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Thread: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

  1. #1
    Pringles CheezUms Guest

    Default Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    This is to people who live in or around Wichita, KS:

    Are there any cooking schools or classes around town?
    I'd like to take some.
    They need to be hands-on tho, I'm not all that interested in the
    performer...er...teacher standing up there doing something and talking.
    I want to actually do it myself and really learn how.

    What would also help is if they knew the science behind it. I want to
    know why things happen the way they do. I've read McGee, Woulk, Corriher
    (even Alton Brown, altho he just passes on what the others have said)
    and I want someone who has read them too and can explain in greater
    depth than a book can.

    so anyway, thanks for the help!

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 20:55:00 -0600, Pringles CheezUms
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This is to people who live in or around Wichita, KS:
    >
    > Are there any cooking schools or classes around town?
    > I'd like to take some.
    > They need to be hands-on tho, I'm not all that interested in the
    > performer...er...teacher standing up there doing something and talking.
    > I want to actually do it myself and really learn how.
    >
    > What would also help is if they knew the science behind it. I want to
    > know why things happen the way they do. I've read McGee, Woulk, Corriher
    > (even Alton Brown, altho he just passes on what the others have said)
    > and I want someone who has read them too and can explain in greater
    > depth than a book can.
    >
    > so anyway, thanks for the help!


    Sounds like you want something more in depth than classes aimed at the
    average consumer, so everyday cooking classes are not what you're
    looking for. You need something aimed at professionals or wanna be
    professionals. Is there a commercial cooking school or culinary
    institute in the area? Have you checked out the Hotel and Restaurant
    Management classes at your local Jr. College? Cooking is part of the
    curriculum, so the instructor should have those answers for you.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  3. #3
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    sf wrote:

    >> This is to people who live in or around Wichita, KS:
    >>
    >> Are there any cooking schools or classes around town?
    >> I'd like to take some.
    >> They need to be hands-on tho, I'm not all that interested in the
    >> performer...er...teacher standing up there doing something and talking.
    >> I want to actually do it myself and really learn how.
    >>
    >> What would also help is if they knew the science behind it. I want to
    >> know why things happen the way they do. I've read McGee, Woulk, Corriher
    >> (even Alton Brown, altho he just passes on what the others have said)
    >> and I want someone who has read them too and can explain in greater
    >> depth than a book can.
    >>
    >> so anyway, thanks for the help!

    >
    > Sounds like you want something more in depth than classes aimed at the
    > average consumer, so everyday cooking classes are not what you're
    > looking for. You need something aimed at professionals or wanna be
    > professionals. Is there a commercial cooking school or culinary
    > institute in the area? Have you checked out the Hotel and Restaurant
    > Management classes at your local Jr. College? Cooking is part of the
    > curriculum, so the instructor should have those answers for you.


    I thought it sounded like a cross between a home ec class (which would
    provide the hands-on part) and what would have to be a series (from 9 to 18
    college credits) of food science classes. And for the molecular-gastronomy
    stuff you'd probably have to attend either a cooking school or serve a
    professional apprenticeship. Restaurant management classes are more likely
    to concentrate on how to pass inspections, i.e., most of the time would be
    devoted to safe food storage and preparation, and on the standards for
    cleanliness.

    Cooking schools, especially the ones which discuss the scientific aspects of
    baking, pickling, and similar processes are pretty expensive; I'd put that
    forth as a last resort.

    Bob



  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 20:52:31 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > I thought it sounded like a cross between a home ec class (which would
    > provide the hands-on part) and what would have to be a series (from 9 to 18
    > college credits) of food science classes. And for the molecular-gastronomy
    > stuff you'd probably have to attend either a cooking school or serve a
    > professional apprenticeship.


    I've never heard of "food sciences". I suggested what I know about.

    > Restaurant management classes are more likely
    > to concentrate on how to pass inspections, i.e., most of the time would be
    > devoted to safe food storage and preparation, and on the standards for
    > cleanliness.


    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  5. #5
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    sf wrote:

    >> I thought it sounded like a cross between a home ec class (which would
    >> provide the hands-on part) and what would have to be a series (from 9 to
    >> 18 college credits) of food science classes. And for the
    >> molecular-gastronomy stuff you'd probably have to attend either a cooking
    >> school or serve a professional apprenticeship.

    >
    > I've never heard of "food sciences". I suggested what I know about.


