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Thread: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

  1. #1
    SherryJubilee Guest

    Default Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?


    Hi everyone,

    I commented in another thread about cooking with bay leaves and would
    like to start a new thread for the subject. Do you all think that it's
    dangerous to cook with bay leaves? Some sources on the net say things
    like the quote below, and I'm thinking you might forget how many you
    used and miss removing one, which could be bad! (Believe it or not, I
    have found whole bay leaves inside enchilada dishes at restaurants in
    Mexico. They were well hidden and the first time I found one, it wasn't
    until it was in my mouth!)

    -
    "Many people got the mistaken notion that bay leaves are somehow
    poisonous -- they are not. The problems had to do with the ingestion of
    the splinterlike stem that runs down the middle of the leaf. When
    swallowed tthe stems punctured the intestinal tract (!) requiring
    surgery."- from 'St. Petersburg Times - Google News Archive Search'
    (http://tinyurl.com/y32zced)

    I appreciate hearing your opinions about this,
    Sherry




    --
    SherryJubilee

  2. #2
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    SherryJubilee wrote:
    >
    > I appreciate hearing your opinions about this,


    My opinion is foodbanter idiots should stay out of newsgroups.

  3. #3
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    On Apr 18, 3:06*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > SherryJubilee wrote:
    >
    > > I appreciate hearing your opinions about this,

    >
    > My opinion is foodbanter idiots should stay out of newsgroups.


    My stepfather choked on one one time. I like powdered bay leaf. It's
    much faster.

    --Bryan

  4. #4
    none of your business Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    On Apr 18, 3:19*pm, SherryJubilee <SherryJubilee.
    6111a79.884...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > Hi everyone,
    >
    > I commented in another thread about cooking with bay leaves and would
    > like to start a new thread for the subject. Do you all think that it's
    > dangerous to cook with bay leaves? Some sources on the net say things
    > like the quote below, and I'm thinking you might forget how many you
    > used and miss removing one, which could be bad! (Believe it or not, I
    > have found whole bay leaves inside enchilada dishes at restaurants in
    > Mexico. They were well hidden and the first time I found one, it wasn't
    > until it was in my mouth!)
    >
    > -
    > "Many people got the mistaken notion that bay leaves are somehow
    > poisonous -- they are not. The problems had to do with the ingestion of
    > the splinterlike stem that runs down the middle of the leaf. When
    > swallowed tthe stems punctured the intestinal tract (!) requiring
    > surgery."- from 'St. Petersburg Times - Google News Archive Search'
    > (http://tinyurl.com/y32zced)
    >
    > I appreciate hearing your opinions about this,
    > Sherry
    >
    > --
    > SherryJubilee


    It's simple, really. Either take them out before serving the food, or
    tell everyone "if you find a bay leaf, please don't eat it." Or
    both. Cooking with them is not dangerous; ingesting the stem is.
    Certainly not worth making a big deal about.

  5. #5
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    none of your business <cart[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Apr 18, 3:19*pm, SherryJubilee <SherryJubilee.
    > 6111a79.884...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > > Hi everyone,
    > >
    > > I commented in another thread about cooking with bay leaves and would
    > > like to start a new thread for the subject. Do you all think that it's
    > > dangerous to cook with bay leaves? Some sources on the net say things
    > > like the quote below, and I'm thinking you might forget how many you
    > > used and miss removing one, which could be bad! (Believe it or not, I
    > > have found whole bay leaves inside enchilada dishes at restaurants in
    > > Mexico. They were well hidden and the first time I found one, it wasn't
    > > until it was in my mouth!)
    > >
    > > -
    > > "Many people got the mistaken notion that bay leaves are somehow
    > > poisonous -- they are not. The problems had to do with the ingestion of
    > > the splinterlike stem that runs down the middle of the leaf. When
    > > swallowed tthe stems punctured the intestinal tract (!) requiring
    > > surgery."- from 'St. Petersburg Times - Google News Archive Search'
    > > (http://tinyurl.com/y32zced)
    > >
    > > I appreciate hearing your opinions about this,
    > > Sherry
    > >
    > > --
    > > SherryJubilee

    >
    > It's simple, really. Either take them out before serving the food, or
    > tell everyone "if you find a bay leaf, please don't eat it." Or
    > both. Cooking with them is not dangerous; ingesting the stem is.
    > Certainly not worth making a big deal about.


