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Thread: Cooking cornish hen question

  1. #1
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question


    "FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    > roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    > foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    > spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for your help.
    >
    > Mark


    MY favorite roasting pan is a cast iron fry pan. If you seal them in foil,
    they will steam, not roast, and the skin will be rubbery.

    Any sort of pan will do. Pie plate, glass baking dish, etc.



  2. #2
    FERRANTE Guest

    Default Cooking cornish hen question

    I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?

    Thanks in advance for your help.

    Mark

  3. #3
    FERRANTE Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 18:30:17 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >>I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    >> roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    >> foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    >> spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance for your help.
    >>
    >> Mark

    >
    >MY favorite roasting pan is a cast iron fry pan. If you seal them in foil,
    >they will steam, not roast, and the skin will be rubbery.


    Thanks, I have a nice cast iron Dutch oven that will do the trick. Do
    you think it would be all right to add some potatoes on the side
    inside the Dutch oven? Also, these are average size birds and I have
    two of them. What temp would you cook them at and for about how long?
    It does not say on the wrapper as far as I can see.

    Thanks!
    Mark

  4. #4
    Chris Marksberry Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question


    >>>I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    >>> roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    >>> foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    >>> spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks in advance for your help.
    >>>
    >>> Mark

    >>
    >>MY favorite roasting pan is a cast iron fry pan. If you seal them in foil,
    >>they will steam, not roast, and the skin will be rubbery.

    >
    > Thanks, I have a nice cast iron Dutch oven that will do the trick. Do
    > you think it would be all right to add some potatoes on the side
    > inside the Dutch oven? Also, these are average size birds and I have
    > two of them. What temp would you cook them at and for about how long?
    > It does not say on the wrapper as far as I can see.
    >
    > Thanks!
    > Mark


    Here's my standard method for game hens:


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Game Hens

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 2 Preparation Time 00
    Categories : Chicken & Poultry Company
    Convection Oven

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 tablespoon butter or margarine -- melted
    1 teaspoon seasoned salt -- Lowry's
    1 each rock cornish game hen
    1 cup stuffing

    Stuff hens with prepared stuffing. Brush with melted butter. Roast on rack
    in 375 degrees oven for 1 hour 15 minutes or until done.

    Decrease cooking time to about 1 hour if using convection oven.





  5. #5
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    FERRANTE wrote:
    > I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    > roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    > foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    > spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for your help.
    >
    > Mark



    No point in covering them with foil at all. You can pick up a tinfoil
    roasting/baking pan in practically any grocery store or dollar store. Just
    roast the hen in one of those. Brush with a little butter, sprinkle with
    salt & pepper. The instructions are on the bag the cornish hen comes in.

    They used to be (not all of them are) stuffed with the gizzards. Check to
    make sure you don't leave them inside because they're usually wrapped in
    paper if they are in there. They aren't terribly difficult to cook. They
    are terribly tasty, though I roasted a couple last Christmas.

    Jill


  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 19:43:57 -0600, FERRANTE
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 18:30:17 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>>I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    >>> roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    >>> foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    >>> spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks in advance for your help.
    >>>
    >>> Mark

    >>
    >>MY favorite roasting pan is a cast iron fry pan. If you seal them in foil,
    >>they will steam, not roast, and the skin will be rubbery.

    >
    >Thanks, I have a nice cast iron Dutch oven that will do the trick. Do
    >you think it would be all right to add some potatoes on the side
    >inside the Dutch oven? Also, these are average size birds and I have
    >two of them. What temp would you cook them at and for about how long?
    >It does not say on the wrapper as far as I can see.
    >

    How big is your dutch oven? Sounds huge. If yours is like mine, you
    could lay the cornish hens on a bed of cubed potatoes to roast.

    This recipe looks like it would cook both the cubed potatoes and the
    chicken at about the same time.
    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/fo...d-Game-Hens-62


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  7. #7
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    FERRANTE <[email protected]>
    news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    > I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    > roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    > foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    > spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?


