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Thread: cobbler crust

  1. #1
    sf Guest

    Default cobbler crust


    I don't make cobblers very often (almost never), but I have decided
    that I want to make one with a chocolate crust. I'm only finding
    chocolate cobbler when I google, so how do I turn a regular crust into
    a chocolate crust? How much cocoa powder should I add to get it dark
    enough and how much sugar do I need to sweeten it up?

    TIA

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Sat 10 Jul 2010 02:24:35p, sf told us...

    >
    > I don't make cobblers very often (almost never), but I have
    > decided that I want to make one with a chocolate crust. I'm only
    > finding chocolate cobbler when I google, so how do I turn a
    > regular crust into a chocolate crust? How much cocoa powder
    > should I add to get it dark enough and how much sugar do I need to
    > sweeten it up?
    >
    > TIA
    >


    My best suggestion is to look for a chocolate shortbread recipe.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 21:53:56 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat 10 Jul 2010 02:24:35p, sf told us...
    >
    > >
    > > I don't make cobblers very often (almost never), but I have
    > > decided that I want to make one with a chocolate crust. I'm only
    > > finding chocolate cobbler when I google, so how do I turn a
    > > regular crust into a chocolate crust? How much cocoa powder
    > > should I add to get it dark enough and how much sugar do I need to
    > > sweeten it up?
    > >
    > > TIA
    > >

    >
    > My best suggestion is to look for a chocolate shortbread recipe.


    Shortbread, really? The recipe I have says to put the batter on the
    bottom of the pan, then add the fruit and syrup on top of it. The
    crust is supposed to rise to the top as it bakes. Do you think a
    shortbread recipe would do that?

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  4. #4
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Jul 10, 5:24*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > I don't make cobblers very often (almost never), but I have decided
    > that I want to make one with a chocolate crust. *


    Might not be a cobbler...since a cobbler has the fruit on the bottom
    and the "cobbler" on the top.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobbler_%28food%29



  5. #5
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Jul 10, 6:12*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 21:53:56 GMT, Wayne Boatwright



    > crust is supposed to rise to the top as it bakes. *Do you think a
    > shortbread recipe would do that?


    No...that ain't gonna happen.

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 15:16:50 -0700 (PDT), "Mr. Bill"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Jul 10, 5:24*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > > I don't make cobblers very often (almost never), but I have decided
    > > that I want to make one with a chocolate crust. *

    >
    > Might not be a cobbler...since a cobbler has the fruit on the bottom
    > and the "cobbler" on the top.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobbler_%28food%29
    >


    While looking for a recipe today, I found there were two kinds of
    crust... "plain crust" and "pastry crust". Plain crust is like a
    dropped biscuit dough and pastry crust is like a rolled pie crust.
    Some plain crusts start off on the bottom and end up on top, others
    start and finish on top. I'm thinking maybe I shouldn't tempt fate
    after all and just go with one I drop on top.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  7. #7
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Jul 10, 7:24*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 15:16:50 -0700 (PDT), "Mr. Bill"
    >
    > <bb0...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > On Jul 10, 5:24*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > > > I don't make cobblers very often (almost never), but I have decided
    > > > that I want to make one with a chocolate crust. *

    >
    > > Might not be a cobbler...since a cobbler has the fruit on the bottom
    > > and the "cobbler" on the top.

    >
    > >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobbler_%28food%29

    >
    > While looking for a recipe today, I found there were two kinds of
    > crust... "plain crust" and "pastry crust". *Plain crust is like a
    > dropped biscuit dough and pastry crust is like a rolled pie crust.
    > Some plain crusts start off on the bottom and end up on top, others
    > start and finish on top. *I'm thinking maybe I shouldn't tempt fate
    > after all and just go with one I drop on top.



    Get creative...that is how every recipe evolves!!

    Post your results...we are waiting!


  8. #8
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Sat 10 Jul 2010 03:12:20p, sf told us...