    Just put them in a tea ball or muslin bouquet garni' bag and there won't
    be an issue.

    Personally, I've tried them a couple of times and did not find that they
    added a significant flavor so just forget them most of the time now.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  6. #6
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    On Apr 18, 9:03*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In article
    > <9ab10b92-a29a-43c1-bc56-141947e92...@u21g2000yqc.googlegroups.com>,
    > *none of your business <cartgirl...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Apr 18, 3:19*pm, SherryJubilee <SherryJubilee.
    > > 6111a79.884...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > > > Hi everyone,

    >
    > > > I commented in another thread about cooking with bay leaves and would
    > > > like to start a new thread for the subject. Do you all think that it's
    > > > dangerous to cook with bay leaves? Some sources on the net say things
    > > > like the quote below, and I'm thinking you might forget how many you
    > > > used and miss removing one, which could be bad! (Believe it or not, I
    > > > have found whole bay leaves inside enchilada dishes at restaurants in
    > > > Mexico. They were well hidden and the first time I found one, it wasn't
    > > > until it was in my mouth!)

    >
    > > > -
    > > > "Many people got the mistaken notion that bay leaves are somehow
    > > > poisonous -- they are not. The problems had to do with the ingestion of
    > > > the splinterlike stem that runs down the middle of the leaf. When
    > > > swallowed tthe stems punctured the intestinal tract (!) requiring
    > > > surgery."- from 'St. Petersburg Times - Google News Archive Search'
    > > > (http://tinyurl.com/y32zced)

    >
    > > > I appreciate hearing your opinions about this,
    > > > Sherry

    >
    > > > --
    > > > SherryJubilee

    >
    > > It's simple, really. Either take them out before serving the food, or
    > > tell everyone "if you find a bay leaf, please don't eat it." * Or
    > > both. * Cooking with them is not dangerous; ingesting the stem is.
    > > Certainly not worth making a *big deal about.

    >
    > Just put them in a tea ball or muslin bouquet garni' bag and there won't
    > be an issue.
    >
    > Personally, I've tried them a couple of times and did not find that they
    > added a significant flavor so just forget them most of the time now.


    It takes a long time to coax the flavor out. That's why I usually use
    powdered.
    > --
    > Peace! Om


    --Bryan

  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Food SnobŪ <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > > It's simple, really. Either take them out before serving the food, or
    > > > tell everyone "if you find a bay leaf, please don't eat it." * Or
    > > > both. * Cooking with them is not dangerous; ingesting the stem is.
    > > > Certainly not worth making a *big deal about.

    > >
    > > Just put them in a tea ball or muslin bouquet garni' bag and there won't
    > > be an issue.
    > >
    > > Personally, I've tried them a couple of times and did not find that they
    > > added a significant flavor so just forget them most of the time now.

    >
    > It takes a long time to coax the flavor out. That's why I usually use
    > powdered.
    > > --
    > > Peace! Om

    >
    > --Bryan


    I have to wonder... The scent of the leaves is similar to eucalyptus so
    would small amounts of that work?
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  8. #8
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    SherryJubilee <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi everyone,
    >
    > I commented in another thread about cooking with bay leaves and would
    > like to start a new thread for the subject. Do you all think that it's
    > dangerous to cook with bay leaves?


