Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Cooking more than one item in a microwave

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Cooking more than one item in a microwave

    Is there a rule of thumb or any guidelines for cooking more than one of the same
    pre-packaged frozen item in a microwave? I mean as far as how much time is
    needed? Once in a while, I'll see on a package instructions to cook more than
    one, usually much extra time. But many of the things I microwave, especially
    vegetable side dishes, only have the time and temperature setting for one
    package, which, if I need more than one, I have to cook one, then the other
    which drags out cooking time. Any suggestions? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Cooking more than one item in a microwave

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Is there a rule of thumb or any guidelines for cooking more than one
    > of the same pre-packaged frozen item in a microwave? I mean as far as
    > how much time is needed? Once in a while, I'll see on a package
    > instructions to cook more than one, usually much extra time. But many
    > of the things I microwave, especially vegetable side dishes, only
    > have the time and temperature setting for one package, which, if I
    > need more than one, I have to cook one, then the other which drags
    > out cooking time. Any suggestions? Thanks.


    Add 15 seconds, check the product when the microwave is done, and if still
    too cool, cook some more. That's what I do. :-)
    --
    Dave
    "A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
    butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
    accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
    give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
    problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
    efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."



  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking more than one item in a microwave

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Is there a rule of thumb or any guidelines for cooking more than one
    > of the same pre-packaged frozen item in a microwave? I mean as far as
    > how much time is needed? Once in a while, I'll see on a package
    > instructions to cook more than one, usually much extra time. But many
    > of the things I microwave, especially vegetable side dishes, only have
    > the time and temperature setting for one package, which, if I need
    > more than one, I have to cook one, then the other which drags out
    > cooking time. Any suggestions? Thanks.



    Time + temp is not the complete equation. Missing is the microwave wattage.

    Andy

  4. #4
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Cooking more than one item in a microwave

    On 5/31/2011 2:37 PM, Andy wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> Is there a rule of thumb or any guidelines for cooking more than one
    >> of the same pre-packaged frozen item in a microwave? I mean as far as
    >> how much time is needed? Once in a while, I'll see on a package
    >> instructions to cook more than one, usually much extra time. But many
    >> of the things I microwave, especially vegetable side dishes, only have
    >> the time and temperature setting for one package, which, if I need
    >> more than one, I have to cook one, then the other which drags out
    >> cooking time. Any suggestions? Thanks.

    >
    >
    > Time + temp is not the complete equation. Missing is the microwave wattage.
    >
    > Andy


    At this season, the instruction for sweet corn might be useful.

    FRESH CORN ON THE COB (MICROWAVE)
    Printed from COOKS.COM

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Read more about it at http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,181,...243196,00.html
    Content Copyright 2011 Cooks.com - All rights reserved.

    Cook fresh corn on the cob in microwave with husks and silk intact. They
    will cook in their own natural moisture.
    Place on dampened paper towel. Turn ears over and rearrange after 1/2
    cooking time.


    Cooking Timetable:

    1 ear - 1 1/2 minutes
    2 ears - 3 to 4 minutes
    3 ears - 5 to 6 minutes
    4 ears - 7 to 8 minutes
    6 ears - 8 to 9 minutes.

    When ears are hot to the touch, remove and wrap in kitchen towel or foil.
    Let stand at least 5 minutes. Remove husks and silk (which is easier
    than when cold) and serve.

    Serve with melted butter.

    JVS: It is not necessary to use a dampened paper towel, cover or wait if
    you use a kitchen towel to dehusk the ears.
    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  5. #5
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Cooking more than one item in a microwave

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Is there a rule of thumb or any guidelines for cooking more than one
    > of the same pre-packaged frozen item in a microwave? I mean as far as
    > how much time is needed? Once in a while, I'll see on a package
    > instructions to cook more than one, usually much extra time. But many
    > of the things I microwave, especially vegetable side dishes, only
    > have the time and temperature setting for one package, which, if I
    > need more than one, I have to cook one, then the other which drags
    > out cooking time. Any suggestions? Thanks.


    Our microwave is powerful enough that I've never found package
    directions useful - following them results in overcooked food for us
    every time.

