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Thread: Cooking ox tongue?

  1. #1
    Phred Guest

    Default Cooking ox tongue?

    G'day mates,

    Our local second-tier supermarket has had some pickled (i.e. corned)
    ox tongues in stock lately.

    I've never tried cooking the things, but decided to buy one anyway (at
    $3.49/kg they're somewhat cheaper than most cuts :-).

    My "plan" was to cook it like I do corned beef (brisket or
    silverside), but then started to wonder if there are better ways.

    Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    please?

    TIA.

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID


  2. #2
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?

    Phred <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    > please?


    I make it fairly often. Here is a recipe from the rfc cook.book, page
    86. BTW, the resulting broth is very good and can be eaten "as is" or
    used for a soup. Tongue can also be cooked in a pressure cooker. Once
    the cooker has been brought up to pressure, beef tongue requires 45
    minutes to an hour; veal, lamb, or pork tongue requires no more than
    about 30 minutes. As long as the tongue is unskinned, always let the
    pressure fall naturally.

    Boiled beef or veal tongue

    1 beef or veal tongue
    1 carrot
    1 celery root (celeriac)
    several sprigs parsley
    1 onion, chopped
    1 bay leaf
    some black peppercorns
    Salt

    Rinse tongue in cold water, trim of any remaining throat parts, put in a
    saucepan and cover with water. Add some chopped root vegetables, such
    as carrot, celery root, etc., and also parsley, onion, bay leaf, some
    black peppercorns and salt. Bring to the boil, skim, reduce the heat
    and simmer for 3-4 hours, if it's a large beef tongue; for 2 hours, if
    it's a veal tongue. When ready, take out of the pan, plunge in cold
    water until cool enough to handle and remove the skin. Then put back
    into the pan and heat through again. Cut in wide, thick slices and
    serve with mashed potatoes. You might want to serve it with some sauce,
    such as tomato or white sauce made with bouillon, or serve some
    horseradish sauce on the side. I would prefer it as is, though. Very
    easy and very good.

    Victor


  3. #3
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?

    Phred <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    > please?


    I make it fairly often. Here is a recipe from the rfc cook.book, page
    86. BTW, the resulting broth is very good and can be eaten "as is" or
    used for a soup. Tongue can also be cooked in a pressure cooker. Once
    the cooker has been brought up to pressure, beef tongue requires 45
    minutes to an hour; veal, lamb, or pork tongue requires no more than
    about 30 minutes. As long as the tongue is unskinned, always let the
    pressure fall naturally.

    Boiled beef or veal tongue

    1 beef or veal tongue
    1 carrot
    1 celery root (celeriac)
    several sprigs parsley
    1 onion, chopped
    1 bay leaf
    some black peppercorns
    Salt

    Rinse tongue in cold water, trim of any remaining throat parts, put in a
    saucepan and cover with water. Add some chopped root vegetables, such
    as carrot, celery root, etc., and also parsley, onion, bay leaf, some
    black peppercorns and salt. Bring to the boil, skim, reduce the heat
    and simmer for 3-4 hours, if it's a large beef tongue; for 2 hours, if
    it's a veal tongue. When ready, take out of the pan, plunge in cold
    water until cool enough to handle and remove the skin. Then put back
    into the pan and heat through again. Cut in wide, thick slices and
    serve with mashed potatoes. You might want to serve it with some sauce,
    such as tomato or white sauce made with bouillon, or serve some
    horseradish sauce on the side. I would prefer it as is, though. Very
    easy and very good.

    Victor


  4. #4
    margaret suran Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?

    Victor Sack wrote:
    > Phred <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    >> please?