    No problem. UC Davis has a Food Science program which is fairly
    well-regarded. Their web site(http://foodscience.ucdavis.edu/) has this
    description:

    "The internationally recognized Food Science and Technology Department makes
    food healthier, tastier, and safer for consumers. Students complete a
    rigorous scientific curriculum that prepares them well for the numerous job
    opportunities available in the food industry or for graduate studies in the
    physical, chemical, and biological sciences and medicine."

    Looking over the material presented and considering Davis's proximity to
    Napa and Chico, it comes as no great surprise that much space is devoted to
    brewing and winemaking. The overview of the undergraduate program shows that
    it is indeed a scientific discipline:

    =================================BEGIN QUOTE================================

    Students majoring in Food Science spend the first two years of study
    developing the scientific and general background necessary for upper
    division courses. The science courses include chemistry, biology, physics,
    and mathematics. General background is provided by course offerings in the
    social science/humanities area and by optional courses in Introductory Food
    Science. At the upper division level, students take courses in nutrition,
    food microbiology, food chemistry, food analysis, food commodities, food
    processing, and food engineering.

    A Food Science graduate is also prepared for post-graduate studies leading
    to careers in research. Research in Food Science is directed towards
    improving nutritional value, towards understanding the interaction of food
    components essential to nutritional, safety, and physical properties,
    towards improving packaging with attention to environmental concerns, and
    towards improving our methods of problem detection. It is also directed
    toward maximizing the utilization of agricultural resources.

    ==================================END QUOTE=================================

    So now you know!

    Bob




  6. #6
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 20:55:00 -0600, Pringles CheezUms wrote:

    > This is to people who live in or around Wichita, KS:
    >
    > Are there any cooking schools or classes around town?
    > I'd like to take some.
    > They need to be hands-on tho, I'm not all that interested in the
    > performer...er...teacher standing up there doing something and talking.
    > I want to actually do it myself and really learn how.
    >
    > What would also help is if they knew the science behind it. I want to
    > know why things happen the way they do. I've read McGee, Woulk, Corriher
    > (even Alton Brown, altho he just passes on what the others have said)
    > and I want someone who has read them too and can explain in greater
    > depth than a book can.
    >
    > so anyway, thanks for the help!


    not so much for the science end of things, but for a hands-on class you
    might check the food section of your local newspaper. the washington
    *post*'s, at any rate has notices/ads for these from time to time. it
    might be a little late for the fall season, though. check the paper's web
    site if there is one.

    your pal,
    blake

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 01:08:51 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > No problem. UC Davis has a Food Science program which is fairly
    > well-regarded. Their web site(http://foodscience.ucdavis.edu/) has this
    > description:
    >


    A Food Science program is certainly another viable option for the OP
    to look for in or around Wichita, KS - especially since he wants to
    learn the science of cooking.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  8. #8
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    Pringles CheezUms wrote:
    >
    > This is to people who live in or around Wichita, KS:
    >
    > Are there any cooking schools or classes around town?
    > I'd like to take some.


    Ask at your local public library, and at your nearest US Navy
    recruiting center.

  9. #9
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    In article <jjjud65d[email protected]>,
    Pringles CheezUms <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This is to people who live in or around Wichita, KS:
    >
    > Are there any cooking schools or classes around town?
    > I'd like to take some.
    > They need to be hands-on tho, I'm not all that interested in the
    > performer...er...teacher standing up there doing something and talking.
    > I want to actually do it myself and really learn how.
    >
    > What would also help is if they knew the science behind it. I want to
    > know why things happen the way they do. I've read McGee, Woulk, Corriher
    > (even Alton Brown, altho he just passes on what the others have said)
    > and I want someone who has read them too and can explain in greater
    > depth than a book can.
    >
    > so anyway, thanks for the help!


    Have you tried the Yellow Pages for Cooking Schools?
    Have you tried the local school district's community education offerings?
    Have you tried the local community college's offerings?
    Have you tried the local vo-tech school's catalog?
    Have you considered hiring an instructor?
    Have you asked at any restaurants if they conduct any cooking classes?

    Those are the things that popped into my mind.
    Good luck in the hunt!

