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Thread: Clotted cream

  1. #1
    Anny Middon Guest

    Default Clotted cream

    A good friend is planning a very traditional tea party. She is serving
    scones and jams (along with other food) and commented that it's a shame you
    can't get clotted cream in the USA.

    Is this true? I did see it listed at amazon.com, but they're out of it with
    no mention of when it might become available. Is there anywhere else I can
    get some through mail order?

    If not, is there reasonable facsiimile thereof I could make or buy? I'd
    love to surprise her with some.

    Thanks!

    Anny



  2. #2
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    On 2008-02-27, Anny Middon <[email protected]> wrote:

    > can't get clotted cream in the USA.


    I've had no problem finding it. Not likely found at the corner store or
    7-11, but most supermarkets carry it in the refrigerated section.

    nb

  3. #3
    Charlene Charette Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    Anny Middon wrote:
    > A good friend is planning a very traditional tea party. She is serving
    > scones and jams (along with other food) and commented that it's a shame you
    > can't get clotted cream in the USA.
    >
    > Is this true? I did see it listed at amazon.com, but they're out of it with
    > no mention of when it might become available. Is there anywhere else I can
    > get some through mail order?
    >
    > If not, is there reasonable facsiimile thereof I could make or buy? I'd
    > love to surprise her with some.


    I've gotten it at Cost Plus World Market.

    --Charlene


    --
    In a perfect world O.J. Simpson would have married Lorena Bobbitt. --
    Jason Love


    email perronnellec at earthlink . net

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 18:15:49 -0600, Charlene Charette wrote:

    > Anny Middon wrote:
    >> A good friend is planning a very traditional tea party. She is serving
    >> scones and jams (along with other food) and commented that it's a shame you
    >> can't get clotted cream in the USA.
    >>
    >> Is this true? I did see it listed at amazon.com, but they're out of it with
    >> no mention of when it might become available. Is there anywhere else I can
    >> get some through mail order?
    >>
    >> If not, is there reasonable facsiimile thereof I could make or buy? I'd
    >> love to surprise her with some.

    >
    > I've gotten it at Cost Plus World Market.


    Ouch. Wouldn't it need to be refrigerated? I can't imagine what
    they do to/add to it make t shelf stable.

    -sw

  5. #5
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 18:15:49 -0600, Charlene Charette wrote:
    >
    >> Anny Middon wrote:
    >>> A good friend is planning a very traditional tea party. She is
    >>> serving scones and jams (along with other food) and commented that
    >>> it's a shame you can't get clotted cream in the USA.
    >>>
    >>> Is this true? I did see it listed at amazon.com, but they're out
    >>> of it with no mention of when it might become available. Is there
    >>> anywhere else I can get some through mail order?
    >>>
    >>> If not, is there reasonable facsiimile thereof I could make or buy?
    >>> I'd love to surprise her with some.

    >>
    >> I've gotten it at Cost Plus World Market.

    >
    > Ouch. Wouldn't it need to be refrigerated? I can't imagine what
    > they do to/add to it make t shelf stable.


    Gamma radiation?

    Or was that for stabilizing the Hulk? I can't remember.

    --
    Dave
    www.davebbq.com



  6. #6
    David Scheidt Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    :Ouch. Wouldn't it need to be refrigerated? I can't imagine what
    :they do to/add to it make t shelf stable.

    Presumably, they do the same thing they do to other diary products
    shelf stable. Ultra-high temperature pasturization, and pack in
    aseptic packaging.

  7. #7
    Mark Allread Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    Anny Middon wrote:
    > A good friend is planning a very traditional tea party. She is serving
    > scones and jams (along with other food) and commented that it's a shame you
    > can't get clotted cream in the USA.
    >
    > Is this true? I did see it listed at amazon.com, but they're out of it with
    > no mention of when it might become available. Is there anywhere else I can
    > get some through mail order?
    >
    > If not, is there reasonable facsiimile thereof I could make or buy? I'd
    > love to surprise her with some.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Anny
    >
    >

    So, what is the difference between "clotted cream" and "sour cream"?
    I really don't know.

  8. #8
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    The message <[email protected]>
    from Mark Allread <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > So, what is the difference between "clotted cream" and "sour cream"?
    > I really don't know.


    Sour cream is cream fermented with a bacterial culture which gives
    the acid taste. It's a (relatively) low-fat cream.

    Clotted cream is made from rich milk with a very high butterfat
    content, which is slowly heated then left to set. A thick yellow crust
    forms on the top which is lifted off as the "clot" you eat.. It has a
    self-supporting texture like soft butter and a very high fat content.