    >
    > I make it fairly often. Here is a recipe from the rfc cook.book, page
    > 86. BTW, the resulting broth is very good and can be eaten "as is" or
    > used for a soup. Tongue can also be cooked in a pressure cooker. Once
    > the cooker has been brought up to pressure, beef tongue requires 45
    > minutes to an hour; veal, lamb, or pork tongue requires no more than
    > about 30 minutes. As long as the tongue is unskinned, always let the
    > pressure fall naturally.
    >
    > Boiled beef or veal tongue
    >
    > 1 beef or veal tongue
    > 1 carrot
    > 1 celery root (celeriac)
    > several sprigs parsley
    > 1 onion, chopped
    > 1 bay leaf
    > some black peppercorns
    > Salt
    >
    > Rinse tongue in cold water, trim of any remaining throat parts, put in a
    > saucepan and cover with water. Add some chopped root vegetables, such
    > as carrot, celery root, etc., and also parsley, onion, bay leaf, some
    > black peppercorns and salt. Bring to the boil, skim, reduce the heat
    > and simmer for 3-4 hours, if it's a large beef tongue; for 2 hours, if
    > it's a veal tongue. When ready, take out of the pan, plunge in cold
    > water until cool enough to handle and remove the skin. Then put back
    > into the pan and heat through again. Cut in wide, thick slices and
    > serve with mashed potatoes. You might want to serve it with some sauce,
    > such as tomato or white sauce made with bouillon, or serve some
    > horseradish sauce on the side. I would prefer it as is, though. Very
    > easy and very good.
    >
    > Victor



    I know, I know, you don't do it, but how can one serve Beef or Veal
    Tongue without cooked Sauerkraut? There are all sorts of laws covering
    this topic. Mashed Potatoes, too, of course, or pain boiled potatoes,
    mushied up with the Sauerkraut.

    Have you ever eaten sweet and sour Beef Tongue, with raisins in the
    sauce? Yuck!!!

  5. #5
    margaret suran Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?

    Victor Sack wrote:
    > Phred <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    >> please?

    >
    > I make it fairly often. Here is a recipe from the rfc cook.book, page
    > 86. BTW, the resulting broth is very good and can be eaten "as is" or
    > used for a soup. Tongue can also be cooked in a pressure cooker. Once
    > the cooker has been brought up to pressure, beef tongue requires 45
    > minutes to an hour; veal, lamb, or pork tongue requires no more than
    > about 30 minutes. As long as the tongue is unskinned, always let the
    > pressure fall naturally.
    >
    > Boiled beef or veal tongue
    >
    > 1 beef or veal tongue
    > 1 carrot
    > 1 celery root (celeriac)
    > several sprigs parsley
    > 1 onion, chopped
    > 1 bay leaf
    > some black peppercorns
    > Salt
    >
    > Rinse tongue in cold water, trim of any remaining throat parts, put in a
    > saucepan and cover with water. Add some chopped root vegetables, such
    > as carrot, celery root, etc., and also parsley, onion, bay leaf, some
    > black peppercorns and salt. Bring to the boil, skim, reduce the heat
    > and simmer for 3-4 hours, if it's a large beef tongue; for 2 hours, if
    > it's a veal tongue. When ready, take out of the pan, plunge in cold
    > water until cool enough to handle and remove the skin. Then put back
    > into the pan and heat through again. Cut in wide, thick slices and
    > serve with mashed potatoes. You might want to serve it with some sauce,
    > such as tomato or white sauce made with bouillon, or serve some
    > horseradish sauce on the side. I would prefer it as is, though. Very
    > easy and very good.
    >
    > Victor



    I know, I know, you don't do it, but how can one serve Beef or Veal
    Tongue without cooked Sauerkraut? There are all sorts of laws covering
    this topic. Mashed Potatoes, too, of course, or pain boiled potatoes,
    mushied up with the Sauerkraut.

    Have you ever eaten sweet and sour Beef Tongue, with raisins in the
    sauce? Yuck!!!

  6. #6
    AusWendy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?


    "Phred" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > G'day mates,
    >
    > Our local second-tier supermarket has had some pickled (i.e. corned)
    > ox tongues in stock lately.
    >
    > I've never tried cooking the things, but decided to buy one anyway (at
    > $3.49/kg they're somewhat cheaper than most cuts :-).
    >
    > My "plan" was to cook it like I do corned beef (brisket or
    > silverside), but then started to wonder if there are better ways.
    >
    > Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    > please?
    >
    > TIA.


