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Thread: Cooking A Salmon

  1. #1
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So the hubster and I went to Costco and lo and behold they were selling
    >whole salmon for a real good price...


    >I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top rack of
    >a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to proceed? Or is this
    >simply another "old fish story"?


    Even among fishes, salmon odor is difficult to get rid of. I would
    not want to have a salmon-smelling dishwasher!

    Plus, there is no need. You can just roast the salmon in the oven.
    It is a high-fat fish, so it typically requires no adornment whatsoever,
    although I sometimes rub it with a bit of olive oil. Set in a pan
    or tray deep enough to catch the grease, and you're all set.

    Steve

  2. #2
    cybercat Guest

    Default Cooking A Salmon

    So the hubster and I went to Costco and lo and behold they were selling
    whole salmon for a real good price...

    I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top rack of
    a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to proceed? Or is this
    simply another "old fish story"?

    TIA



  3. #3
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    On Nov 28, 2:08*pm, "cybercat" <cyberpu...@yohoo.com> wrote:
    > So the hubster and I went to Costco and lo and behold they were selling
    > whole salmon for a real good price...
    >
    > I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top rack of
    > a dishwasher. *Is this really true? *And if so, how to proceed? *Oris this
    > simply another "old fish story"?
    >
    > TIA


    Why would you even want to do that? Roast it, fry it or even grill it.

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 22:03:57 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

    > cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>So the hubster and I went to Costco and lo and behold they were selling
    >>whole salmon for a real good price...

    >
    >>I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top rack of
    >>a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to proceed? Or is this
    >>simply another "old fish story"?

    >
    > Even among fishes, salmon odor is difficult to get rid of. I would
    > not want to have a salmon-smelling dishwasher!


    Especially when you have a real oven and/or stove top and/or grill.

    Anybody else find it suspicious that Gregory and Cybercat are the
    only ones using Earthlink.net as their ISP? You get to smash two
    toads with one cinder-block by killfiling the whole earthlink.com
    domain.

    -sw

  5. #5
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    cybercat wrote:
    > So the hubster and I went to Costco and lo and behold they were selling
    > whole salmon for a real good price...
    >
    > I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top rack of
    > a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to proceed? Or is this
    > simply another "old fish story"?
    >
    > TIA


    Never tried it, but here is a link.
    http://www.wildlifenews.alaska.gov/i...rticles_id=230


    Many years ago, people were cooking on the engines in cars, while the
    car was being driven. Does anybody remember that?


    Becca

  6. #6
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    cybercat wrote:
    >
    > I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top rack of
    > a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to proceed? Or is this
    > simply another "old fish story"?


    No, no, you've got it backwards. You can
    clean dishes in an oven, as long as it has
    a self-cleaning cycle. Just put the dirty
    dishes in there and run the cycle. Hope
    this helps. :-)

  7. #7
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > You get to smash two
    > toads with one cinder-block


    Interesting turn of phrase.

  8. #8
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon



    cybercat wrote:
    > So the hubster and I went to Costco and lo and behold they were selling
    > whole salmon for a real good price...
    >
    > I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top rack of
    > a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to proceed? Or is this
    > simply another "old fish story"?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >


    Even if, in the dishwasher, you would want to prep the fish for cooking,
    wouldn't you?

    If your going to go to the trouble of butchering the whole fish why not
    just use a roasting pan and cover to steam or roast? Or even braise for
    that matter, there are fish stews that start with a braise of red wine,
    and then continue to 'boil down' (in French, Marseilles dialect till
    all the other ingredients are done and simmering in a rich fish sauce.

    Escoffier argues that only cuts of fish, fillets (not to thin!) be
    placed in boiling water (and then immediately turned down to simmer) and
    that whole fish should be cooked, from the start, gently, start them in
    cold water or court bouillon and bring slowly to a simmer.

    The dish washer will immediately immerse your whole fish in very hot
    water. Which can result in sudden shrinkage, breakage and distortion of
    the fish. As well as having an effect on the way its internal liquids
    are expelled from it by an immediate immersion in boiling water, and go
    down the drain in your dish washer.

    Start the whole fish in cold water or bouillon or other cooking liquid
    and gently bring to a boil, immediately turn down to a simmer and gently
    cook till done.