    No.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  9. #9
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Food SnobŪ <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > > > It's simple, really. Either take them out before serving the food, or
    > > > > tell everyone "if you find a bay leaf, please don't eat it." * Or
    > > > > both. * Cooking with them is not dangerous; ingesting the stem is.
    > > > > Certainly not worth making a *big deal about.
    > > >
    > > > Just put them in a tea ball or muslin bouquet garni' bag and there won't
    > > > be an issue.
    > > >
    > > > Personally, I've tried them a couple of times and did not find that they
    > > > added a significant flavor so just forget them most of the time now.

    > >
    > > It takes a long time to coax the flavor out. That's why I usually use
    > > powdered.
    > > > --
    > > > Peace! Om

    > >
    > > --Bryan

    >
    > I have to wonder... The scent of the leaves is similar to eucalyptus so
    > would small amounts of that work?


    Noooo, you do not want eucalyptus flavour in your food. It's strong and
    will take over.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  10. #10
    Krypsis Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    On 19/04/2010 3:30 PM, Miche wrote:
    > In article<[email protected]>,
    > Omelet<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In article
    >> <[email protected]>,
    >> Food SnobŪ<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>>> It's simple, really. Either take them out before serving the food, or
    >>>>> tell everyone "if you find a bay leaf, please don't eat it." Or
    >>>>> both. Cooking with them is not dangerous; ingesting the stem is.
    >>>>> Certainly not worth making a big deal about.
    >>>>
    >>>> Just put them in a tea ball or muslin bouquet garni' bag and there won't
    >>>> be an issue.
    >>>>
    >>>> Personally, I've tried them a couple of times and did not find that they
    >>>> added a significant flavor so just forget them most of the time now.
    >>>
    >>> It takes a long time to coax the flavor out. That's why I usually use
    >>> powdered.
    >>>> --
    >>>> Peace! Om
    >>>
    >>> --Bryan

    >>
    >> I have to wonder... The scent of the leaves is similar to eucalyptus so
    >> would small amounts of that work?

    >
    > Noooo, you do not want eucalyptus flavour in your food. It's strong and
    > will take over.
    >
    > Miche
    >

    Yes, leave the eucalyptus leaves for the Koalas to get high on! ;-)

    Krypsis



  11. #11
    Brian Anasta Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    On Apr 19, 3:30*pm, Miche <michei...@gmail.com> wrote:

    > Noooo, you do not want eucalyptus flavour in your food. *It's strong and
    > will take over.
    >
    > Miche
    >


    The Eucalyptus leaves in freshly boiled 'Billy Tea', however, makes
    for a fantastic brew! Any fair dinkum Aussie WOULD know that

    Kind regards,
    Brian Anasta


  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Miche <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > I have to wonder... The scent of the leaves is similar to eucalyptus so
    > > would small amounts of that work?

    >
    > Noooo, you do not want eucalyptus flavour in your food. It's strong and
    > will take over.
    >
    > Miche


    ;-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  13. #13
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    On 4/18/2010 9:23 PM, Omelet wrote:
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Food SnobŪ<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>>> It's simple, really. Either take them out before serving the food, or
    >>>> tell everyone "if you find a bay leaf, please don't eat it." Or
    >>>> both. Cooking with them is not dangerous; ingesting the stem is.
    >>>> Certainly not worth making a big deal about.
    >>>
    >>> Just put them in a tea ball or muslin bouquet garni' bag and there won't
    >>> be an issue.
    >>>
    >>> Personally, I've tried them a couple of times and did not find that they
    >>> added a significant flavor so just forget them most of the time now.

    >>
    >> It takes a long time to coax the flavor out. That's why I usually use
    >> powdered.
    >>> --
    >>> Peace! Om

    >>
    >> --Bryan

    >
    > I have to wonder... The scent of the leaves is similar to eucalyptus so
    > would small amounts of that work?


    Not unless you want your sinuses opened up. We use eucalyptus oil in the
    Filter Queen vacuum for that.