    Mark, just about any seasoning etc. you would use on chicken can be
    applied to the Cornish hens. You can go with very simple to really
    jazzed up. As for the roasting pan; If you don't want to invest in one
    right now you can buy one of those toss away roasting pans made of
    aluminum in any grocery store. They cost about a buck. If you can't do
    that, an oven proof casserole dish would do. I don't think I'd try the
    glass dish covered in foil thing. You can braise them if you don't want
    to roast them. The following is a recipe I've used for braising and it's
    adaptable enough for you to adjust about any way you want to. I think I
    got this from the allrecipes.com website quite some time ago but I'm not
    sure.


    Prep Time: 15 minutes
    Cook Time: 1 hour

    Ingredients:
    2 cups chicken broth, divided use
    14 ounces turnips, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
    1 Golden Delicious apple, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
    1/2 onion, peeled and chopped
    1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
    1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
    1/4 teaspoon fresh-grated nutmeg
    1/8 teaspoon dried rosemary
    12 ounces baking potatoes, baked until tender
    1 teaspoon butter
    1 teaspoon kosher salt
    Freshly ground black pepper
    3 (about 20 ounces each) Cornish game hens
    1 Tablespoon (about) browning sauce (such as Gravy Master or Kitchen
    Bouquet)
    1 Tablespoon butter
    1 Tablespoon olive oil
    1/4 cup Calvados, Applejack, or brandy
    1/2 cup unsweetened apple juice
    Red and green apple wedges and watercress for garnish

    Preparation:
    Place 1-1/4 cups of the chicken broth, turnips, apples, onions, oregano,
    thyme, nutmeg, and rosemary in a heavy saucepan. Cover and simmer about
    30 minutes until turnips are tender. Drain off liquid, reserving for
    later use, and return vegetables to the saucepan.

    Cut baked potatoes in half. Scoop out the flesh and add to the turnips in
    the saucepan along with 1 teaspoon butter, salt, and pepper. Coarsely
    mash the vegetables, leaving some large lumps. Let cool to room
    temperature.

    Rub the skin of the Cornish hens with the browning sauce. (This helps
    give that golden finish without adding flavor.) Stuff the hens with the
    vegetable mixture. Sew or skewer openings shut and tie legs together.

    Preheat oven at 425 degrees F.

    Heat a large, heavy, oven-proof skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high
    heat. When hot, add the olive oil and butter, swirling to coat the bottom
    of the pan. Brown Cornish hens on all sides, 6 to 8 minutes. Place
    browned hens on a platter and keep warm.

    Add Calvados to the skillet and boil, scraping up any browned bits, about
    30 seconds. Stir in remaining 3/4 cup chicken broth, apple juice, and
    reserved liquid from the vegetables. Boil briskly until thickened, about
    5 minutes.

    Return Cornish hens, breast-side up to the skillet and spoon liquid over
    the tops. Place in preheated oven, uncovered, and bake about 30 minutes
    until tender. Baste with the pan juices every 10 minutes.

    To serve, remove strings and skewers. Cut each Cornish hen in half
    lengthwise and place on a platter. Garnish with apple slices and
    watercress and pass the pan juices in a gravy boat.

    Yield: 6 servings

    Michael


    --
    "Men are pigs, but I love pork!"
    ~ Carson Kressley

    Find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  8. #8
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question


    "FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Thanks, I have a nice cast iron Dutch oven that will do the trick. Do
    > you think it would be all right to add some potatoes on the side
    > inside the Dutch oven? Also, these are average size birds and I have
    > two of them. What temp would you cook them at and for about how long?
    > It does not say on the wrapper as far as I can see.
    >
    > Thanks!
    > Mark


    If you add the potatoes, the cooking time may increase a little if space get
    tight. With room around them, I'd cook at 375 for about an hour. Add the
    potatoes and add maybe 15 minutes. Best to check with a meat thermometer
    and take them to 160.

    I'd also put a couple of carrots or celery stalks on the bottom to keep the
    hens out of the drippings.



  9. #9
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    On Sat 15 Nov 2008 05:09:53p, FERRANTE told us...

    > I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    > roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    > foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    > spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for your help.
    >
    > Mark
    >


    First off, Mark, roasting pans are cheap. Why donít you buy one?