    I cook it like silverside. I give it a good rinse and put it in a pot with
    just water. I bring it to the boil and let it simmer for a couple of hours.
    I usually have to top the water up a couple of times. When it's cooked I
    let it cool enough to peel the outer "skin" off it.

    Most of the time I "press" it but not always. When I press it I just put it
    in a bowl with a lid and then place something heavy on it (couple of cans of
    say baked beans etc) and put it in the fridge over night.

    I love tongue sandwiches lol. They are yummo on fresh white bread with say
    relish

    Aus Wendy



  7. #7
    AusWendy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?


    "Phred" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > G'day mates,
    >
    > Our local second-tier supermarket has had some pickled (i.e. corned)
    > ox tongues in stock lately.
    >
    > I've never tried cooking the things, but decided to buy one anyway (at
    > $3.49/kg they're somewhat cheaper than most cuts :-).
    >
    > My "plan" was to cook it like I do corned beef (brisket or
    > silverside), but then started to wonder if there are better ways.
    >
    > Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    > please?
    >
    > TIA.


    I cook it like silverside. I give it a good rinse and put it in a pot with
    just water. I bring it to the boil and let it simmer for a couple of hours.
    I usually have to top the water up a couple of times. When it's cooked I
    let it cool enough to peel the outer "skin" off it.

    Most of the time I "press" it but not always. When I press it I just put it
    in a bowl with a lid and then place something heavy on it (couple of cans of
    say baked beans etc) and put it in the fridge over night.

    I love tongue sandwiches lol. They are yummo on fresh white bread with say
    relish

    Aus Wendy



  8. #8
    Phred Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue [with Sauerkraut]?

    In article <480f35e2$0$3358$[email protected]>, margaret suran <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Victor Sack wrote:
    >> Phred <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    >>> please?


    Thanks very much for this recipe Victor. It looks simple enough for
    even me to make, though I admit I've never before bought celeriac. :-)

    I doubt if I'll get to the shops tomorrow, and Friday is ANZAC day
    here in Oz (somewhat akin to Good Friday socially and economically) so
    I mightn't manage to get any in time because I was planning to cook
    the stuff on Friday when 3 or 4 hours won't be missed.

    Would simple celery stalks help out do you think? I've got half a
    bunch of that in the fridge.

    >> I make it fairly often. Here is a recipe from the rfc cook.book, page
    >> 86. BTW, the resulting broth is very good and can be eaten "as is" or
    >> used for a soup. Tongue can also be cooked in a pressure cooker. Once
    >> the cooker has been brought up to pressure, beef tongue requires 45
    >> minutes to an hour; veal, lamb, or pork tongue requires no more than
    >> about 30 minutes. As long as the tongue is unskinned, always let the
    >> pressure fall naturally.
    >>
    >> Boiled beef or veal tongue
    >>
    >> 1 beef or veal tongue
    >> 1 carrot
    >> 1 celery root (celeriac)
    >> several sprigs parsley
    >> 1 onion, chopped
    >> 1 bay leaf
    >> some black peppercorns
    >> Salt
    >>
    >> Rinse tongue in cold water, trim of any remaining throat parts, put in a
    >> saucepan and cover with water. Add some chopped root vegetables, such
    >> as carrot, celery root, etc., and also parsley, onion, bay leaf, some
    >> black peppercorns and salt. Bring to the boil, skim, reduce the heat
    >> and simmer for 3-4 hours, if it's a large beef tongue; for 2 hours, if
    >> it's a veal tongue. When ready, take out of the pan, plunge in cold
    >> water until cool enough to handle and remove the skin. Then put back
    >> into the pan and heat through again. Cut in wide, thick slices and
    >> serve with mashed potatoes. You might want to serve it with some sauce,
    >> such as tomato or white sauce made with bouillon, or serve some
    >> horseradish sauce on the side. I would prefer it as is, though. Very
    >> easy and very good.

