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Thread: Cooking for a friend

  1. #1
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Cooking for a friend

    Lin has a very generous friend who has done big favors for us in the recent
    past. We offered to repay her, but all she wants is for Lin and me to cook a
    dinner for her. She's very well-traveled, but I'd like to make at least some
    things she's probably never had before. Regarding her food likes and
    dislikes, we know that she likes good-quality cheeses and fresh seafoods,
    and she doesn't like most meats. (She was a vegetarian for years.) We
    haven't set a specific date for the dinner, but I'd expect it to be
    somewhere between November 30th and December 20th. Here's my tentative menu:


    APPETIZER
    Soy-cured salmon with asian pear and creme fraiche

    MAIN COURSE
    Scallops with oyster mushrooms, butter, and raspberry vinegar
    Shredded-parsnip pancakes
    Broccolini

    DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    slices

    DESSERT
    Farina crema[1] with orange flower water, white chocolate, and pistachios


    Does the menu need anything like a soup, salad, or more vegetables? Does the
    broccolini need a sauce? What should we drink?

    Bob
    [1]
    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/s...ipe/index.html




  2. #2
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    I am not sure you will have to cook it all for me to taste then i will tell
    hyou what you need to drink, that all sounds wonderful. Lee
    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:4ea9361c$0$21259$c3e8da3$[email protected] eb.com...
    > Lin has a very generous friend who has done big favors for us in the
    > recent past. We offered to repay her, but all she wants is for Lin and me
    > to cook a dinner for her. She's very well-traveled, but I'd like to make
    > at least some things she's probably never had before. Regarding her food
    > likes and dislikes, we know that she likes good-quality cheeses and fresh
    > seafoods, and she doesn't like most meats. (She was a vegetarian for
    > years.) We haven't set a specific date for the dinner, but I'd expect it
    > to be somewhere between November 30th and December 20th. Here's my
    > tentative menu:
    >
    >
    > APPETIZER
    > Soy-cured salmon with asian pear and creme fraiche
    >
    > MAIN COURSE
    > Scallops with oyster mushrooms, butter, and raspberry vinegar
    > Shredded-parsnip pancakes
    > Broccolini
    >
    > DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    > Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    > slices
    >
    > DESSERT
    > Farina crema[1] with orange flower water, white chocolate, and pistachios
    >
    >
    > Does the menu need anything like a soup, salad, or more vegetables? Does
    > the broccolini need a sauce? What should we drink?
    >
    > Bob
    > [1]
    > http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/s...ipe/index.html
    >
    >




  3. #3
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    On Thu, 27 Oct 2011 03:44:37 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >LinShmoo has a very generous friend who has done big favors for us in the recent
    >past. We offered to repay her, but all she wants is for LinShmoo and me to cook a
    >dinner for her. Regarding her food likes and dislikes, we know that she likes
    >good-quality cheeses and fresh seafoods,



    A TIADer... serve breaded halibut Velveeta melts.

  4. #4
    Bull Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    In article <4ea9361c$0$21259$c3e8da3$[email protected] om>,
    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Lin has a very generous friend who has done big favors for us in the recent
    > past. We offered to repay her, but all she wants is for Lin and me to cook a
    > dinner for her. She's very well-traveled, but I'd like to make at least some
    > things she's probably never had before. Regarding her food likes and
    > dislikes, we know that she likes good-quality cheeses and fresh seafoods,
    > and she doesn't like most meats. (She was a vegetarian for years.) We
    > haven't set a specific date for the dinner, but I'd expect it to be
    > somewhere between November 30th and December 20th. Here's my tentative menu:
    >
    >
    > APPETIZER
    > Soy-cured salmon with asian pear and creme fraiche
    >
    > MAIN COURSE
    > Scallops with oyster mushrooms, butter, and raspberry vinegar
    > Shredded-parsnip pancakes
    > Broccolini
    >
    > DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    > Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    > slices
    >
    > DESSERT
    > Farina crema[1] with orange flower water, white chocolate, and pistachios
    >
    >
    > Does the menu need anything like a soup, salad, or more vegetables? Does the
    > broccolini need a sauce? What should we drink?
    >
    > Bob
    > [1]
    > http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/s...ipe/index.html


    Your menu sound great. Looking up umeboshi?

