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Thread: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

  1. #1
    Dasco Guest

    Default Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!

    I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.



    Thanks - Dave





  2. #2
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    On Apr 5, 6:48*am, "Dasco" <cada...@SUPERhotmail.com> wrote:
    > Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!


    Not really. The best would be alt.food.barbecue
    >
    > I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    > cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    > preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.


    Gas grilling is not barbecuing.
    >
    > Thanks - Dave


    --Bryan

  3. #3
    Dasco Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie


    "Bobo Bonobo®" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Apr 5, 6:48 am, "Dasco" <cada...@SUPERhotmail.com> wrote:
    > Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!


    Not really. The best would be alt.food.barbecue
    >
    > I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    > cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    > preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.


    Gas grilling is not barbecuing.
    >
    > Thanks - Dave


    --Bryan

    Thanks!



  4. #4
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    On Apr 5, 6:48*am, "Dasco" <cada...@SUPERhotmail.com> wrote:
    > Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!
    >
    > I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    > cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    > preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.
    >
    > Thanks - Dave


    Dave,

    I have never cooked a chicken over a Gas Grill, however, I have cooked
    a game hen over a camp fire a few times. I like my birds marinated in
    some lemon, basil, and cooking white wine. Of course you can just buy
    a flavor you may like at the store. As for the temp. If you hold
    your hand about 8 to 10 inches above the coals and you find yourself
    moving your hand out of the way after 5 to 8 seconds the tempature is
    just right. Now it will take about 30 minutes to cook all the way
    through. Just remember to keep turning it...LOL.

    Pete

  5. #5
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie


    "Dasco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > "Bobo Bonobo®" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > On Apr 5, 6:48 am, "Dasco" <cada...@SUPERhotmail.com> wrote:
    >> Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!

    >
    > Not really. The best would be alt.food.barbecue
    >>
    >> I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    >> cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    >> preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.

    >
    > Gas grilling is not barbecuing.
    >>
    >>


    Saying "best would be alt.food.barbecue" and then indicating "Gas grilling
    is not barbecuing" makes yoose pinheads.

    In the US vernacular any covered grill is indeed a bbq. And any covered
    grill can be used to make bbq. Just because one prefers a particular
    cooking device and methodology does not in any way negate all others. Those
    who can actually cook know that real bbq begins with a hole in the ground,
    not some fercocktah welded hunk of steel drum-looking thingie. And unless
    one makes their own charcoal then they are phoney baloney backyard meat
    burners... using store bought charcoal is no different from calling heating
    a TV dinner cooking. Boasting about a particular cooking contraption to
    prepare whatever one terms bbq makes as much sense as claiming one can't
    cook as good a stew in a $5 second hand pot as in a $300 designer pot. And
    in fact perfectly good bbq can be made in a covered pot on the stovetop.
    A.F.B is much more about grown men arguing a religious experience than it is
    about cooking.

    And anyway the question is simple, it's about using a *rotisserie*...
    obviously yoose "pros" don't know or you'd not pull out your bbq bible.




  6. #6
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    On Sun, 5 Apr 2009 12:48:22 +0100, Dasco wrote:

    > Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!
    >
    > I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    > cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    > preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.
    >
    > Thanks - Dave


    i like this marinade for rotisserie chicken:

    chicken tunduri style

    one 3-4 lb chicken

    1 cup plain, full fat yogurt, if you can find the damned stuff

    2 tbls lemon juice

    1 tsp salt

    1/2 tsp dried chili pepper flakes

    1 tsp ground coriander (i used whole seeds ground in mortar & pestle)

    1/4 tsp anise (i use star anise ground in m & p)

    2 tbls oil

    *

    mix together all but chicken and oil. marinate chicken in mixture for
    24-48 hours in refrigerator, making sure some of the goop gets inside the
    chicken. when ready to cook, drain and brush outside of chicken with oil.

    i usually rotisserie the chicken, but she says to roast at 375 degrees f.
    she also says chicken can be split or quartered, so time will depend on
    that. if you charcoal it, watch it doesn't burn. (it takes me about an
    hour for a 3-4 lb. chicken, but i'm using an indoor electric grill.)

    this turns out a very moist chicken with tasty, brown skin. the wings are
    especially delicious, so make sure you snag them for yourself.