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 21:23:21 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >I have to wonder... The scent of the leaves is similar to eucalyptus so
    >would small amounts of that work?


    IMO, bay is not even close to eucalyptus Om. Think of Vicks
    Vaporub... that's eucalyptus.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  15. #15
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 21:03:25 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article
    ><9ab10b92-a29a-43c1-bc56-141947e92ed4@u21g2000yqc.google[email protected]>,
    > none of your business <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Apr 18, 3:19*pm, SherryJubilee <SherryJubilee.
    >> 6111a79.884...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    >> > Hi everyone,
    >> >
    >> > I commented in another thread about cooking with bay leaves and would
    >> > like to start a new thread for the subject. Do you all think that it's
    >> > dangerous to cook with bay leaves? Some sources on the net say things
    >> > like the quote below, and I'm thinking you might forget how many you
    >> > used and miss removing one, which could be bad! (Believe it or not, I
    >> > have found whole bay leaves inside enchilada dishes at restaurants in
    >> > Mexico. They were well hidden and the first time I found one, it wasn't
    >> > until it was in my mouth!)
    >> >
    >> > -
    >> > "Many people got the mistaken notion that bay leaves are somehow
    >> > poisonous -- they are not. The problems had to do with the ingestion of
    >> > the splinterlike stem that runs down the middle of the leaf. When
    >> > swallowed tthe stems punctured the intestinal tract (!) requiring
    >> > surgery."- from 'St. Petersburg Times - Google News Archive Search'
    >> > (http://tinyurl.com/y32zced)
    >> >
    >> > I appreciate hearing your opinions about this,
    >> > Sherry
    >> >
    >> > --
    >> > SherryJubilee

    >>
    >> It's simple, really. Either take them out before serving the food, or
    >> tell everyone "if you find a bay leaf, please don't eat it." Or
    >> both. Cooking with them is not dangerous; ingesting the stem is.
    >> Certainly not worth making a big deal about.

    >
    >Just put them in a tea ball or muslin bouquet garni' bag and there won't
    >be an issue.


    I'll do the infuser thingie when there are other whole spices but
    typically I'll simply toss whole bay leaves into the pot. but I always
    count them and pull out the same number... pretty easy because no
    matter what dish I toss in three. I also only use the whole unboken
    leaves... those that are cracked I use in the infuser, broken bits go
    into the pickling spice jar.

  16. #16
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 19:06:23 -0700 (PDT), Food SnobŪ
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Apr 18, 9:03*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> In article
    >> <9ab10b92-a29a-43c1-bc56-141947e92...@u21g2000yqc.googlegroups.com>,
    >> *none of your business <cartgirl...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > On Apr 18, 3:19*pm, SherryJubilee <SherryJubilee.
    >> > 6111a79.884...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    >> > > Hi everyone,

    >>
    >> > > I commented in another thread about cooking with bay leaves and would
    >> > > like to start a new thread for the subject. Do you all think that it's
    >> > > dangerous to cook with bay leaves? Some sources on the net say things
    >> > > like the quote below, and I'm thinking you might forget how many you
    >> > > used and miss removing one, which could be bad! (Believe it or not, I
    >> > > have found whole bay leaves inside enchilada dishes at restaurants in
    >> > > Mexico. They were well hidden and the first time I found one, it wasn't
    >> > > until it was in my mouth!)

    >>
    >> > > -
    >> > > "Many people got the mistaken notion that bay leaves are somehow
    >> > > poisonous -- they are not. The problems had to do with the ingestion of
    >> > > the splinterlike stem that runs down the middle of the leaf. When
    >> > > swallowed tthe stems punctured the intestinal tract (!) requiring
    >> > > surgery."- from 'St. Petersburg Times - Google News Archive Search'
    >> > > (http://tinyurl.com/y32zced)

    >>
    >> > > I appreciate hearing your opinions about this,
    >> > > Sherry

    >>
    >> > > --
    >> > > SherryJubilee

    >>
    >> > It's simple, really. Either take them out before serving the food, or
    >> > tell everyone "if you find a bay leaf, please don't eat it." * Or
    >> > both. * Cooking with them is not dangerous; ingesting the stem is.
    >> > Certainly not worth making a *big deal about.