    Pinot Gris from Oregon - something like this:

    http://langewinery.com/mercantool/mt...age_show&produ
    ct=31&category_ID=5

    Bull

  5. #5
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    On Thu, 27 Oct 2011 03:44:37 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >Lin has a very generous friend who has done big favors for us in the recent
    >past. We offered to repay her, but all she wants is for Lin and me to cook a
    >dinner for her. She's very well-traveled, but I'd like to make at least some
    >things she's probably never had before. Regarding her food likes and
    >dislikes, we know that she likes good-quality cheeses and fresh seafoods,
    >and she doesn't like most meats. (She was a vegetarian for years.) We
    >haven't set a specific date for the dinner, but I'd expect it to be
    >somewhere between November 30th and December 20th. Here's my tentative menu:
    >
    >
    >APPETIZER
    >Soy-cured salmon with asian pear and creme fraiche
    >
    >MAIN COURSE
    >Scallops with oyster mushrooms, butter, and raspberry vinegar
    >Shredded-parsnip pancakes
    >Broccolini
    >
    >DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    >Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    >slices
    >
    >DESSERT
    >Farina crema[1] with orange flower water, white chocolate, and pistachios
    >
    >
    >Does the menu need anything like a soup, salad, or more vegetables? Does the
    >broccolini need a sauce? What should we drink?
    >
    >Bob
    >[1]
    >http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/s...ipe/index.html
    >
    >


    It sounds wonderful. It does hum a bit on the sweet side for me. I
    would like something cold, crunchy and definitely savory and maybe
    even tart
    Janet US

  6. #6
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    In article <4ea9361c$0$21259$c3e8da3$[email protected] om>,
    virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz says...
    >
    > Lin has a very generous friend who has done big favors for us in the recent
    > past. We offered to repay her, but all she wants is for Lin and me to cook a
    > dinner for her. She's very well-traveled, but I'd like to make at least some
    > things she's probably never had before. Regarding her food likes and
    > dislikes, we know that she likes good-quality cheeses and fresh seafoods,
    > and she doesn't like most meats. (She was a vegetarian for years.) We
    > haven't set a specific date for the dinner, but I'd expect it to be
    > somewhere between November 30th and December 20th. Here's my tentative menu:
    >
    >
    > APPETIZER
    > Soy-cured salmon with asian pear and creme fraiche
    >
    > MAIN COURSE
    > Scallops with oyster mushrooms, butter, and raspberry vinegar
    > Shredded-parsnip pancakes
    > Broccolini
    >
    > DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    > Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    > slices
    >
    > DESSERT
    > Farina crema[1] with orange flower water, white chocolate, and pistachios
    >
    >
    > Does the menu need anything like a soup, salad, or more vegetables? Does the
    > broccolini need a sauce? What should we drink?
    >
    > Bob
    > [1]
    > http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/s...ipe/index.html


    Sounds good to me apart from the scallops. I love scallops but would
    not mess up their delicate flavour or texture with either mushrooms,
    vinegar or parsnip.

    Janet.

  7. #7
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    In article <4ea9361c$0$21259$c3e8da3$e[email protected] om>,
    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Does the menu need anything like a soup, salad, or more vegetables? Does the
    > broccolini need a sauce? What should we drink?


    I think that's the simplest menu I've ever seen you post. I think it
    looks perfect. It's not all to my taste, but it looks like it would be
    a good meal and a good fit for your friend.

    --
    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    On 10/27/2011 4:44 AM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > Lin has a very generous friend who has done big favors for us in the recent
    > past. We offered to repay her, but all she wants is for Lin and me to cook a
    > dinner for her. She's very well-traveled, but I'd like to make at least some
    > things she's probably never had before. Regarding her food likes and
    > dislikes, we know that she likes good-quality cheeses and fresh seafoods,
    > and she doesn't like most meats. (She was a vegetarian for years.) We
    > haven't set a specific date for the dinner, but I'd expect it to be
    > somewhere between November 30th and December 20th. Here's my tentative menu:
    >
    >
    > APPETIZER
    > Soy-cured salmon with asian pear and creme fraiche
    >
    > MAIN COURSE
    > Scallops with oyster mushrooms, butter, and raspberry vinegar
    > Shredded-parsnip pancakes
    > Broccolini
    >
    > DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    > Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    > slices
    >
    > DESSERT
    > Farina crema[1] with orange flower water, white chocolate, and pistachios
    >
    >
    > Does the menu need anything like a soup, salad, or more vegetables? Does the
    > broccolini need a sauce? What should we drink?
    >
    > Bob
    > [1]
    > http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/s...ipe/index.html
    >


    Bob:
    You create amazingly complex menus that usually give me the impression
    you are trying too hard.