    (adapted from 'the complete book of oriental cooking,' by myra waldo, so
    take up any spelling or authenticity complaints with her.)

    your pal,
    blake

  7. #7
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    Dasco said...

    > Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!
    >
    > I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    > cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    > preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks - Dave



    Dave,

    Rotisserie has nothing to do with BBQ or grilling!

    Just baste the bird and stop the rotisserie and instant thermometer check
    for doneness every so often.

    Do tie the legs and wings up so they don't flail out and burn to a crisp!

    You also should be sure the chicken is snugly attached to the rotisserie so
    it doesn't slip during rotation.

    Best,

    Andy

  8. #8
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie


    "Bobo Bonobo®" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Apr 5, 6:48 am, "Dasco" <cada...@SUPERhotmail.com> wrote:
    > Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!


    Not really. The best would be alt.food.barbecue
    >
    > I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    > cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    > preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.


    Gas grilling is not barbecuing.
    >
    > Thanks - Dave


    --Bryan

    Yet you do not explain the difference. Rather that just criticize, teach.

    Grilling is cooking over high heat. Barbecuing, in the strict sense of the
    term, it cooking over very low heat for a long time. Brisket and pork
    shoulder require long cooking times to tenderize the meat.

    Barbecue has, however, taken on the meaning that includes most any form of
    outdoor cooking. Purists refuse to give in to the use of the term that tens
    of millions use every day.

    Rotisserie cooking is usually be done with a medium heat (about 350 - 400
    degrees) until the bird is properly cooked internally. Be sure to tie it up
    well so wings and legs don't flail about and also keep it balanced too so
    rotation is smooth. I like rotisserie cooked meats.



  9. #9
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    On Apr 5, 8:33*am, "brooklyn1" <gravesen...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > "Dasco" <cada...@SUPERhotmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > *And unless
    > one makes their own charcoal then they are phoney baloney backyard meat
    > burners... using store bought charcoal is no different from calling heating
    > a TV dinner cooking. *


    Lump charcoal is not phoney, and I kind of *do* make my own charcoal
    by burning down seasoned hickory wood until it is about halfway to
    charcoal before I put on the meat. I keep lump around for inclement
    weather, as it is quicker and more convenient. In my oversized Weber
    chimney, I can start a lot of it rather quickly. I grill or Q 50+
    times a year. I grilled hamburgers for lunch yesterday over wood. My
    sister lives on an acre with lots of mature shagbarks, so I spend very
    little on lump.

    You would be correct only if stores only carried anthracite briquets.

    --Bryan

  10. #10
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > Dasco said...
    >
    >> Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!
    >>
    >> I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    >> cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    >> preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks - Dave

    >
    >
    > Dave,
    >
    > Just baste the bird.


    Andy, unless it's a very large piece of meat like a 50 lb pig that can
    require cooking 12 hours and, rotisserie cooking needs no basting, the
    primary purpose of food rotating while cooking is that's it's self basting,
    a chicken self bastes itself perfectly. The most important rule (should be
    Law) regarding rotisserie cooking is that one should never leave the the
    rotisserie while cooking, not even to piss... gotta find someone to take
    your watch or pee in your empty beer bottles. If for whatever reason the
    spit quits turning (like the food slips out of balance) won't be more than a
    few minutes before the food will incinerate.. someone must be present at all
    times to turn off the heat. A rotisserie is the best way to make true bbq
    meat, any kind of meat... use low indirect heat and keep it turning... folks
    who cook meat stationary don't know what real bbq is.




  11. #11
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    Dasco said...

    >> Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!
    >>
    >> I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    >> cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    >> preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.


    Enjoy! I don't have the same type of unit. I have what is called a
    vertical rotisserie (vertisserie) that sits on a counter. The methodology
    is close however except you probably dont have a proper way to save the
    drippings? Pity there as they make a wonderful almost roasted deep gravy.

    I generally use a decent dry rub but you can use a mix from the store if you
    like for starters. I often start with a premix and add to it.