    >
    >I know, I know, you don't do it, but how can one serve Beef or Veal
    >Tongue without cooked Sauerkraut? There are all sorts of laws covering
    > this topic. Mashed Potatoes, too, of course, or pain boiled potatoes,
    >mushied up with the Sauerkraut.


    Margaret, do you make your own Sauerkrautt? Can't say I've ever seen
    it in the shops here in the sticks in Oz, but maybe I don't know what
    I'm looking for. For that matter, is it possible to buy tinned,
    canned, whatever, Sauerkraut and, if so, is it likely to be any good?

    >Have you ever eaten sweet and sour Beef Tongue, with raisins in the
    >sauce? Yuck!!!


    Can't say I have and maybe I'll give it a miss. :-)

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID


  9. #9
    Phred Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue [with Sauerkraut]?

    In article <480f35e2$0$3358$[email protected]>, margaret suran <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Victor Sack wrote:
    >> Phred <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    >>> please?


    Thanks very much for this recipe Victor. It looks simple enough for
    even me to make, though I admit I've never before bought celeriac. :-)

    I doubt if I'll get to the shops tomorrow, and Friday is ANZAC day
    here in Oz (somewhat akin to Good Friday socially and economically) so
    I mightn't manage to get any in time because I was planning to cook
    the stuff on Friday when 3 or 4 hours won't be missed.

    Would simple celery stalks help out do you think? I've got half a
    bunch of that in the fridge.

    >> I make it fairly often. Here is a recipe from the rfc cook.book, page
    >> 86. BTW, the resulting broth is very good and can be eaten "as is" or
    >> used for a soup. Tongue can also be cooked in a pressure cooker. Once
    >> the cooker has been brought up to pressure, beef tongue requires 45
    >> minutes to an hour; veal, lamb, or pork tongue requires no more than
    >> about 30 minutes. As long as the tongue is unskinned, always let the
    >> pressure fall naturally.
    >>
    >> Boiled beef or veal tongue
    >>
    >> 1 beef or veal tongue
    >> 1 carrot
    >> 1 celery root (celeriac)
    >> several sprigs parsley
    >> 1 onion, chopped
    >> 1 bay leaf
    >> some black peppercorns
    >> Salt
    >>
    >> Rinse tongue in cold water, trim of any remaining throat parts, put in a
    >> saucepan and cover with water. Add some chopped root vegetables, such
    >> as carrot, celery root, etc., and also parsley, onion, bay leaf, some
    >> black peppercorns and salt. Bring to the boil, skim, reduce the heat
    >> and simmer for 3-4 hours, if it's a large beef tongue; for 2 hours, if
    >> it's a veal tongue. When ready, take out of the pan, plunge in cold
    >> water until cool enough to handle and remove the skin. Then put back
    >> into the pan and heat through again. Cut in wide, thick slices and
    >> serve with mashed potatoes. You might want to serve it with some sauce,
    >> such as tomato or white sauce made with bouillon, or serve some
    >> horseradish sauce on the side. I would prefer it as is, though. Very
    >> easy and very good.

    >
    >I know, I know, you don't do it, but how can one serve Beef or Veal
    >Tongue without cooked Sauerkraut? There are all sorts of laws covering
    > this topic. Mashed Potatoes, too, of course, or pain boiled potatoes,
    >mushied up with the Sauerkraut.


    Margaret, do you make your own Sauerkrautt? Can't say I've ever seen
    it in the shops here in the sticks in Oz, but maybe I don't know what
    I'm looking for. For that matter, is it possible to buy tinned,
    canned, whatever, Sauerkraut and, if so, is it likely to be any good?

    >Have you ever eaten sweet and sour Beef Tongue, with raisins in the
    >sauce? Yuck!!!


    Can't say I have and maybe I'll give it a miss. :-)

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID


  10. #10
    Phred Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?