    The scallop dish sounds rich enough to balance the bitterness of the
    broccolini. If anything, I'd top it with lightly sauteed sweet onion
    shreds.

    I really don't like any of the versions of farina/semolina custards. We
    had them often in Greece this spring and they are too grainy for my
    concept of a sweet. I'd much prefer just a baked creme type custard
    with the orange flower water and pistachios.

    I'd serve a medium-fruity white wine, a NZ sauv blanc or med. dry
    gewurtztraminer with dinner.

    (Burp)

    Excuse me and enjoy your dinner.

    gloria p





  9. #9
    Reggie Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:4ea9361c$0$21259$c3e8da3$[email protected] eb.com...
    > Lin has a very generous friend who has done big favors for us in the
    > recent past. We offered to repay her, but all she wants is for Lin and me
    > to cook a dinner for her. She's very well-traveled, but I'd like to make
    > at least some things she's probably never had before. Regarding her food
    > likes and dislikes, we know that she likes good-quality cheeses and fresh
    > seafoods, and she doesn't like most meats. (She was a vegetarian for
    > years.) We haven't set a specific date for the dinner, but I'd expect it
    > to be somewhere between November 30th and December 20th. Here's my
    > tentative menu:
    >
    >
    > APPETIZER
    > Soy-cured salmon with asian pear and creme fraiche
    >
    > MAIN COURSE
    > Scallops with oyster mushrooms, butter, and raspberry vinegar
    > Shredded-parsnip pancakes
    > Broccolini
    >
    > DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    > Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    > slices
    >
    > DESSERT
    > Farina crema[1] with orange flower water, white chocolate, and pistachios
    >
    >
    > Does the menu need anything like a soup, salad, or more vegetables? Does
    > the broccolini need a sauce? What should we drink?
    >
    > Bob
    > [1]
    > http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/s...ipe/index.html
    >


    I would alter the soy-salmon. I think soy is too commonplace.

    you might consider grilling (perhaps just a bit) the brocolinii.



  10. #10
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    Bull wrote:

    >> APPETIZER
    >> Soy-cured salmon with asian pear and creme fraiche
    >>
    >> MAIN COURSE
    >> Scallops with oyster mushrooms, butter, and raspberry vinegar
    >> Shredded-parsnip pancakes
    >> Broccolini
    >>
    >> DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    >> Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    >> slices
    >>
    >> DESSERT
    >> Farina crema[1] with orange flower water, white chocolate, and pistachios
    >>

    > Your menu sound great. Looking up umeboshi?


    EXTREMELY sour salty dried apricot/plum. Candying them will be an
    experiment, but I have every reason to believe it'll turn out well. I'll do
    a trial run first to avoid disaster.


    >> What should we drink?

    >
    > Pinot Gris from Oregon - something like this:
    >
    > http://langewinery.com/mercantool/mt...age_show&produ
    > ct=31&category_ID=5


    That would be good. I was also thinking about a Gewurztraminer or Riesling.
    I think the wine would have to be slightly sweet with medium body. Thanks
    for the suggestion.

    Bob



  11. #11
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    Janet wrote:

    > Sounds good to me apart from the scallops. I love scallops but would
    > not mess up their delicate flavour or texture with either mushrooms,
    > vinegar or parsnip.


    I've made this particular recipe many times before; it's always been
    well-received. Oyster mushrooms are delicately flavored, and the vinegar is
    just there to provide a slight tang and a nice raspberry flavor.