    Saumon - Salmon

    For 10 persons allow 2 & 1/4 lb. [roughly a 20 pound salmon]

    "Whole salmon and Darnes of salmon are usually cooked in a Vinegar Court
    - bouillon started from cold, covered with a piece of clean cloth,
    brought gently to the boil, then finished cooking without boiling, on
    the side of the stove.

    This general method for cooking whole fish and large cuts of salmon has
    a few exceptions which are given in the Methods of Cooking Fish at the
    beginning of this chapter.

    It is usual to serve salmon cooked in Court - bouillon with two sauces;
    those which are most suitable are Sauces Anchois, Capres, Cretvetter,
    Genevoise, Hollandaise, Homard, aux Huitres, Mousseline, Nantua,
    Noisette, Ravigote and Venitienne' these Sauces are also suitable for
    serving with crimped salmon.

    In England salmon is always served accompanied with plain or salted
    sliced cucumber. When served cold, cucumber is used as an item of
    decoration.

    Note: Correctly speaking, a Darne is a section cut from the middle of
    the fish on the bone, which may vary in size according to the number of
    people it is to be served to."
    --

    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.
    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 16:25:09 -0600, Becca <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Many years ago, people were cooking on the engines in cars, while the
    >car was being driven. Does anybody remember that?


    Yes.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 14:28:44 -0800, Mark Thorson wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >> You get to smash two
    >> toads with one cinder-block

    >
    > Interesting turn of phrase.


    Grade school memories. A friend once smashed a toad between two
    cinder blocks. It squirted right into ... <censored in food group>.

    ObFood: Braised short ribs tonight. I could cook these every other
    night of the week if I had the time. Especially since they're
    $1.79/lb, huge and meaty.

    -sw

  11. #11
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    cybercat wrote on Sat, 28 Nov 2009 16:08:56 -0600:

    > I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in
    > the top rack of a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if
    > so, how to proceed? Or is this simply another "old fish
    > story"?


    If you want to cook a salmon fillet quickly, I like Saumon a
    l'Unilaterale, roasted on salt at 500F.

    2 cups coarse sea salt or kosher salt

    1¼ lb center-cut piece salmon fillet



    Spread salt on a dish made by folding Aluminum foil three times. Cover
    with a layer of coarse (Kosher) salt and place in oven while heating to
    500F.



    Pat salmon dry and season flesh with salt and pepper, then put, skin
    side down, on salt. Cook salmon, covered, without turning, until almost
    cooked through, 8 to 12 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand,
    covered, until salmon is just cooked through, 1 to 2 minutes.



    Slide a spatula between salmon skin and flesh and transfer salmon to a
    platter (salmon skin will be too salty to eat).



    Makes 4 servings.


    You can serve this with as simple as sliced lemon or make various
    sauces.

    Dill Fish Sauce

    Mayo (not sweet like Miracle Whip!)
    Dried minced onion flakes to taste
    Dill to taste or parsley
    Chopped dill pickle to taste



    Mix well and let flavors blend for an hour.



    Fresh Cucumber Herb Sauce for Salmon



    Copyright 2003 by TheDenverChannel.com. All rights reserved. This
    material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



    8 oz creme fraiche

    1/4 cup minced cucumber

    2 TBS sweet onion

    juice and zest of 1/2 lemon

    1-3 TBS fresh tarragon or dill

    1/4 tsp white pepper

    2 pinches salt -- to taste





    Stir ingredients together well, taste and adjust. Serve at room
    temperature with warm salmon and veggies. Yogurt or sour cream can
    replace the creme fraiche if necessary.




    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  12. #12
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >> You get to smash two
    >> toads with one cinder-block

    >
    > Interesting turn of phrase.



    "Sqwertz was presribed the crazy pill

    Which couldn't curb his urge for a thrill

    He stuck dynamite up his mangina

    Parts were found in Carolina

    And the fake titty pieces landed in Brazil..."


    --
    Best
    Greg



  13. #13
    __ Stu __ Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 16:08:56 -0600, "cybercat" <[email protected]> wrote:

    -->So the hubster and I went to Costco and lo and behold they were selling
    -->whole salmon for a real good price...
    -->
    -->I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top rack of
    -->a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to proceed? Or is this
    -->simply another "old fish story"?
    -->
    -->TIA
    -->



    Dishwasher Salmon

    1 tablespoon olive oil
    4 (6-ounce) salmon fillets
    4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
    salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
    heavy-duty aluminum foil

    Prep

    1 Cut two 12-inch square sheets of aluminum foil.
    2 Grease the shiny side of the foil with the oil. Place 2 fillets side by
    side on each square and fold up the outer edges.
    3 Drizzle 1 tablespoon lime juice over each fillet. Season with salt and
    pepper.
    4 Fold and pinch the aluminum foil extra tightly to create a watertight seal
    around each pair of fillets. Make sure the packet is airtight by pressing down
    on it gently with your hand. If air escapes easily, rewrap.
    5 Place foil packets on the top rack of the dishwasher. Run dishwasher for
    the entire "normal" cycle.
    6 When cycle is complete, take out salmon, discard foil, place one fillet on
    each plate, and spoon a generous serving of dill sauce over top.