    In article <dSGPj.4304$[email protected]>,
    "AusWendy" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Phred" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> Our local second-tier supermarket has had some pickled (i.e. corned)
    >> ox tongues in stock lately.
    >> I've never tried cooking the things, but decided to buy one anyway (at
    >> $3.49/kg they're somewhat cheaper than most cuts :-).

    [...]
    >> Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    >> please?

    >
    >I cook it like silverside. I give it a good rinse and put it in a pot with
    >just water. I bring it to the boil and let it simmer for a couple of hours.
    >I usually have to top the water up a couple of times. When it's cooked I
    >let it cool enough to peel the outer "skin" off it.
    >
    >Most of the time I "press" it but not always. When I press it I just put it
    >in a bowl with a lid and then place something heavy on it (couple of cans of
    >say baked beans etc) and put it in the fridge over night.
    >
    >I love tongue sandwiches lol. They are yummo on fresh white bread with say
    >relish


    Thanks for the reply, Wendy. That's pretty much what I was planning
    to do. (I still have an old "corned beef" press which would have been
    good for pressing tongue too -- it was probably really a tongue press
    anyway, and also good for braun -- but it now leaks and I've been
    trying to get a new one for the past 10 years or so without luck.)

    However, I'm now thinking more along the lines of Victor's recipe
    suggestion. Did you see it? ( It was not crossposted from RFC.) It
    has a few extra bits in it that I haven't previously used with corned
    silverside or brisket.

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID


  11. #11
    Phred Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?

    In article <dSGPj.4304$[email protected]>,
    "AusWendy" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Phred" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> Our local second-tier supermarket has had some pickled (i.e. corned)
    >> ox tongues in stock lately.
    >> I've never tried cooking the things, but decided to buy one anyway (at
    >> $3.49/kg they're somewhat cheaper than most cuts :-).

    [...]
    >> Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    >> please?

    >
    >I cook it like silverside. I give it a good rinse and put it in a pot with
    >just water. I bring it to the boil and let it simmer for a couple of hours.
    >I usually have to top the water up a couple of times. When it's cooked I
    >let it cool enough to peel the outer "skin" off it.
    >
    >Most of the time I "press" it but not always. When I press it I just put it
    >in a bowl with a lid and then place something heavy on it (couple of cans of
    >say baked beans etc) and put it in the fridge over night.
    >
    >I love tongue sandwiches lol. They are yummo on fresh white bread with say
    >relish


    Thanks for the reply, Wendy. That's pretty much what I was planning
    to do. (I still have an old "corned beef" press which would have been
    good for pressing tongue too -- it was probably really a tongue press
    anyway, and also good for braun -- but it now leaks and I've been
    trying to get a new one for the past 10 years or so without luck.)

    However, I'm now thinking more along the lines of Victor's recipe
    suggestion. Did you see it? ( It was not crossposted from RFC.) It
    has a few extra bits in it that I haven't previously used with corned
    silverside or brisket.

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID


  12. #12
    Mike.... Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?

    Following up to Phred

    > Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    > please?


    never had pickled but i can tell you non pickled goes very well with (non
    pickled) beetroot.
    --
    "Mike....."(not "Mike")
    remove clothing to email

  13. #13
    Mike.... Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?

    Following up to Phred

    > Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    > please?


    never had pickled but i can tell you non pickled goes very well with (non
    pickled) beetroot.
    --
    "Mike....."(not "Mike")
    remove clothing to email

  14. #14
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue [with Sauerkraut]?


    I've lost track of who wrote

    > >> Rinse tongue in cold water, trim of any remaining throat parts, put in a
    > >> saucepan and cover with water. Add some chopped root vegetables, such
    > >> as carrot, celery root, etc., and also parsley, onion, bay leaf, some
    > >> black peppercorns and salt. Bring to the boil, skim, reduce the heat
    > >> and simmer for 3-4 hours, if it's a large beef tongue; for 2 hours, if
    > >> it's a veal tongue. When ready, take out of the pan, plunge in cold
    > >> water until cool enough to handle and remove the skin. Then put back
    > >> into the pan and heat through again. Cut in wide, thick slices and
    > >> serve with mashed potatoes.


    and a parsley sauce is good too.