    The recipe comes from _The New West Coast Cuisine_[1], so maybe you have to
    live on the West Coast to appreciate it! :-)

    Bob
    [1] http://www.amazon.com/New-West-Coast.../dp/0874773598



  12. #12
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    Janet wrote:

    >> APPETIZER
    >> Soy-cured salmon with asian pear and creme fraiche
    >>
    >> MAIN COURSE
    >> Scallops with oyster mushrooms, butter, and raspberry vinegar
    >> Shredded-parsnip pancakes
    >> Broccolini
    >>
    >> DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    >> Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    >> slices
    >>
    >> DESSERT
    >> Farina crema[1] with orange flower water, white chocolate, and pistachios
    >>
    >>
    >> Does the menu need anything like a soup, salad, or more vegetables? Does
    >> the broccolini need a sauce? What should we drink?

    >
    > It sounds wonderful. It does hum a bit on the sweet side for me. I
    > would like something cold, crunchy and definitely savory and maybe
    > even tart


    That was one of my concerns, which is why I mentioned a salad. But what
    would meet that requirement, and where would it fit in the meal? And if I
    did add a salad, would that be too much food in total?

    Bob



  13. #13
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    Sqwertz wrote:

    >> DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    >> Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    >> slices

    >
    > Do you mean candied ume or umezuke? It would be pretty hard to candy
    > an already dried fruit.


    I plan to reconstitute it in a sugary brine over a period of about three
    days, cut it into chunks, dip the chunks into a boiling sugar syrup at the
    hard-crack stage, air-dry for a few hours, then dehydrate.

    Bob



  14. #14
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    Gloria wrote:

    > I really don't like any of the versions of farina/semolina custards. We
    > had them often in Greece this spring and they are too grainy for my
    > concept of a sweet. I'd much prefer just a baked creme type custard with
    > the orange flower water and pistachios.


    I'll reconsider that. Lin's not a big fan either. I like them fairly well;
    writing about them here in 2009:

    "The texture of this dessert is fascinating. It's not quite panna cotta, not
    quite mousse, not quite fine-grained tapioca pudding, but it's somewhere in
    between those three."

    I'm not sure whether our guest would like it all that well. She *might* like
    it because it might remind her of some years she lived in Israel, but I just
    don't know. I'll sound her out about it.


    > I'd serve a medium-fruity white wine, a NZ sauv blanc or med. dry
    > gewurtztraminer with dinner.


    Thanks!

    Bob



  15. #15
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    Steve wrote:

    >>>> DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    >>>> Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    >>>> slices
    >>>
    >>> Do you mean candied ume or umezuke? It would be pretty hard to candy
    >>> an already dried fruit.

    >>
    >> I plan to reconstitute it in a sugary brine over a period of about three
    >> days, cut it into chunks, dip the chunks into a boiling sugar syrup at
    >> the hard-crack stage, air-dry for a few hours, then dehydrate.

    >
    > I'm sorry I asked :-)


    It takes a lot of time from start to finish, but it's not much work. The
    marmalade will be more effort-intensive.

    Bob



  16. #16
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > Janet wrote:


    >> It sounds wonderful. It does hum a bit on the sweet side for me. I
    >> would like something cold, crunchy and definitely savory and maybe
    >> even tart

    >
    > That was one of my concerns, which is why I mentioned a salad. But what
    > would meet that requirement, and where would it fit in the meal? And if I
    > did add a salad, would that be too much food in total?


    It coulod be no more than a spiky greenish bed, though. One of my family
    favorites is slivers of Belgian endive dressed with just good olive oil
    whizzed with capers and then a few grinds of pepper. Clears the palate
    nicely. Looks good. Doesn't intrude much more than a garnish.



  17. #17
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    In article <4ea9ff95$0$8517$c3e8da3$[email protected] m>,
    virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz says...
    >
    > Janet wrote:
    >
    > > Sounds good to me apart from the scallops. I love scallops but would
    > > not mess up their delicate flavour or texture with either mushrooms,
    > > vinegar or parsnip.

    >
    > I've made this particular recipe many times before; it's always been
    > well-received. Oyster mushrooms are delicately flavored, and the vinegar is
    > just there to provide a slight tang and a nice raspberry flavor.


