Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    I tried an oatmeal cookie recipe from the book "Monster Cookies"(?),
    which required shortening. Since I almost never buy Crisco, I thought
    I'd use spread instead. Trouble is, I doubt most people really want
    cookies the way those turned out - overly soft and cakelike. Would
    Crisco have made a difference? If not, when IS it a bad idea to use a
    substitute for shortening?

    Lenona.

  2. #2
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I tried an oatmeal cookie recipe from the book "Monster Cookies"(?),
    > which required shortening. Since I almost never buy Crisco, I thought
    > I'd use spread instead. Trouble is, I doubt most people really want
    > cookies the way those turned out - overly soft and cakelike. Would
    > Crisco have made a difference? If not, when IS it a bad idea to use a
    > substitute for shortening?
    >
    > Lenona.


    what is a spread? Do you mean the butter spreads that have extra water
    and air (and perhaps oil) pumped into them?
    Those are NEVER used for baking for the obvious problems.
    If you don't want to buy Crisco, there are some non-hydrogenated
    vegetable shortenings out there now. I looked at one just the other
    week, but can't recall the name. It cost something like $6 for a large
    can of it and I didn't need any so passed it up.

  3. #3
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I tried an oatmeal cookie recipe from the book "Monster Cookies"(?),
    > which required shortening. Since I almost never buy Crisco, I thought
    > I'd use spread instead. Trouble is, I doubt most people really want
    > cookies the way those turned out - overly soft and cakelike. Would
    > Crisco have made a difference? If not, when IS it a bad idea to use a
    > substitute for shortening?
    >
    > Lenona.



    Margarine or butter would have worked better. Look for the word
    "margarine" on the label, and 100 calories per tablespoon; don't assume
    it is margarine because it's a familiar brand and formed into sticks.

    You could also have used lard; that works well for baking.

    Bob

  4. #4
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I tried an oatmeal cookie recipe from the book "Monster Cookies"(?),
    > which required shortening. Since I almost never buy Crisco, I thought
    > I'd use spread instead. Trouble is, I doubt most people really want
    > cookies the way those turned out - overly soft and cakelike. Would
    > Crisco have made a difference?


    Yes!


    If not, when IS it a bad idea to use a substitute for shortening?

    Yes, spread(s) contain water changing the texture of the finished product.

    Dimitri


  5. #5
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    zxcvbob wrote:

    > You could also have used lard; that works well for baking.
    >
    > Bob


    The first time I heard of using lard for cookies was as a young wife I
    hosted a neighborhood cookie exchange. The couple across the street
    (Navy fighter pilot and wife from AZ) and they brought Biscochitos (I
    think I spelled that correctly?). They were sort of like snikerdoodles.
    Very nice, especially as they were representative of the area they grew up.

  6. #6
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    Goomba wrote:

    > If you don't want to buy Crisco, there are some non-hydrogenated
    > vegetable shortenings out there now. I looked at one just the other
    > week, but can't recall the name. It cost something like $6 for a large
    > can of it and I didn't need any so passed it up.


    Smart BalanceŽ It's not hydrogenated. I use it when a recipe calls for
    shortening.

    I think even CriscoŽ is coming in a non-hydrogenated version now since
    the food police are making trans-fats illegal.

  7. #7
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    On Jan 17, 3:15 pm, Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > lenona...@yahoo.com wrote:
    > > I tried an oatmeal cookie recipe from the book "Monster Cookies"(?),
    > > which required shortening. Since I almost never buy Crisco, I thought
    > > I'd use spread instead. Trouble is, I doubt most people really want
    > > cookies the way those turned out - overly soft and cakelike. Would
    > > Crisco have made a difference? If not, when IS it a bad idea to use a
    > > substitute for shortening?

    >
    > > Lenona.

    >
    > what is a spread? Do you mean the butter spreads that have extra water
    > and air (and perhaps oil) pumped into them?
    > Those are NEVER used for baking for the obvious problems.