    Or, after you peel the tongue, coil it round into a china basin, put
    a plate on top, and weight it down hard (brick in a plastic bag). If you
    like, pour in a little of the cooking liquor. Leave to go cold. When
    it's cold, turn out (it will have set in the mould shape and the liquor
    will have set to a clear jelly) Carve thinly. Excellent with salad,
    pickles, in sandwiches etc.

    Janet in Scotland

  15. #15
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue [with Sauerkraut]?


    I've lost track of who wrote

    > >> Rinse tongue in cold water, trim of any remaining throat parts, put in a
    > >> saucepan and cover with water. Add some chopped root vegetables, such
    > >> as carrot, celery root, etc., and also parsley, onion, bay leaf, some
    > >> black peppercorns and salt. Bring to the boil, skim, reduce the heat
    > >> and simmer for 3-4 hours, if it's a large beef tongue; for 2 hours, if
    > >> it's a veal tongue. When ready, take out of the pan, plunge in cold
    > >> water until cool enough to handle and remove the skin. Then put back
    > >> into the pan and heat through again. Cut in wide, thick slices and
    > >> serve with mashed potatoes.


    and a parsley sauce is good too.

    Or, after you peel the tongue, coil it round into a china basin, put
    a plate on top, and weight it down hard (brick in a plastic bag). If you
    like, pour in a little of the cooking liquor. Leave to go cold. When
    it's cold, turn out (it will have set in the mould shape and the liquor
    will have set to a clear jelly) Carve thinly. Excellent with salad,
    pickles, in sandwiches etc.

    Janet in Scotland

  16. #16
    John Kane Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue [with Sauerkraut]?

    On Apr 23, 9:53*am, ppnerkDELETET...@yahoo.com (Phred) wrote:
    > In article <480f35e2$0$3358$4c368...@roadrunner.com>, margaret suran <marga...@no.spam.for.me.invalid> wrote:
    >
    > >Victor Sack wrote:
    > >> Phred <ppnerkDELETET...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >>> Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    > >>> please?

    >
    > Thanks very much for this recipe Victor. *It looks simple enough for
    > even me to make, though I admit I've never before bought celeriac. :-)
    >
    > I doubt if I'll get to the shops tomorrow, and Friday is ANZAC day
    > here in Oz (somewhat akin to Good Friday socially and economically) so
    > I mightn't manage to get any in time because I was planning to cook
    > the stuff on Friday when 3 or 4 hours won't be missed.
    >
    > Would simple celery stalks help out do you think? *I've got half a
    > bunch of that in the fridge.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >> I make it fairly often. *Here is a recipe from the rfc cook.book, page
    > >> 86. *BTW, the resulting broth is very good and can be eaten "as is" or
    > >> used for a soup. *Tongue can also be cooked in a pressure cooker. *Once
    > >> the cooker has been brought up to pressure, beef tongue requires 45
    > >> minutes to an hour; veal, lamb, or pork tongue requires no more than
    > >> about 30 minutes. *As long as the tongue is unskinned, always let the
    > >> pressure fall naturally.

    >
    > >> * * * * * * * * * * Boiled beef or veal tongue

    >
    > >> 1 beef or veal tongue
    > >> 1 carrot
    > >> 1 celery root (celeriac)
    > >> several sprigs parsley
    > >> 1 onion, chopped
    > >> 1 bay leaf
    > >> some black peppercorns
    > >> Salt

    >
    > >> Rinse tongue in cold water, trim of any remaining throat parts, put in a
    > >> saucepan and cover with water. *Add some chopped root vegetables, such
    > >> as carrot, celery root, etc., and also parsley, onion, bay leaf, some
    > >> black peppercorns and salt. *Bring to the boil, skim, reduce the heat
    > >> and simmer for 3-4 hours, if it's a large beef tongue; for 2 hours, if
    > >> it's a veal tongue. *When ready, take out of the pan, plunge in cold
    > >> water until cool enough to handle and remove the skin. *Then put back
    > >> into the pan and heat through again. *Cut in wide, thick slices and
    > >> serve with mashed potatoes. *You might want to serve it with some sauce,
    > >> such as tomato or white sauce made with bouillon, or serve some
    > >> horseradish sauce on the side. *I would prefer it as is, though. *Very
    > >> easy and very good.