    If not, a glass baking dish lined with foil, then sprayed with a quick
    release spray like Pam or Crisco will work just fine. You donít really need
    a rack. Elevate the hens on a bed of celery sticks, carrot sticks, and
    onions.

    Seasoning? That opens up a lot of choices. You can go completely savory by
    adding onions and garlic cloves to the cavity, along with rubbing the skin
    with butter and poultry seasoning. Lemon slices are good too, slipped under
    the skin.

    You could also make a stuffing, sweet or savory. They could also be glazed
    with a fruit glace like orange or cherry.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    (correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)
    ************************************************** **********************
    Date: Saturday, 11(XI)/15(XV)/08(MMVIII)
    ************************************************** **********************
    Countdown till U.S. Thanksgiving Day
    1wks 4dys 2hrs 42mins
    ************************************************** **********************
    I came, I saw, she conquered.
    ************************************************** **********************


  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    FERRANTE <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    > roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    > foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    > spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for your help.
    >
    > Mark


    A glass dish will work fine, but I never bother to cover them.
    A number of flavorings will work. I most often use garlic powder, fresh
    or ground rosemary and a little black pepper.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can't help them, at least don't hurt them." -- Dalai Lama

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    FERRANTE <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 18:30:17 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]. .
    > >>I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    > >> roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    > >> foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    > >> spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    > >>
    > >> Thanks in advance for your help.
    > >>
    > >> Mark

    > >
    > >MY favorite roasting pan is a cast iron fry pan. If you seal them in foil,
    > >they will steam, not roast, and the skin will be rubbery.

    >
    > Thanks, I have a nice cast iron Dutch oven that will do the trick. Do
    > you think it would be all right to add some potatoes on the side
    > inside the Dutch oven? Also, these are average size birds and I have
    > two of them. What temp would you cook them at and for about how long?
    > It does not say on the wrapper as far as I can see.
    >
    > Thanks!
    > Mark


    350 for maybe 45 minutes tops. Cornish hens are delicate.

    Spuds might need to be cooked a bit longer.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can't help them, at least don't hurt them." -- Dalai Lama

  12. #12
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    Omelet wrote:

    > 350 for maybe 45 minutes tops. Cornish hens are delicate.
    >
    > Spuds might need to be cooked a bit longer.


    I typically do two birds at a time. The average for my oven (at the same
    temp) is 1 hr., 15 min. Sometimes 1.5 hrs.

    I do like spatch-cocked bird, and on the grill it's wonderful. I think
    it was America's Test Kitchen that I learned about using skewers that
    made it easier to cook and maneuver the birds on a grill when spatch-cocked.

    Seasonings are as simple as salt, pepper and garlic. I do put a little
    olive oil on the birds as well. I have brined them before, but it was a
    bit too salty on the finish. I found brining to be a bit of overkill on
    such delicate little darlings.

    I'm with you on the potatoes. I love roasted taters, but I always
    parboil them in salted water and add them during the last 30-45 minutes
    of my cook time.

    --Lin

  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Lin <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    >
    > > 350 for maybe 45 minutes tops. Cornish hens are delicate.
    > >
    > > Spuds might need to be cooked a bit longer.

    >
    > I typically do two birds at a time. The average for my oven (at the same
    > temp) is 1 hr., 15 min. Sometimes 1.5 hrs.
    >
    > I do like spatch-cocked bird, and on the grill it's wonderful. I think
    > it was America's Test Kitchen that I learned about using skewers that
    > made it easier to cook and maneuver the birds on a grill when spatch-cocked.
    >
    > Seasonings are as simple as salt, pepper and garlic. I do put a little
    > olive oil on the birds as well. I have brined them before, but it was a
    > bit too salty on the finish. I found brining to be a bit of overkill on
    > such delicate little darlings.
    >
    > I'm with you on the potatoes. I love roasted taters, but I always
    > parboil them in salted water and add them during the last 30-45 minutes
    > of my cook time.
    >
    > --Lin


    I've spatchcocked and grilled cornish hens too. They are wonderful that
    way!
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can't help them, at least don't hurt them." -- Dalai Lama

  14. #14
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    "FERRANTE"
    >I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    > roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    > foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    > spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for your help.
    >
    > Mark


    Most of what Ed said is what I would advise, EXCEPT do not line with foil
    because then you can't slosh a bit of wine in and grt the browned bits off
    for a sauce. You'll end up losing a lot of flavor in the dishwater.
    I would not use my dutch oven because the sides are too high for good heat
    circulation. Lower is better.