    I like oyster mushrooms and raspberries and vinegar. I just don't want
    them, and scallops, all in my mouth at the same time.
    >
    > The recipe comes from _The New West Coast Cuisine_[1], so maybe you have to
    > live on the West Coast to appreciate it! :-)


    I DO live on the West Coast...there is more than one country with a
    seabord, you know:-)

    Janet (Scotland).



  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    On Fri, 28 Oct 2011 12:00:06 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <4ea9ff95$0$8517$c3e8da3$[email protected] m>,
    > virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz says...
    > >
    > > Janet wrote:
    > >
    > > > Sounds good to me apart from the scallops. I love scallops but would
    > > > not mess up their delicate flavour or texture with either mushrooms,
    > > > vinegar or parsnip.

    > >
    > > I've made this particular recipe many times before; it's always been
    > > well-received. Oyster mushrooms are delicately flavored, and the vinegar is
    > > just there to provide a slight tang and a nice raspberry flavor.

    >
    > I like oyster mushrooms and raspberries and vinegar. I just don't want
    > them, and scallops, all in my mouth at the same time.
    > >
    > > The recipe comes from _The New West Coast Cuisine_[1], so maybe you have to
    > > live on the West Coast to appreciate it! :-)

    >
    > I DO live on the West Coast...there is more than one country with a
    > seabord, you know:-)
    >

    What does you living in Scotland have to do with the name of a
    cookbook?
    >



    --
    All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.

  19. #19
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    On Oct 27, 6:44*am, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > Lin has a very generous friend who has done big favors for us in the recent
    > past. We offered to repay her, but all she wants is for Lin and me to cook a
    > dinner for her. She's very well-traveled, but I'd like to make at least some
    > things she's probably never had before. Regarding her food likes and
    > dislikes, we know that she likes good-quality cheeses and fresh seafoods,
    > and she doesn't like most meats. (She was a vegetarian for years.) We
    > haven't set a specific date for the dinner, but I'd expect it to be
    > somewhere between November 30th and December 20th. Here's my tentative menu:
    >
    > APPETIZER
    > Soy-cured salmon with asian pear and creme fraiche
    >
    > MAIN COURSE
    > Scallops with oyster mushrooms, butter, and raspberry vinegar
    > Shredded-parsnip pancakes
    > Broccolini
    >
    > DRIFTING TOWARD DESSERT
    > Camembert with caramelized-onion marmalade, candied umeboshi, and apple
    > slices
    >
    > DESSERT
    > Farina crema[1] with orange flower water, white chocolate, and pistachios
    >
    > Does the menu need anything like a soup, salad, or more vegetables? Does the
    > broccolini need a sauce? What should we drink?
    >



    Sounds good. I would need three months in therapy just to get up the
    courage to tackle all that. I guess a light, white wine? I would not
    add any more to the menu.

    How many days ahead will you start all this stuff before D-day?
    Have you worked up a game plan yet?

  20. #20
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking for a friend

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > On Fri, 28 Oct 2011 12:00:06 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <4ea9ff95$0$8517$c3e8da3$[email protected] m>,
    > > virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz says...
    > > >
    > > > Janet wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Sounds good to me apart from the scallops. I love scallops but would
    > > > > not mess up their delicate flavour or texture with either mushrooms,
    > > > > vinegar or parsnip.
    > > >
    > > > I've made this particular recipe many times before; it's always been
    > > > well-received. Oyster mushrooms are delicately flavored, and the vinegar is
    > > > just there to provide a slight tang and a nice raspberry flavor.

    > >
    > > I like oyster mushrooms and raspberries and vinegar. I just don't want
    > > them, and scallops, all in my mouth at the same time.
    > > >
    > > > The recipe comes from _The New West Coast Cuisine_[1], so maybe you have to
    > > > live on the West Coast to appreciate it! :-)

    > >
    > > I DO live on the West Coast...there is more than one country with a
    > > seabord, you know:-)
    > >

    > What does you living in Scotland have to do with the name of a
    > cookbook?


    It's just a joke related to "maybe you have to live on the west coast"
    (to appreciate a cookbook about west coast cuisine).

    If you are still struggling to join up the dots, I live on the West Coast
    of Scotland which is rather famous for seafood cuisine.

    Janet



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