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Apple pie posted 10-31-2010; http://web.me.com/barbschaller

  10. #10
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    In article <1qopa2tg3bcw.xrg54pbxswvy$.[email protected]>,
    blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 20:55:00 -0600, Pringles CheezUms wrote:
    >
    > > This is to people who live in or around Wichita, KS:
    > >
    > > Are there any cooking schools or classes around town?
    > > I'd like to take some.
    > > They need to be hands-on tho, I'm not all that interested in the
    > > performer...er...teacher standing up there doing something and talking.
    > > I want to actually do it myself and really learn how.
    > >
    > > What would also help is if they knew the science behind it. I want to
    > > know why things happen the way they do. I've read McGee, Woulk, Corriher
    > > (even Alton Brown, altho he just passes on what the others have said)
    > > and I want someone who has read them too and can explain in greater
    > > depth than a book can.
    > >
    > > so anyway, thanks for the help!

    >
    > not so much for the science end of things, but for a hands-on class you
    > might check the food section of your local newspaper. the washington
    > *post*'s, at any rate has notices/ads for these from time to time. it
    > might be a little late for the fall season, though. check the paper's web
    > site if there is one.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    Great idea, Blake. And I forgot to include in my list to ask at a local
    kitchen supply store if they offer any classes.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Apple pie posted 10-31-2010; http://web.me.com/barbschaller

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 17:37:14 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Have you tried the Yellow Pages for Cooking Schools?
    >Have you tried the local school district's community education offerings?
    >Have you tried the local community college's offerings?
    >Have you tried the local vo-tech school's catalog?
    >Have you considered hiring an instructor?
    >Have you asked at any restaurants if they conduct any cooking classes?
    >
    >Those are the things that popped into my mind.
    >Good luck in the hunt!


    Obvious answer: No.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 17:38:24 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Great idea, Blake. And I forgot to include in my list to ask at a local
    >kitchen supply store if they offer any classes.


    I sincerely doubt they would have the science aspect, so maybe that's
    what the OP needs because it seems like he wants to feel superior by
    asking gotcha questions.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  13. #13
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    >
    > Have you tried the Yellow Pages for Cooking Schools?
    > Have you tried the local school district's community education offerings?
    > Have you tried the local community college's offerings?
    > Have you tried the local vo-tech school's catalog?
    > Have you considered hiring an instructor?
    > Have you asked at any restaurants if they conduct any cooking classes?
    >
    > Those are the things that popped into my mind.



    I know that there's a Johnson & Wales college in Denver that offers
    majors in commercial cooking and resort management, etc. and also a
    vocational high school that has a good rep for preparing restaurant
    cooks. A few years ago our son-in-law gave his wife (a very good cook)
    a certificate as a Christmas gift for some gourmet cooking classes at a
    private cooking school downtown. He found it online and she loved it.

    gloria p

  14. #14
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    sf wrote:
    > On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 17:38:24 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Great idea, Blake. And I forgot to include in my list to ask at a local
    >> kitchen supply store if they offer any classes.

    >
    > I sincerely doubt they would have the science aspect, so maybe that's
    > what the OP needs because it seems like he wants to feel superior by
    > asking gotcha questions.
    >



    It sounded that way to me, too. I think it was Barb who used to say
    "Are we going to measure or cook?" In this case it's more like
    "Do we want to learn cooking or chemistry?"

    gloria p

  15. #15
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 17:38:24 -0600, Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > In article <1qopa2tg3bcw.xrg54pbxswvy$.[email protected]>,
    > blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 20:55:00 -0600, Pringles CheezUms wrote:
    >>
    >>> This is to people who live in or around Wichita, KS:
    >>>
    >>> Are there any cooking schools or classes around town?
    >>> I'd like to take some.
    >>> They need to be hands-on tho, I'm not all that interested in the
    >>> performer...er...teacher standing up there doing something and talking.
    >>> I want to actually do it myself and really learn how.
    >>>
    >>> What would also help is if they knew the science behind it. I want to
    >>> know why things happen the way they do. I've read McGee, Woulk, Corriher
    >>> (even Alton Brown, altho he just passes on what the others have said)
    >>> and I want someone who has read them too and can explain in greater
    >>> depth than a book can.
    >>>
    >>> so anyway, thanks for the help!

    >>
    >> not so much for the science end of things, but for a hands-on class you
    >> might check the food section of your local newspaper. the washington
    >> *post*'s, at any rate has notices/ads for these from time to time. it
    >> might be a little late for the fall season, though. check the paper's web
    >> site if there is one.
    >>
    >> your pal,
    >> blake

    >
    > Great idea, Blake. And I forgot to include in my list to ask at a local
    > kitchen supply store if they offer any classes.