    This bright, fresh-tasting sauce will add some bite to your catch.


    Piquant Dill Sauce

    1 tablespoon butter
    1 leek, white part only, finely chopped, then thoroughly washed
    1 shallot, minced
    1 jalapeño chili, seeds and membranes removed, finely diced
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    1 cup chicken stock
    1 1/2 cups lightly packed fresh dill, stems removed before measuring
    2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    3 tablespoons sour cream

    Prep

    1 Melt the butter over medium heat in a sauté pan.
    2 Add the leek, shallot, jalapeño, and garlic and sauté for about 5 minutes,
    or until the leeks and shallots are translucent—but not brown.
    3 Reduce heat to medium and add the stock. Simmer, uncovered, for 15 minutes.
    (Adjust heat as required to maintain simmer.) The liquid should reduce by half.
    4 Remove from heat and let cool.
    5 Transfer to a blender or food processor and add the dill, lemon juice,
    salt, and pepper. Puree until smooth. Reserve and reheat just before serving.
    Stir in the sour cream at the last minute.




  14. #14
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    Becca wrote:

    > Many years ago, people were cooking on the engines in cars, while the
    > car was being driven. Does anybody remember that?


    I did that with military vehicles when I was in the reserves. When I had
    a summer job in an alloy smelting plant we used to put foil wrapped food
    on the freshly poured metal ingots.


  15. #15
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    Becca wrote:
    >
    > Many years ago, people were cooking on the engines in cars, while the
    > car was being driven. Does anybody remember that?


    In 1968 my uncle John was doing that with my grandfather's
    van. I think it was a Ford. It had a convenient hatch
    which could be opened to expose the engine. He drove it
    with the hatch on, of course, but he opened the hatch
    to put on and remove the food.

  16. #16
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > cybercat wrote:


    > > I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top rack of
    > > a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to proceed? Or is this
    > > simply another "old fish story"?


    > Even if, in the dishwasher, you would want to prep the fish for cooking,
    > wouldn't you?


    > The dish washer will immediately immerse your whole fish in very hot
    > water. Which can result in sudden shrinkage, breakage and distortion of
    > the fish. As well as having an effect on the way its internal liquids
    > are expelled from it by an immediate immersion in boiling water, and go
    > down the drain in your dish washer.


    The water in a home dishwasher comes from the hot water pipes, so will
    be the same temperature as you set your water heater. Some home
    dishwashers will heat water that isn't hot enough, if you set them so.
    In any case, the water coming in will be nowhere near boiling. Most
    water heaters are set around 140F. Water that is too hot will tend to
    cook *your* skin, when handwashing or bathing. This is particularly
    dangerous for small children who aren't paying attention, and older
    people whose nerves aren't as sensitive as they used to be.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  17. #17
    PeterL Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> cybercat wrote:

    >
    >> > I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top
    >> > rack of a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to
    >> > proceed? Or is this simply another "old fish story"?

    >
    >> Even if, in the dishwasher, you would want to prep the fish for
    >> cooking, wouldn't you?

    >
    >> The dish washer will immediately immerse your whole fish in very hot
    >> water. Which can result in sudden shrinkage, breakage and distortion
    >> of the fish. As well as having an effect on the way its internal
    >> liquids are expelled from it by an immediate immersion in boiling
    >> water, and go down the drain in your dish washer.