    Since you are doing this over what is essentially an open flame, you
    probably want to first oil the chicken or perhaps 'lard' it (wrap in bacon,
    secure with metal scewers). You may find lightly stuffing it with
    vegetables (I like Bok Choy and mushrooms) works nicely.

    Do you have a lid for your unit? That will help. You want about 350F
    inside under the lid, can be lower (say 250F for longer time) but will want
    to raise to that at very end to crisp it nicely.

    My rule of thumb on timing is is more related to how the chicken looks. If
    the leg looks like it wants to fall off almost when you tweak it, it's
    perfect. The exterior should be mostly dark brown, almost carmelized a bit
    with the seasonings. How long that takes depends on the size of the bird.
    My estimates start with 30 mins per lb at about 350F but I check it closely
    for that last hour. Say a 4 lb roaster, at 1 hour I check and may adjust
    temps down a bit for that slower deep roasted flavor, then after 30 mins,
    rise up to 400F for a final crisping (15 mins? 10 mins?).

    The reason for the variation is it depends on how fatty that particular bird
    is and how often I opened the door to leech out some of the drippings from
    the pan ;-)



  12. #12
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    Dasco wrote:
    > Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!
    >
    > I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    > cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    > preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.
    >


    First of all, you probably have to remove the grill rack and /or use a
    drip pan. My gas BBQ has a fourth burner across the back for the
    rotisserie, which is damned handy.


    The next thing is to use small birds, the smaller the better, like the
    type that are just beg enough to spilt down the middle for two people.

    My favourite way to do them is to puree an onion or two along with a
    couple cloves of garlic, salt, pepper and cumin. Smear the mixture over
    the chicken and into the cavity. The temperature should not be too high,
    and that is going to depend on your BBQ. With mine, I use the rear
    rotisserie burner on low and the small birds cook in about 1 to 1-1/2
    hours. Baste with melted butter.

    Or... you can just season them well with salt and pepper and baste.


  13. #13
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    brooklyn1 said...

    > "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Dasco said...
    >>
    >>> Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!
    >>>
    >>> I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    >>> cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    >>> preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Thanks - Dave

    >>
    >>
    >> Dave,
    >>
    >> Just baste the bird.

    >
    > Andy, unless it's a very large piece of meat like a 50 lb pig that can
    > require cooking 12 hours and, rotisserie cooking needs no basting, the
    > primary purpose of food rotating while cooking is that's it's self
    > basting, a chicken self bastes itself perfectly. The most important
    > rule (should be Law) regarding rotisserie cooking is that one should
    > never leave the the rotisserie while cooking, not even to piss... gotta
    > find someone to take your watch or pee in your empty beer bottles. If
    > for whatever reason the spit quits turning (like the food slips out of
    > balance) won't be more than a few minutes before the food will
    > incinerate.. someone must be present at all times to turn off the heat.
    > A rotisserie is the best way to make true bbq meat, any kind of meat...
    > use low indirect heat and keep it turning... folks who cook meat
    > stationary don't know what real bbq is.



    brooklyn1,

    I always stop and stare at the "super-human"/"don't try this at home"
    chicken rotisserie machine at the wholesale club, with easily 35 or more
    birds on probably 10 spits-a-roatating.

    A thing of beauty!!! :9

    Best,

    Andy

  14. #14
    Jebediah Kornworthy Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie


    "Dasco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Not sure if this is the right newsgroup, but here goes!
    >
    > I've just fitted a rotisserie to my 3-burner gas bbq. I'd like to try
    > cooking a chicken. Can anyone give me advice on how to go about it? Ie
    > preparation of the chicken, cooking time, temperature etc.
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks - Dave
    >



    Hello Dave,

    I agree what others have said regarding "alt.food.barbecue" They're
    very knowledgeable in "alt.food.barbecue". Although I'm not an expert on
    the subject, you might want to learn/ask about brining the chicken also.
    From what I've heard brining the bird makes for very moist chicken. You
    might also want to look into getting a small smoke box that you can place
    inside your grill to give it some additional smoke flavor. Although this
    isn't what purists call real BBQ it does impart some smoke flavor. I use a
    small smoke box that I bought at BBQ galore and put hickory chips in it when
    I make hamburgers on the grill. With chicken you'd probably want to use
    lemon wood or orange wood although I haven't tried either one with chicken
    myself. Just some suggestions that you might want to run by some of the
    more experienced guys at "alt.food.barbecue".