    > On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 21:53:56 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat 10 Jul 2010 02:24:35p, sf told us...
    >>
    >> >
    >> > I don't make cobblers very often (almost never), but I have
    >> > decided that I want to make one with a chocolate crust. I'm

    only
    >> > finding chocolate cobbler when I google, so how do I turn a
    >> > regular crust into a chocolate crust? How much cocoa powder
    >> > should I add to get it dark enough and how much sugar do I need

    to
    >> > sweeten it up?
    >> >
    >> > TIA
    >> >

    >>
    >> My best suggestion is to look for a chocolate shortbread recipe.

    >
    > Shortbread, really? The recipe I have says to put the batter on

    the
    > bottom of the pan, then add the fruit and syrup on top of it. The
    > crust is supposed to rise to the top as it bakes. Do you think a
    > shortbread recipe would do that?
    >


    Probably not, as I think about it. I nver make cobbler, but I'm
    assuming that most cobblers have a bisuit like topping, either in one
    sheet or cut in shapes and put on top. Maybe look for chocolate
    biscuits?

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    sf wrote:

    > Shortbread, really? The recipe I have says to put the batter on the
    > bottom of the pan, then add the fruit and syrup on top of it. The
    > crust is supposed to rise to the top as it bakes. Do you think a
    > shortbread recipe would do that?


    If you post the recipe you're trying to modify, it would be easier to figure
    out a possible solution. The cobbler recipes I've seen and made are not made
    in the way you describe. The two closest things I know to what you describe
    are buckle (cake batter with fruit, where the cake batter rises and envelops
    the fruit) and pandowdy (fruit and pie-crust-like batter, where the crust is
    cut up and pushed down into the fruit when the dessert is almost done
    baking).

    Bob




  10. #10
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Sat 10 Jul 2010 03:12:20p, sf told us...
    >
    >> On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 21:53:56 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat 10 Jul 2010 02:24:35p, sf told us...
    >>>
    >>>> I don't make cobblers very often (almost never), but I have
    >>>> decided that I want to make one with a chocolate crust. I'm

    > only
    >>>> finding chocolate cobbler when I google, so how do I turn a
    >>>> regular crust into a chocolate crust? How much cocoa powder
    >>>> should I add to get it dark enough and how much sugar do I need

    > to
    >>>> sweeten it up?
    >>>>
    >>>> TIA
    >>>>
    >>> My best suggestion is to look for a chocolate shortbread recipe.

    >> Shortbread, really? The recipe I have says to put the batter on

    > the
    >> bottom of the pan, then add the fruit and syrup on top of it. The
    >> crust is supposed to rise to the top as it bakes. Do you think a
    >> shortbread recipe would do that?
    >>

    >
    > Probably not, as I think about it. I nver make cobbler, but I'm
    > assuming that most cobblers have a bisuit like topping, either in one
    > sheet or cut in shapes and put on top. Maybe look for chocolate
    > biscuits?
    >


    That's how I see a cobbler, too. It's fruit with biscuits on top. When I
    made cobblers, I added sugar to the biscuit dough. You can also make a
    very good cobbler with drop biscuits on the top as opposed to cut ones.

    I'd add cocoa and a little extra sugar to a regular biscuit recipe.
    There's no eggs, so why not taste a teeny bit of the dough to see if
    it's chocolate and sweet enough.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  11. #11
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 00:41:46 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >That's how I see a cobbler, too. It's fruit with biscuits on top. When I
    >made cobblers, I added sugar to the biscuit dough. You can also make a
    >very good cobbler with drop biscuits on the top as opposed to cut ones.


    That's not the type of cobbler I am used to. I am used to cobbler
    with a pie crust type of dough...not biscuits. Maybe it is a regional
    thang..

    Christine
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  12. #12
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    Christine wrote:

    >> That's how I see a cobbler, too. It's fruit with biscuits on top. When I
    >> made cobblers, I added sugar to the biscuit dough. You can also make a
    >> very good cobbler with drop biscuits on the top as opposed to cut ones.

    >
    > That's not the type of cobbler I am used to. I am used to cobbler
    > with a pie crust type of dough...not biscuits. Maybe it is a regional
    > thang..