    Good to know. However, I find the spread very useful whenever a cake
    recipe tells you to grease and flour the pans. Far better than trying
    to rub cold butter on the pan - not enough comes off the stick.


    > If you don't want to buy Crisco, there are some non-hydrogenated
    > vegetable shortenings out there now.


    It's just that I don't encounter that many recipes that demand
    shortening rather than butter, so it didn't seem worth buying. Do you
    have to refrigerate Crisco after opening it?

    Lenona.

  8. #8
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?


  9. #9
    zxcvbob Guest

  10. #10
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 15:18:52 -0600, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Goomba wrote:
    >
    >> If you don't want to buy Crisco, there are some non-hydrogenated
    >> vegetable shortenings out there now. I looked at one just the other
    >> week, but can't recall the name. It cost something like $6 for a large
    >> can of it and I didn't need any so passed it up.

    >
    >Smart BalanceŽ It's not hydrogenated. I use it when a recipe calls for
    >shortening.
    >
    >I think even CriscoŽ is coming in a non-hydrogenated version now since
    >the food police are making trans-fats illegal.


    In fact, I believe that the only Crisco that is now sold
    non-hydrogenated. Yep, just looked at my blue container and it says 0
    trans fats.
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  11. #11
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    The Cook wrote:
    > On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 15:18:52 -0600, Janet Wilder
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Goomba wrote:
    >>
    >>> If you don't want to buy Crisco, there are some non-hydrogenated
    >>> vegetable shortenings out there now. I looked at one just the other
    >>> week, but can't recall the name. It cost something like $6 for a large
    >>> can of it and I didn't need any so passed it up.

    >> Smart BalanceŽ It's not hydrogenated. I use it when a recipe calls for
    >> shortening.
    >>
    >> I think even CriscoŽ is coming in a non-hydrogenated version now since
    >> the food police are making trans-fats illegal.

    >
    > In fact, I believe that the only Crisco that is now sold
    > non-hydrogenated. Yep, just looked at my blue container and it says 0
    > trans fats.



    I'm pretty sure it is hydrogenated, it's just not
    *partially-hydrogenated* (that's where the trans-fats come from.)

    Bob

  12. #12
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > I tried an oatmeal cookie recipe from the book "Monster Cookies"(?),
    > which required shortening. Since I almost never buy Crisco, I thought
    > I'd use spread instead. Trouble is, I doubt most people really want
    > cookies the way those turned out - overly soft and cakelike. Would
    > Crisco have made a difference? If not, when IS it a bad idea to use a
    > substitute for shortening?
    >
    > Lenona.


    When you're baking. I believe the magic number has to be something like
    70% fat in the spread. They have water in them and some recent books
    have cautioned against substituting the spreads or reduced-fat
    margarines for vegetable shortening. You could do some research to
    find out what kind of results you'll get when baking the same recipe
    with butter, shortening, margarine, or oil.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller/100041
    -- a woman my age shouldn't
    have this much fun!

  13. #13
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    In article <6tesisFahdt1U3@mid.indivi[email protected]>,
    Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Those are NEVER used for baking for the obvious problems.


    Not quite true. You can't swap them willy-nilly but there are recipes
    that are formulated for use with the spreads.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller/100041
    -- a woman my age shouldn't
    have this much fun!

  14. #14
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Cookies: Can vegetable spread sub for shortening?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > It's just that I don't encounter that many recipes that demand
    > > shortening rather than butter, so it didn't seem worth buying. Do you
    > > have to refrigerate Crisco after opening it?
    > >
    > > Lenona.

    >
    > No.


    Try the sticks. I used to go through the 3# can in a reasonable amount
    of time. I can't even use the small can in a year. Now I just buy the
    sticks; each is sealed so you don't have to open the 'whole thing' all
    at once.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller/100041
    -- a woman my age shouldn't
    have this much fun!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32