    >
    > >I know, I know, you don't do it, but how can one serve Beef or Veal
    > >Tongue without cooked Sauerkraut? *There are all sorts of laws covering
    > > *this topic. *Mashed Potatoes, too, of course, or pain boiled potatoes,
    > >mushied up with the Sauerkraut.

    >
    > Margaret, do you make your own Sauerkrautt? *Can't say I've ever seen
    > it in the shops here in the sticks in Oz, but maybe I don't know what
    > I'm looking for. *For that matter, is it possible to buy tinned,
    > canned, whatever, Sauerkraut and, if so, is it likely to be any good?
    >
    > >Have you ever eaten sweet and sour Beef Tongue, with raisins in the
    > >sauce? *Yuck!!!

    >
    > Can't say I have and maybe I'll give it a miss. :-)
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >
    > --
    > ppnerkDEL...@THISyahoo.com.INVALID- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Phred and Victor
    Are you two talking about the same thing? Phred's tongue is pickled
    and Victor's recipe looks like it is for raw/fresh tongue.

    John Kane Kingston ON Canada

  17. #17
    John Kane Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue [with Sauerkraut]?

    On Apr 23, 9:53*am, ppnerkDELETET...@yahoo.com (Phred) wrote:
    > In article <480f35e2$0$3358$4c368...@roadrunner.com>, margaret suran <marga...@no.spam.for.me.invalid> wrote:
    >
    > >Victor Sack wrote:
    > >> Phred <ppnerkDELETET...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >>> Anyone care to share their favourite recipe for cooking ox tongue,
    > >>> please?

    >
    > Thanks very much for this recipe Victor. *It looks simple enough for
    > even me to make, though I admit I've never before bought celeriac. :-)
    >
    > I doubt if I'll get to the shops tomorrow, and Friday is ANZAC day
    > here in Oz (somewhat akin to Good Friday socially and economically) so
    > I mightn't manage to get any in time because I was planning to cook
    > the stuff on Friday when 3 or 4 hours won't be missed.
    >
    > Would simple celery stalks help out do you think? *I've got half a
    > bunch of that in the fridge.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >> I make it fairly often. *Here is a recipe from the rfc cook.book, page
    > >> 86. *BTW, the resulting broth is very good and can be eaten "as is" or
    > >> used for a soup. *Tongue can also be cooked in a pressure cooker. *Once
    > >> the cooker has been brought up to pressure, beef tongue requires 45
    > >> minutes to an hour; veal, lamb, or pork tongue requires no more than
    > >> about 30 minutes. *As long as the tongue is unskinned, always let the
    > >> pressure fall naturally.

    >
    > >> * * * * * * * * * * Boiled beef or veal tongue

    >
    > >> 1 beef or veal tongue
    > >> 1 carrot
    > >> 1 celery root (celeriac)
    > >> several sprigs parsley
    > >> 1 onion, chopped
    > >> 1 bay leaf
    > >> some black peppercorns
    > >> Salt

    >
    > >> Rinse tongue in cold water, trim of any remaining throat parts, put in a
    > >> saucepan and cover with water. *Add some chopped root vegetables, such
    > >> as carrot, celery root, etc., and also parsley, onion, bay leaf, some
    > >> black peppercorns and salt. *Bring to the boil, skim, reduce the heat
    > >> and simmer for 3-4 hours, if it's a large beef tongue; for 2 hours, if
    > >> it's a veal tongue. *When ready, take out of the pan, plunge in cold
    > >> water until cool enough to handle and remove the skin. *Then put back
    > >> into the pan and heat through again. *Cut in wide, thick slices and
    > >> serve with mashed potatoes. *You might want to serve it with some sauce,
    > >> such as tomato or white sauce made with bouillon, or serve some
    > >> horseradish sauce on the side. *I would prefer it as is, though. *Very
    > >> easy and very good.