    I've seen both of those kinds of cobblers. What I *haven't* seen is what sf
    is describing, cobbler dough which starts out submerged and floats up
    through the fruit to end up on top. That doesn't sound like a cobbler to me.
    (Of course, it might be delicious in spite of its non-cobbler status.)

    Bob




  13. #13
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Sat 10 Jul 2010 10:48:11p, Christine Dabney told us...

    > On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 00:41:46 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>That's how I see a cobbler, too. It's fruit with biscuits on top.
    >>When I made cobblers, I added sugar to the biscuit dough. You can
    >>also make a very good cobbler with drop biscuits on the top as
    >>opposed to cut ones.

    >
    > That's not the type of cobbler I am used to. I am used to cobbler
    > with a pie crust type of dough...not biscuits. Maybe it is a
    > regional thang..
    >
    > Christine
    > http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com
    >


    It seems that in the South cobblers are usually very deepdish pies
    (read casserole dishes), with both a top and bottom pie pastry. Most
    other places, people tend to use a dough only on top that is more
    akin to a sweetened biscuit dough. Having grown up on the southern
    style, I usually find the other style disappointing.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  14. #14
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 07:39:38 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >It seems that in the South cobblers are usually very deepdish pies
    >(read casserole dishes), with both a top and bottom pie pastry. Most
    >other places, people tend to use a dough only on top that is more
    >akin to a sweetened biscuit dough. Having grown up on the southern
    >style, I usually find the other style disappointing.


    I was thinking it was a southern thang...the type with pastry. I
    like that kind better...

    Christine
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  15. #15
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Jul 10, 10:37*pm, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > If you post the recipe you're trying to modify, it would be easier to figure
    > out a possible solution. The cobbler recipes I've seen and made are not made
    > in the way you describe. The two closest things I know to what you describe
    > are buckle (cake batter with fruit, where the cake batter rises and envelops
    > the fruit) and pandowdy (fruit and pie-crust-like batter, where the crustis
    > cut up and pushed down into the fruit when the dessert is almost done
    > baking).


    Bob..do you remember the "impossible" pies that Bisquick always
    featured?...This might be something that could be done by adding a
    1/4 cup cocoa and 1/4 cup sugar to the dry mix.

    http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/rec...ler15073.shtml

    This recipe is a basic peach cobbler..but it has potential for
    development. I could see this with Amaretto mixed in with the peach
    mixture...with chocolate biscuits sounds good to me.




  16. #16
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    Mr. Bill wrote:

    > Bob..do you remember the "impossible" pies that Bisquick always
    > featured?...This might be something that could be done by adding a
    > 1/4 cup cocoa and 1/4 cup sugar to the dry mix.
    >
    > http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/rec...ler15073.shtml
    >
    > This recipe is a basic peach cobbler..but it has potential for
    > development. I could see this with Amaretto mixed in with the peach
    > mixture...with chocolate biscuits sounds good to me.


    In spite of the name on the recipe, that is clearly a buckle, not a cobbler.
    Cobblers have MUCH more fruit than crust, and that looked to be about
    fifty-fifty.

    But yes, if that's the kind of recipe sf is trying to modify, that would
    make sense. To make it chocolate, it might be tricky to add even amounts of
    cocoa powder and sugar; in most recipes there's usually at least twice as
    much sugar as cocoa (and often four times as much).

    I'm still waiting for sf to post the recipe she wants to modify, because
    we're second-guessing at this point. I'm also a bit curious as to what fruit
    is being used. I'm guessing raspberries.

    Bob




  17. #17
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > Christine wrote:
    >
    >>> That's how I see a cobbler, too. It's fruit with biscuits on top. When I
    >>> made cobblers, I added sugar to the biscuit dough. You can also make a
    >>> very good cobbler with drop biscuits on the top as opposed to cut ones.

    >> That's not the type of cobbler I am used to. I am used to cobbler
    >> with a pie crust type of dough...not biscuits. Maybe it is a regional
    >> thang..