    Not to be confused with cream thickened by beating it, or the addition
    of agar or other gels.

    Janet

  9. #9
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    On Feb 27, 9:07 pm, David Scheidt <dsche...@panix.com> wrote:
    > Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >
    > :Ouch. Wouldn't it need to be refrigerated? I can't imagine what
    > :they do to/add to it make t shelf stable.
    >
    > Presumably, they do the same thing they do to other diary products
    > shelf stable. Ultra-high temperature pasturization, and pack in
    > aseptic packaging.


    A process which pretty much ruins milk products.

    --Bryan

  10. #10
    Anny Middon Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    "Brawny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Feb 27, 6:23 pm, "Anny Middon" <AnnyMid...@hotNOSPAMmail.com>
    wrote:
    > If not, is there reasonable facsiimile thereof I could make or buy? I'd
    > love to surprise her with some.


    Amy...also look for Devon cream. This might be nice...

    Clotted Cream Recipe courtesy Alton Brown
    Show: Good Eats
    Episode: Strawberry Sky

    <recipe snipped>

    Thanks! That was what I was looking for. The recipes I looked at from my
    google for one all had other stuff (sour cream or cream cheese) added, which
    would I imagine give it a different flavor.

    Anny



  11. #11
    TerryinDTW Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    A thick yellow crust
    forms on the top which is lifted off as the "clot" you eat.. It has a
    self-supporting texture like soft butter and a very high fat content.

    > * Janet


    The Bar-Claw woman gives un an Amazing description of Sqwertz's penis.



  12. #12
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    Mark Allread wrote:
    > Anny Middon wrote:
    >
    >> A good friend is planning a very traditional tea party. She is
    >> serving scones and jams (along with other food) and commented that
    >> it's a shame you can't get clotted cream in the USA.
    >>
    >> Is this true? I did see it listed at amazon.com, but they're out of
    >> it with no mention of when it might become available. Is there
    >> anywhere else I can get some through mail order?
    >>
    >> If not, is there reasonable facsiimile thereof I could make or buy?
    >> I'd love to surprise her with some.
    >>
    >> Thanks!
    >>
    >> Anny
    >>
    >>

    > So, what is the difference between "clotted cream" and "sour cream"?
    > I really don't know.


    Sour cream is, well, sour. ;-) It's cultured.
    Clotted cream is sweet, not cultured.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
    Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  13. #13
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream



    Brawny wrote:
    >
    > On Feb 27, 6:23 pm, "Anny Middon" <AnnyMid...@hotNOSPAMmail.com>
    > wrote:
    > > If not, is there reasonable facsiimile thereof I could make or buy? I'd
    > > love to surprise her with some.

    >
    > Amy...also look for Devon cream. This might be nice...
    >
    > Clotted Cream Recipe courtesy Alton Brown
    > Show: Good Eats
    > Episode: Strawberry Sky
    >
    > 2 cups pasteurized (not ultra-pasteurized) cream
    >
    > Set a coffee filter basket, lined with a filter, in a strainer, over a
    > bowl. Pour the cream almost to the top of the filter. Refrigerate for
    > 2 hours. The whey will sink to the bottom passing through the filter
    > leaving a ring of clotted cream. Scrape this down with a rubber
    > spatula and repeat every couple of hours until the mass reaches the
    > consistency of soft cream cheese.


    Sounds nice but it isn't really clotted cream. That needs warmth, not
    refrigeration to form. Not so easy to make the real thing cos it doesn't
    work quite so well with pasteurised/ultrapasteurised cream.

    Try here:

    http://www.recipecottage.com/eggs-da...d-cream08.html

  14. #14
    Little Malice Guest

    Default Re: Clotted cream

    One time on Usenet, Mark Allread <[email protected]> said:
    > Kate Connally wrote:
    > > Mark Allread wrote:


    <snip>

    > >> So, what is the difference between "clotted cream" and "sour cream"?
    > >> I really don't know.

    > >
    > > Sour cream is, well, sour. ;-) It's cultured.
    > > Clotted cream is sweet, not cultured.


    > Thanks for the info, Kate and Janet!
    > Welcome to my killfile, TerryinDTW!
    > Until I know better, I'll consider clotted cream as being a product
    > somewhere between very heavy cream, and soft butter.
    > That sounds pretty good, actually.


    It's wonderful stuff. I've had it a couple of times at The Empress in
    Victoria, BC:

    http://www.fairmont.com/empress/Gues...s/AfternoonTea.
    htm


    --
    Jani in WA

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