  15. #15
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > "FERRANTE"
    >>I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    >> roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    >> foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    >> spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance for your help.
    >>
    >> Mark

    >
    > Most of what Ed said is what I would advise, EXCEPT do not line with
    > foil because then you can't slosh a bit of wine in and grt the browned
    > bits off for a sauce. You'll end up losing a lot of flavor in the
    > dishwater. I would not use my dutch oven because the sides are too
    > high for good heat circulation. Lower is better.
    >
    >
    >


    Most frypans can take at least 350F....put the bird(s) in a frypan. No
    lid, this will allow for making gravy on top of the stove, later on.

    The 350F restriction is mostly due to plastic handles...if your cookwear
    has metal handles go nutz.

    OR

    A cookie sheet will work in a pinch if it has a decent sized lip
    surrounding it. Cut the birds in half, place each half bird on a pile of
    stuffing (on the cookie sheet), season to your liking and go to town. The
    stuffing will absorb most of any liquids and the lip will prevent spillage
    from what the stuffing doesn't handle. I usually make up a stuffing by
    adding dried diced appricots etc... to a store bought prepared stuffing
    mix (not stovetop).

    Convection ovens do a fine job on birds.

    --

    The beet goes on -Alan




  16. #16
    FERRANTE Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question


    >>

    >How big is your dutch oven? Sounds huge. If yours is like mine, you
    >could lay the cornish hens on a bed of cubed potatoes to roast.


    Actually, the dutch oven is about 10 inches across and quite deep. I
    think it will work well. The recipe sounds good and thank you for it.

    Mark

  17. #17
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 18:09:53 -0600, FERRANTE
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    >roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    >foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    >spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >
    >Thanks in advance for your help.
    >
    >Mark


    I would think anything you do with chicken, you can do here.

    FWIW We had a discussion at one of our little Dinner Clubs over
    Cornish Game hens and the consensus was they are just young chickens.
    We all remarked how we'd never seen a Cornish Game hen farm. So after
    some googling, we discovered that there used to be Cornish Game hen
    farms, and there may be a few still left, but now Cornish Game Hens-
    for the most part are just young small chickens.

    aloha,
    Cea
    roast beans to kona to email
    farmers of Pure Kona

  18. #18
    FERRANTE Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    Wow, thanks everyone for all the great ideas. I certainly appreciate
    everyone's advice and I will post my results as well. Maybe I will do
    as others have done and take a pic to post of the end result.

    You do remember my pics of my first attempt at making meatballs, don't
    you...

    Thanks again!
    Mark

  19. #19
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    On Nov 15, 7:09 pm, FERRANTE <manthonyferra...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > I plan on cooking a couple of Cornish hens Sunday, but I do not have a
    > roasting pan. I have never cooked these before. Would sealing them in
    > foil work? A glass dish covered in foil? Also, any suggestions on any
    > spices to add that might enhance the flavor of the birds?
    >
    > Thanks in advance for your help.
    >
    > Mark


    I make do with the bottom of my broiler pan or I bet even a glass
    baking dish would do.


  20. #20
    Lass Chance_2 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking cornish hen question

    No problems!
    Just put those boys right on the rack of the oven with a cookie sheet
    UNDER them to catch the drippings, on the lower rack. It might be a
    good idea to cover the cookie sheet with foil and make a little edge to
    make sure the drippings STAY on the cookie sheet and not run into your
    oven, naking a mess.

    Or, you could mkake a "pan" out of the foil by putting down two or three
    layers and folding the edges up.

    OR you can just buy one of those alumininum disposable pans they sell
    this time of year for turkeys.

    I dont own a real roasting pan, either---I always "fake" it. Those
    disposable ones are a godsend.

    Lass


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