
    >
    > > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    > > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    > > spray all around the house."

    >
    > >http://www.diylife.com/2011/01/13/cooking-spray-uses/

    >
    > You should avoid spraying Pam on your brake rotors - you'll just
    > contaminate your brake pads. At least your inside pads will probably be
    > OK. My guess is that a combination of Pam and brake dust would be tough
    > to clean.



    They used to say to use Pam on the bumper to keep lovebugs from
    sticking - baloney. Doesn't work anymore than Skin SO Soft repels
    skeeters. Tried em both.

  15. #15
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses


    Cindy Hamilton <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Jan 25, 9:04 am, Kalmia <tweeny90...@mypacks.net> wrote:
    >> On Jan 25, 7:13 am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Being a lazy BUM!!!, I bought a can of PAM about 3 years ago,
    >>> reasoning I'd save time and a paper towel not having to apply a
    >>> higher quality cooking oil.

    >>
    >> Yeah, but, actually, you can control the paper towel method better
    >> and not have the spray hitting areas outside what you wish to coat. I
    >> don't buy the Pam stuff. I keep a little Canola in a stainless
    >> watering can type thing, and just pour a tiny bit onto the paper
    >> towel. I keep a little olive oil in a cruet for the same purpose.
    >> Works fine and cheaper too. I also am not crazy about aerosol cans
    >> around the stove.

    >
    > That's why I use Pam in the vicinity of the sink. Hold pan over sink;
    > spray. Overspray is cleaned up in the usual course of cleaning
    > the sink.
    >
    > Cindy Hamilton


    That's the only way. If some of the overspray hits the floor and you're in
    the kitchen in your stocking feet, you can get a cheap version of an
    amusement park ride.

    I use cooking spray all the time. Even if I use oil or other fats, it does a
    better job of forming an instant nonstick surface on many different cooking
    surfaces. When I make eggs over easy, I start with a very light spray of Pam
    in a small iron skillet. Then I melt in a little butter, heat, and in go the
    eggs. I can toss flip them and rarely ever break a yolk, even three at a
    time back in the days before my doc warned me off the excess cholesterol. In
    general I find that whenever I want to use toss technique in a pan that
    isn't nonstick by nature, the spray is helpful. However I am careful about
    which spray I buy and try to avoid problem ingredients like lecithin. I
    absolutely never buy flavored cookiong sprays.

    MartyB



  16. #16
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses


    Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Jan 25, 1:14 pm, dsi1 <d...@usenet-news.net> wrote:
    >> On 1/24/2011 4:00 PM, sandi wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    >>> kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    >>> spray all around the house."

    >>
    >>> http://www.diylife.com/2011/01/13/cooking-spray-uses/

    >>
    >> You should avoid spraying Pam on your brake rotors - you'll just
    >> contaminate your brake pads. At least your inside pads will probably
    >> be OK. My guess is that a combination of Pam and brake dust would be
    >> tough to clean.

    >
    >
    > They used to say to use Pam on the bumper to keep lovebugs from
    > sticking - baloney. Doesn't work anymore than Skin SO Soft repels
    > skeeters. Tried em both.


    I once fell victim to the Skin So Soft myth and took some on a camping trip
    instead of good old deet based repellent. I thought those Missouri lake
    mosquitos were going to carry me off.


  17. #17
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    In article <df74ecb7-f734-4a22-b035-
    [email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > On Jan 25, 10:41*am, ravenlynne <ravenly...@somecraphere.com> wrote:
    > > On 1/24/2011 9:00 PM, sandi wrote:
    > >
    > > > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    > > > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    > > > spray all around the house."

    > >
    > > >http://www.diylife.com/2011/01/13/cooking-spray-uses/

    > >
    > > That or pledge for shoe shine when I was in the navy. For chloroframs.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Currently Reading: *Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold

    >
    > ==
    > I believe that "PAM" consists mostly of Canola oil whereas many years
    > ago it contained corn oil. Canola oil leaves a sticky, yucky residue
    > which I hate and it is hard to clean it from surfaces. A food-quality
    > silicone spray works better for many of the "other" uses listed than
    > PAM does IMHO.


    The residue is from lecithin, not canola oil.

  18. #18
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    On Jan 28, 6:46*am, "J. Clarke" <jclarkeuse...@cox.net> wrote:
    > In article <df74ecb7-f734-4a22-b035-
    > 40717e65a...@r16g2000prh.googlegroups.com>, wila...@hotmail.com says...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jan 25, 10:41 am, ravenlynne <ravenly...@somecraphere.com> wrote:
    > > > On 1/24/2011 9:00 PM, sandi wrote:

    >
    > > > > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    > > > > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    > > > > spray all around the house."

    >
    > > > >http://www.diylife.com/2011/01/13/cooking-spray-uses/

    >
    > > > That or pledge for shoe shine when I was in the navy. For chloroframs..

    >
    > > > --
    > > > Currently Reading: Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold

    >
    > > ==
    > > I believe that "PAM" consists mostly of Canola oil whereas many years
    > > ago it contained corn oil. Canola oil leaves a sticky, yucky residue
    > > which I hate and it is hard to clean it from surfaces. A food-quality
    > > silicone spray works better for many of the "other" uses listed than
    > > PAM does IMHO.

    >
    > The residue is from lecithin, not canola oil.


    ==
    Actually, the lecithin is supposed to prevent sticking (read the
    label).

    My brother and his wife had a restaurant and I used to get the empty
    pails which had contained canola oil from them. You could wash and
    wash with heavy duty detergent and hot water and still have that
    sticky feel on the surface of the plastic pail. Damnedest stuff to
    clean up if it gets spilled on a tile floor as well.
    ==

  19. #19
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] in.local...
    > In article <df74ecb7-f734-4a22-b035-
    > [email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>
    >> On Jan 25, 10:41 am, ravenlynne <ravenly...@somecraphere.com> wrote:
    >> > On 1/24/2011 9:00 PM, sandi wrote:
    >> >
    >> > > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    >> > > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use cooking
    >> > > spray all around the house."
    >> >


    Back in the day (1970's) there was a practice called "bagging". Teens
    sprayed PAM and other household toxins into plastic bags and sniffed them to
    obtain a high... much like sniffing model glue. I know of one kid I went to
    school with who died as a result. Alternative uses for cooking spray aren't
    always a great idea.

    Jill


  20. #20
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Spray - Unusual Uses

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] in.local...
    >> In article <df74ecb7-f734-4a22-b035-
    >> [email protected]>, [email protected]
    >> says...
    >>>
    >>> On Jan 25, 10:41 am, ravenlynne <ravenly...@somecraphere.com> wrote:
    >>> > On 1/24/2011 9:00 PM, sandi wrote:
    >>> >
    >>> > > "Want to harness the power of cooking spray? Think outside the
    >>> > > kitchen! There are many clever, budget-friendly ways to use
    >>> > > cooking spray all around the house."
    >>> >

    >
    > Back in the day (1970's) there was a practice called "bagging". Teens
    > sprayed PAM and other household toxins into plastic bags and sniffed
    > them to obtain a high... much like sniffing model glue. I know of one
    > kid I went to school with who died as a result. Alternative uses for
    > cooking spray aren't always a great idea.
    >
    > Jill



    http://alturl.com/9nqy5

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