    >
    > I've seen both of those kinds of cobblers. What I *haven't* seen is what sf
    > is describing, cobbler dough which starts out submerged and floats up
    > through the fruit to end up on top. That doesn't sound like a cobbler to me.
    > (Of course, it might be delicious in spite of its non-cobbler status.)


    What she describes sounds to me like those recipes for "impossible pie"
    that were on the Bisquick boxes.


    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  18. #18
    heyjoe Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 19:37:25 -0700, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > The cobbler recipes I've seen and made are not made
    > in the way you describe.


    Here's a recipe I use when I don't have anything but store bought peaches.
    Claims to be a cobbler.

    Peach Cobbler

    2 large peaches
    3/4 C. sugar
    (that's too much sugar for my taste, but this is the original recipe - not
    my modification)

    1/2 C. butter, melted

    1 C. all purpose flour
    2 tsp baking powder
    1/4 tsp salt
    3/4 C. sugar
    dash nutmeg

    3/4 C. milk


    Peel, slice and sugar the peaches. Set aside.

    Pour melted butter into an 8x8 baking dish.

    Mix flour, baking powder, salt, sugar and nutmeg. Stir in milk until just
    combined. Pour over butter. Top with peaches and accumulated peach juice.

    Bake at 375 F. for 45 minutes


    --
    Posting from groups.google.com or www.foodbanter.com or other web-forums
    dramatically reduces the chance of your post being read.
    Use the real usenet!
    Eternal-september is free, <http://www.eternal-september.org/>.

  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 15:25:20 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > > Christine wrote:
    > >
    > >>> That's how I see a cobbler, too. It's fruit with biscuits on top. When I
    > >>> made cobblers, I added sugar to the biscuit dough. You can also make a
    > >>> very good cobbler with drop biscuits on the top as opposed to cut ones.
    > >> That's not the type of cobbler I am used to. I am used to cobbler
    > >> with a pie crust type of dough...not biscuits. Maybe it is a regional
    > >> thang..

    > >
    > > I've seen both of those kinds of cobblers. What I *haven't* seen is what sf
    > > is describing, cobbler dough which starts out submerged and floats up
    > > through the fruit to end up on top. That doesn't sound like a cobbler to me.
    > > (Of course, it might be delicious in spite of its non-cobbler status.)

    >
    > What she describes sounds to me like those recipes for "impossible pie"
    > that were on the Bisquick boxes.


    That's what it sounds like to me too. I've made a couple of Paula
    Deen recipes and decided that she knows her sweets. The chocolate
    part was my own idea. I want chocolate and peach together.

    ``````````````
    Peach Cobbler
    Recipe courtesy Paula Deen

    Prep Time: 15 min Cook Time: 45 min Level:

    8 to 10 servings

    Ingredients

    4 cups peeled, sliced peaches
    2 cups sugar, divided
    1/2 cup water
    8 tablespoons butter
    1 1/2 cups self-rising flour
    1 1/2 cups milk
    Ground cinnamon, optional

    Directions

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

    Combine the peaches, 1 cup sugar, and water in a saucepan and mix
    well. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from the
    heat.

    Put the butter in a 3-quart baking dish and place in oven to melt.

    Mix remaining 1 cup sugar, flour, and milk slowly to prevent clumping.
    Pour mixture over melted butter. Do not stir. Spoon fruit on top,
    gently pouring in syrup. Sprinkle top with ground cinnamon, if using.
    Batter will rise to top during baking.

    Bake for 30 to 45 minutes.

    To serve, scoop onto a plate and serve with your choice of whipped
    cream or vanilla ice cream.


    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  20. #20
    heyjoe Guest

    Default Re: cobbler crust

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 14:22:47 -0700, sf wrote:

    > 1 1/2 cups self-rising flour


    SWAG
    cut the flour to 1-1/4 C
    add 1/4 C cocoa powder
    add an additional TBSP of butter


    --
    Posting from groups.google.com or www.foodbanter.com or other web-forums
    dramatically reduces the chance of your post being read.
    Use the real usenet!
    Eternal-september is free, <http://www.eternal-september.org/>.

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