    >
    > >I know, I know, you don't do it, but how can one serve Beef or Veal
    > >Tongue without cooked Sauerkraut? *There are all sorts of laws covering
    > > *this topic. *Mashed Potatoes, too, of course, or pain boiled potatoes,
    > >mushied up with the Sauerkraut.

    >
    > Margaret, do you make your own Sauerkrautt? *Can't say I've ever seen
    > it in the shops here in the sticks in Oz, but maybe I don't know what
    > I'm looking for. *For that matter, is it possible to buy tinned,
    > canned, whatever, Sauerkraut and, if so, is it likely to be any good?
    >
    > >Have you ever eaten sweet and sour Beef Tongue, with raisins in the
    > >sauce? *Yuck!!!

    >
    > Can't say I have and maybe I'll give it a miss. :-)
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >
    > --
    > ppnerkDEL...@THISyahoo.com.INVALID- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Phred and Victor
    Are you two talking about the same thing? Phred's tongue is pickled
    and Victor's recipe looks like it is for raw/fresh tongue.

    John Kane Kingston ON Canada

  18. #18
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?

    margaret suran <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I know, I know, you don't do it, but how can one serve Beef or Veal
    > Tongue without cooked Sauerkraut? There are all sorts of laws covering
    > this topic. Mashed Potatoes, too, of course, or pain boiled potatoes,
    > mushied up with the Sauerkraut.


    Certainly possible, even though sauerkraut is likely to overwhelm the
    tongue. To me, they just do not go together. BTW, the somewhat lumpy
    mixture of sauerkraut and potatoes is called Sauerkraut "bürgerlich"
    around here (and the same is true with other vegetables mixed with
    potatoes, such as Möhrengemüse (carrots) "bürgerlich", which also would
    go well with the tongue).

    > Have you ever eaten sweet and sour Beef Tongue, with raisins in the
    > sauce? Yuck!!!


    Nope, never, and I hope it stays that way! The "dish" is probably
    derived from the equally inedible tsimmes.

    Bubba

  19. #19
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue?

    margaret suran <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I know, I know, you don't do it, but how can one serve Beef or Veal
    > Tongue without cooked Sauerkraut? There are all sorts of laws covering
    > this topic. Mashed Potatoes, too, of course, or pain boiled potatoes,
    > mushied up with the Sauerkraut.


    Certainly possible, even though sauerkraut is likely to overwhelm the
    tongue. To me, they just do not go together. BTW, the somewhat lumpy
    mixture of sauerkraut and potatoes is called Sauerkraut "bürgerlich"
    around here (and the same is true with other vegetables mixed with
    potatoes, such as Möhrengemüse (carrots) "bürgerlich", which also would
    go well with the tongue).

    > Have you ever eaten sweet and sour Beef Tongue, with raisins in the
    > sauce? Yuck!!!


    Nope, never, and I hope it stays that way! The "dish" is probably
    derived from the equally inedible tsimmes.

    Bubba

  20. #20
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Cooking ox tongue [with Sauerkraut]?

    Phred <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Would simple celery stalks help out do you think? I've got half a
    > bunch of that in the fridge.


    Sure.

    BTW, depending on the value you attach to the broth resulting from
    cooking the tongue, you might choose to start cooking tongue in boiling
    water (or broth for that matter).

    > For that matter, is it possible to buy tinned,
    > canned, whatever, Sauerkraut and, if so, is it likely to be any good?


    It is certainly possible, though whether the brands available in
    Australia are any good is more than I can say.

    Victor

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