    Good luck,

    Jeb




  15. #15
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 08:59:50 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Rotisserie has nothing to do with BBQ or grilling!


    I'd like to know how the OP was supposed to describe his heat source
    in a nutshell. What is it? Would I know what he was talking about?
    Gas bbq conjured up a perfect image for me. I knew what he meant.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  16. #16
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 08:59:50 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Rotisserie has nothing to do with BBQ or grilling!

    >
    > I'd like to know how the OP was supposed to describe his heat source
    > in a nutshell. What is it? Would I know what he was talking about?
    > Gas bbq conjured up a perfect image for me. I knew what he meant.



    It does for most people. The bbq purist though, will tell you that real bbq
    is slow cooked meat over a wood or wood burned to coals heat source. If
    you go to North Carolina and ask for a barbecue sandwich, you are going to
    get pulled pork, in Texas you will get brisket. In New England you'll get a
    piece of chicken that flared up with Kraft barbecue sauce on it cooked on a
    gas grill.



  17. #17
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie


    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Vy6Cl.16038$[email protected]..
    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:2ssht41sr5fbth6ftpgmjejt[email protected]..
    >> On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 08:59:50 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Rotisserie has nothing to do with BBQ or grilling!

    >>
    >> I'd like to know how the OP was supposed to describe his heat source
    >> in a nutshell. What is it? Would I know what he was talking about?
    >> Gas bbq conjured up a perfect image for me. I knew what he meant.

    >
    >
    > It does for most people. The bbq purist though, will tell you that real
    > bbq is slow cooked meat over a wood or wood burned to coals heat source.
    > If you go to North Carolina and ask for a barbecue sandwich, you are going
    > to get pulled pork, in Texas you will get brisket. In New England you'll
    > get a piece of chicken that flared up with Kraft barbecue sauce on it
    > cooked on a gas grill.
    >

    I don't know what they call bbq in your neighborhood but in my New England
    hood the homeies call this bbq, for a very small group, the real deal is
    done in a hole in the ground, over which they rotisserie a 300 pound hog,
    and I've seen a lotta sauce called cervesa, sangria, and tequilla but not a
    drop of Kraft bbq sauce: http://www.elboricua.com/roast_pig_BBQgrill.html






  18. #18
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    On Apr 5, 12:48*pm, "Jebediah Kornworthy" <nonyabit...@roadrunner.com>
    wrote:

    > With chicken you'd probably want to use
    > lemon wood or orange wood although I haven't tried either one with chicken
    > myself. * Just some suggestions that you might want to run by some of the
    > more experienced guys at "alt.food.barbecue".


    For chicken I like peach, apple or cherry. I a few years I'll have
    prunings from plum trees as well. Usually though, it's plain ol'
    hickory for economic reasons. The hickory is free.
    >
    > Good luck,
    >
    > Jeb


    --Bryan

  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Bobo Bonobo® <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Apr 5, 12:48*pm, "Jebediah Kornworthy" <nonyabit...@roadrunner.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > With chicken you'd probably want to use
    > > lemon wood or orange wood although I haven't tried either one with chicken
    > > myself. * Just some suggestions that you might want to run by some of the
    > > more experienced guys at "alt.food.barbecue".

    >
    > For chicken I like peach, apple or cherry. I a few years I'll have
    > prunings from plum trees as well. Usually though, it's plain ol'
    > hickory for economic reasons. The hickory is free.
    > >


    Around here, it's mesquite. ;-d
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

  20. #20
    me Guest

    Default Re: Cooking chicken on BBQ using a rotisserie

    Bobo BonoBRAINO® wrote:
    > Usually though, it's plain ol' hickory for economic reasons. The hickory is free.


    No surprise there cheapskate.

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