    ....and i forgot that one.

    your pal,
    blake

  16. #16
    Pringles CheezUms Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:36:32 -0700, "gloria.p" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >sf wrote:
    >> On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 17:38:24 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Great idea, Blake. And I forgot to include in my list to ask at a local
    >>> kitchen supply store if they offer any classes.

    >>
    >> I sincerely doubt they would have the science aspect, so maybe that's
    >> what the OP needs because it seems like he wants to feel superior by
    >> asking gotcha questions.

    >
    >It sounded that way to me, too. I think it was Barb who used to say
    >"Are we going to measure or cook?" In this case it's more like
    >"Do we want to learn cooking or chemistry?"


    I didn't want it to sound that way. I have, unfortunately, done that
    before but it's not productive. I mentioned the names I had read because
    I thot most people around here would be familiar with their work. It's
    like saying e.g. Jackson's Tolkien movies to differentiate from
    Bakshi's. It wasn't to sound superior it was to inform you of what I was
    looking for.
    I want to know why things happen, so I ask why questions. Not all
    teachers like that so I need to find a teacher who knows why or is
    willing to say 'I don't know'. That's ok too.

    I have asked at kitchen supply stores. Most of them don't know about any
    classes. The lady I talked to at William Sonoma seemed more
    knowledgeable than any, but they only have demonstration classes not
    hands-on.

    And whoever mentioned the Navy, that option was closed long ago! The
    only way they'd consider letting in a fat middle-aged guy with asthma is
    if there's another world war (and then it'd be Air Force but I
    digress...)

  17. #17
    Pringles CheezUms Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Pringles CheezUms <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Are there any cooking schools or classes around town?
    >> ...
    >> so anyway, thanks for the help!

    >
    >Have you tried the Yellow Pages for Cooking Schools?
    >Have you tried the local school district's community education offerings?
    >Have you tried the local community college's offerings?
    >Have you tried the local vo-tech school's catalog?
    >Have you considered hiring an instructor?
    >Have you asked at any restaurants if they conduct any cooking classes?
    >
    >Those are the things that popped into my mind.
    >Good luck in the hunt!


    Yellow pages - yes
    Colleges/Vo-Tech - yes. Several come up in search engines as having food
    or cooking-related courses, but none list cooking classes or food
    science in their curriculum. Kansas State has one of the better food
    science schools, but that's way more money and commitment than I'm
    interested in. I just want to learn to cook and know why you do what you
    do, not change careers.
    Hiring an instructor - even more money so that's out.
    Restaurants - good suggestion. Worth checking out.

    Thanks to all who gave useful advice!

  18. #18
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    In article <ibrr36$oqe$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > sf wrote:
    > > On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 17:38:24 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Great idea, Blake. And I forgot to include in my list to ask at a local
    > >> kitchen supply store if they offer any classes.

    > >
    > > I sincerely doubt they would have the science aspect, so maybe that's
    > > what the OP needs because it seems like he wants to feel superior by
    > > asking gotcha questions.
    > >

    >
    >
    > It sounded that way to me, too. I think it was Barb who used to say
    > "Are we going to measure or cook?" In this case it's more like
    > "Do we want to learn cooking or chemistry?"


    Yep. While knowing the science is fascinating and often helpful, "food
    science" is really aimed and making food as an industrial process, not
    at cooking single meals.

  19. #19
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking Schools or Classes in Kansas?

    "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <ibrr36$oqe$[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >>
    >> sf wrote:
    >> > On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 17:38:24 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    >> > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Great idea, Blake. And I forgot to include in my list to ask at a
    >> >> local kitchen supply store if they offer any classes.
    >> >
    >> > I sincerely doubt they would have the science aspect, so maybe
    >> > that's what the OP needs because it seems like he wants to feel
    >> > superior by asking gotcha questions.
    >> >

    >>
    >>
    >> It sounded that way to me, too. I think it was Barb who used to say
    >> "Are we going to measure or cook?" In this case it's more like
    >> "Do we want to learn cooking or chemistry?"

    >
    > Yep. While knowing the science is fascinating and often helpful,
    > "food science" is really aimed and making food as an industrial
    > process, not at cooking single meals.



    Dial up Arthur Bryant for a job!!!

    http://www.arthurbryantsbbq.com/

    I'd probably weigh 1,000,001 pounds if I did that by now!

    Andy

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