    >
    > The water in a home dishwasher comes from the hot water pipes, so will
    > be the same temperature as you set your water heater. Some home
    > dishwashers will heat water that isn't hot enough, if you set them so.
    > In any case, the water coming in will be nowhere near boiling. Most
    > water heaters are set around 140F. Water that is too hot will tend to
    > cook *your* skin, when handwashing or bathing. This is particularly
    > dangerous for small children who aren't paying attention, and older
    > people whose nerves aren't as sensitive as they used to be.
    >



    http://www.google.com.au/search?
    q=cooking+salmon+in+a+dishwasher&sourceid=navclien t-ff&ie=UTF-8&rlz=
    1B3GGGL_enAU240AU240


    http://tinyurl.com/yhoufra


    It gets done quite a lot....... I've tried it once, but I prefer my salmon
    with a crispy skin :-)

    Food can also be cooked on the manifold of your car while you go for that
    road trip.

    http://www.wikihow.com/Cook-Food-on-Your-Car%27s-Engine



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    If we are not meant to eat animals,
    why are they made of meat?

  18. #18
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon



    Dan Abel wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>cybercat wrote:

    >
    >
    >>>I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top rack of
    >>>a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to proceed? Or is this
    >>>simply another "old fish story"?

    >>

    >
    >>Even if, in the dishwasher, you would want to prep the fish for cooking,
    >>wouldn't you?

    >
    >
    >>The dish washer will immediately immerse your whole fish in very hot
    >>water. Which can result in sudden shrinkage, breakage and distortion of
    >>the fish. As well as having an effect on the way its internal liquids
    >>are expelled from it by an immediate immersion in boiling water, and go
    >>down the drain in your dish washer.

    >
    >
    > The water in a home dishwasher comes from the hot water pipes, so will
    > be the same temperature as you set your water heater. Some home
    > dishwashers will heat water that isn't hot enough, if you set them so.
    > In any case, the water coming in will be nowhere near boiling. Most
    > water heaters are set around 140F. Water that is too hot will tend to
    > cook *your* skin, when handwashing or bathing. This is particularly
    > dangerous for small children who aren't paying attention, and older
    > people whose nerves aren't as sensitive as they used to be.
    >


    I wasn't sure of the precise temperature at which animal flesh begins to
    cook, just about anything about 110 F?

    Some smaller fish cooked "en bleu" will deform in a way considered
    desirable to the serving of them. But that is really more about
    appearances and presentation than anything else.
    --
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.
    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  19. #19
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > Becca wrote:
    >> Many years ago, people were cooking on the engines in cars, while the
    >> car was being driven. Does anybody remember that?

    >
    > In 1968 my uncle John was doing that with my grandfather's
    > van. I think it was a Ford. It had a convenient hatch
    > which could be opened to expose the engine. He drove it
    > with the hatch on, of course, but he opened the hatch
    > to put on and remove the food.


    I think there is a rather famous book on cooking this way. The
    name is currently eluding me.

    --
    Jean B.

  20. #20
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Cooking A Salmon

    PeterL wrote:
    > Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> "Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> cybercat wrote:
    >>>> I've read that it's actually possible to "cook" a salmon in the top
    >>>> rack of a dishwasher. Is this really true? And if so, how to
    >>>> proceed? Or is this simply another "old fish story"?
    >>> Even if, in the dishwasher, you would want to prep the fish for
    >>> cooking, wouldn't you?
    >>> The dish washer will immediately immerse your whole fish in very hot
    >>> water. Which can result in sudden shrinkage, breakage and distortion
    >>> of the fish. As well as having an effect on the way its internal
    >>> liquids are expelled from it by an immediate immersion in boiling
    >>> water, and go down the drain in your dish washer.

    >> The water in a home dishwasher comes from the hot water pipes, so will
    >> be the same temperature as you set your water heater. Some home
    >> dishwashers will heat water that isn't hot enough, if you set them so.
    >> In any case, the water coming in will be nowhere near boiling. Most
    >> water heaters are set around 140F. Water that is too hot will tend to
    >> cook *your* skin, when handwashing or bathing. This is particularly
    >> dangerous for small children who aren't paying attention, and older
    >> people whose nerves aren't as sensitive as they used to be.
    >>

    >
    >
    > http://www.google.com.au/search?
    > q=cooking+salmon+in+a+dishwasher&sourceid=navclien t-ff&ie=UTF-8&rlz=
    > 1B3GGGL_enAU240AU240
    >
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/yhoufra
    >
    >
    > It gets done quite a lot....... I've tried it once, but I prefer my salmon
    > with a crispy skin :-)
    >
    > Food can also be cooked on the manifold of your car while you go for that
    > road trip.
    >
    > http://www.wikihow.com/Cook-Food-on-Your-Car%27s-Engine
    >

    You triggered a memory: the book is Manifold Destiny!

    --
    Jean B.

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