    >>
    >> Just put them in a tea ball or muslin bouquet garni' bag and there won't
    >> be an issue.
    >>
    >> Personally, I've tried them a couple of times and did not find that they
    >> added a significant flavor so just forget them most of the time now.

    >
    >It takes a long time to coax the flavor out.


    Not more than 20 minutes in a pot of soup... after 20 minutes may as
    well fish them out... in fact for stocks it's best to add the bouquet
    garni during the second half of cooking

    >That's why I usually use powdered.


    Powdered bay leaf hasn't much flavor to begin with... once ground bay
    leaf loses flavor fast.


  17. #17
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 17:30:11 +1200, Miche <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In article
    >> <[email protected]>,
    >> Food SnobŪ <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > > > It's simple, really. Either take them out before serving the food, or
    >> > > > tell everyone "if you find a bay leaf, please don't eat it." * Or
    >> > > > both. * Cooking with them is not dangerous; ingesting the stem is.
    >> > > > Certainly not worth making a *big deal about.
    >> > >
    >> > > Just put them in a tea ball or muslin bouquet garni' bag and there won't
    >> > > be an issue.
    >> > >
    >> > > Personally, I've tried them a couple of times and did not find that they
    >> > > added a significant flavor so just forget them most of the time now.
    >> >
    >> > It takes a long time to coax the flavor out. That's why I usually use
    >> > powdered.
    >> > > --
    >> > > Peace! Om
    >> >
    >> > --Bryan

    >>
    >> I have to wonder... The scent of the leaves is similar to eucalyptus so
    >> would small amounts of that work?

    >
    >Noooo, you do not want eucalyptus flavour in your food. It's strong and
    >will take over.


    May as well koala stew.

  18. #18
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    The message <[email protected]>
    from Omelet <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > I have to wonder... The scent of the leaves is similar to eucalyptus so
    > would small amounts of that work?


    It's nothing like eucalyptus.
    Eucalyptus is a common ingredient in embrocation/linement to
    relieve aches, pains and nasal congestion;
    unless you enjoy the flavour of horse liniment I wouldn't cook with
    eucalyptus leaves.

    Janet

  19. #19
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?

    sf wrote on Mon, 19 Apr 2010 07:00:10 -0700:

    >> I have to wonder... The scent of the leaves is similar to
    >> eucalyptus so would small amounts of that work?


    > IMO, bay is not even close to eucalyptus Om. Think of Vicks
    > Vaporub... that's eucalyptus.


    Gernot Katzer says that Bay Leaves are laurel leaves and there are quite
    unrelated plants in Asia that are also called Bay but I don't see any
    relation to eucalyptus. The major terpene component of laurel, cineol,
    does occur in eucalyptus too.

    You could have won a race at the old Olympic Games and dipped your crown
    in the food at the victory feast.
    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  20. #20
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: Cooking with Bayleaves - Is it dangerous?


    > On Apr 18, 3:19*pm, SherryJubilee <SherryJubilee.
    > 6111a79.884...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > > Hi everyone,
    > >
    > > I commented in another thread about cooking with bay leaves and would
    > > like to start a new thread for the subject. Do you all think that it's
    > > dangerous to cook with bay leaves?


    No, what nonsense. It's been used for millennia. I've grown and used
    them for 40 years, no problem.

    > > "Many people got the mistaken notion that bay leaves are somehow
    > > poisonous -- they are not. The problems had to do with the ingestion of
    > > the splinterlike stem that runs down the middle of the leaf.


    How could anyone miss a whole bayleaf in the dish? I've never seen one
    disintegrate

    Janet

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