    My approach to the microwave is to _alway_ undercook, test, stir, etc.
    Often a microwaved dish will not seem cooked when you take it out but it
    will seem more cooked if it sits for a little bit.

    If you're looking for a rough guideline, make one up for yourself and
    refine it through trial and error - don't forget you can't figure based
    on how many items you've got in there; you have to take each item's size
    into account as well. For two of the same thing, try adding 25% to the
    cooking time and see how that works.

    Just my two-cents worth, no science claimed here.

    -S-



  6. #6
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking more than one item in a microwave

    On Tue, 31 May 2011 14:25:37 -0400, [email protected] wrote:

    >Is there a rule of thumb or any guidelines for cooking more than one of the same
    >pre-packaged frozen item in a microwave? I mean as far as how much time is
    >needed? Once in a while, I'll see on a package instructions to cook more than
    >one, usually much extra time. But many of the things I microwave, especially
    >vegetable side dishes, only have the time and temperature setting for one
    >package, which, if I need more than one, I have to cook one, then the other
    >which drags out cooking time. Any suggestions? Thanks.


    Microwave cooking is different from conventional cooking in that with
    microwaves cooking time needed is a product of mass... assuming both
    packages of frozen food are very similar (ie. a pound of corn and a
    pound of peas) if you double the quantity then double the time... in
    other words you can bake twenty potatoes in a conventional oven in
    about the same time as baking just one, but with a microwave oven you
    need to cook those twenty potatoes about twenty times longer than
    cooking just one.

  7. #7
    Leon Manfredi Guest

    Default Re: Cooking more than one item in a microwave

    On Tue, 31 May 2011 15:00:01 -0400, James Silverton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 5/31/2011 2:37 PM, Andy wrote:
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is there a rule of thumb or any guidelines for cooking more than one
    >>> of the same pre-packaged frozen item in a microwave? I mean as far as
    >>> how much time is needed? Once in a while, I'll see on a package
    >>> instructions to cook more than one, usually much extra time. But many
    >>> of the things I microwave, especially vegetable side dishes, only have
    >>> the time and temperature setting for one package, which, if I need
    >>> more than one, I have to cook one, then the other which drags out
    >>> cooking time. Any suggestions? Thanks.

    >>
    >>
    >> Time + temp is not the complete equation. Missing is the microwave wattage.
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    >At this season, the instruction for sweet corn might be useful.
    >
    >FRESH CORN ON THE COB (MICROWAVE)
    >Printed from COOKS.COM
    >
    >--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    >
    >Read more about it at http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,181,...243196,00.html
    >Content Copyright 2011 Cooks.com - All rights reserved.
    >
    >Cook fresh corn on the cob in microwave with husks and silk intact. They
    >will cook in their own natural moisture.
    >Place on dampened paper towel. Turn ears over and rearrange after 1/2
    >cooking time.
    >
    >
    >Cooking Timetable:
    >
    >1 ear - 1 1/2 minutes
    >2 ears - 3 to 4 minutes
    >3 ears - 5 to 6 minutes
    >4 ears - 7 to 8 minutes
    >6 ears - 8 to 9 minutes.
    >
    >When ears are hot to the touch, remove and wrap in kitchen towel or foil.
    >Let stand at least 5 minutes. Remove husks and silk (which is easier
    >than when cold) and serve.
    >
    >Serve with melted butter.
    >
    >JVS: It is not necessary to use a dampened paper towel, cover or wait if
    >you use a kitchen towel to dehusk the ears.


    Even better in a loose plastic bag, with the dampened paper toweled
    wrapped corn/s and husk, only....

  8. #8
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Cooking more than one item in a microwave


    "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote
    >
    > Microwave cooking is different from conventional cooking in that with
    > microwaves cooking time needed is a product of mass... assuming both
    > packages of frozen food are very similar (ie. a pound of corn and a
    > pound of peas) if you double the quantity then double the time...



    Pretty much the deal. Only difference is the waiting time after is about
    the same, not doubled. I was always told the waiting time should be at
    least 25% of the cooking time. That allows the internal temperature to even
    out and finish the cooking process.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32