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Thread: closed door broiling

  1. #1
    Jean B. Guest

    Default closed door broiling

    (which sucks, and which I never encountered before I got my lousy
    KA oven)... I am too lazy to look at the model number of my
    oven--and note that even in nonconvection mode the door must be
    closed. Here are some quotes:

    "Get Past The Traditional Downfalls Of Broiling

    Let's say that tonight you're preparing a little Italian cuisine.
    On the stovetop, your puttanesca sauce is just about finished
    reducing at a moderate simmer and the pasta is nearly al dente.
    You've just place the bruschetta into the oven on a baking sheet
    to toast under the broil element, but, because you have to leave
    the oven door slightly ajar while broiling, its difficult to reach
    the sauce and pasta over the roaring heat lpouring out of the open
    oven door. Using the broiler on traditional ranges can be
    frustrating and inconvenient. Applying its convection cooking mode
    to broiling, your KERS807SSS's Closed-Door Convection Broil lets
    you broil to your heart's content, with the door closed all the
    while. Enjoy bruschetta toasted under the broiler, while keeping
    the oven door closed and appreciating easy access to your stovetop
    delights."
    http://www.vanns.com/shop/servlet/it...aid-kers807sss

    or

    http://tinyurl.com/yceu75b

    # Oven Features
    # Cooking System Thermal Oven
    # Hidden Bake Element CleanBake™ Hidden Element
    # Bake Yes
    # Broil Closed-Door with Full & Center Selections
    # Cleaning System Self Clean with Variable Soil Level/Time Selections
    # Delayed Cooking Delayed Cooking & Cleaning
    # Bread Proofing Yes
    # Sabbath Mode Star-K Kosher Certified

    http://www.universal-akb.com/kebk171sbl.html

    etc.

    Maybe this is mainly a KitchenAid thing? Whatever it is, it is
    awful, and I will never get a KA oven again. (And I will make
    sure anything else I get operates in the correct manner!!!!)
    --
    Jean B.

  2. #2
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    On 2009-10-08, Jean B. <[email protected]> wrote:

    > # Sabbath Mode Star-K Kosher Certified


    I actually looked this up. Un....beeelievable.

    nb

  3. #3
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling


    "Jean B." ha scritto nel messaggio
    > Let's say that tonight you're preparing a little Italian cuisine.


    They need to come over for some Italian cookery lessons, say I.


    > You've just place the bruschetta into the oven on a baking sheet > to
    > toast under the broil element, but, because you have to leave > the oven
    > door slightly ajar while broiling, its difficult to reach > the sauce and
    > pasta over the roaring heat lpouring out of the open oven door. Using the
    > broiler on traditional ranges can be > frustrating and inconvenient.


    1. Broiling is a second rate way of making bruschetta.
    2. It's just this range, makes that point, actually, by saying it is
    different from all other electric ranges.



  4. #4
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    On 2009-10-08, Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > 1. Broiling is a second rate way of making bruschetta.


    What, pray tell, is the first rate way?

    nb

  5. #5
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling


    "notbob" ha scritto nel messaggio

    wrote:
    >
    >> 1. Broiling is a second rate way of making bruschetta.

    >
    > What, pray tell, is the first rate way?
    >
    > nb


    Grill on one side over open flame. We have these cheap little metal things
    we use on a gas burner or do them in the FP or on a grill. You should grill
    only the top side that gets scraped with garlic.



  6. #6
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    Jean B. said...

    > Maybe this is mainly a KitchenAid thing? Whatever it is, it is
    > awful, and I will never get a KA oven again. (And I will make
    > sure anything else I get operates in the correct manner!!!!)



    When temperature sensors measure heat, leaving an oven door open is a
    surefire way to burn out the electric elements as the sensor constantly will
    never "over-strive" to achieve the requested temp setting.

    That should've been plainly obvious to all the rfc brainiacs. Bozos, not so
    much! ;-)

    Andy

  7. #7
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    On 2009-10-08, Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Grill on one side over open flame. We have these cheap little metal things
    > we use on a gas burner or do them in the FP or on a grill. You should grill
    > only the top side that gets scraped with garlic.


    You mean I can't have my chèvre with dried tomatoes and fresh basil
    over prosciutto browned?

    nb

  8. #8
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    Giusi wrote:

    > Grill on one side over open flame. We have these cheap little

    metal
    > things we use on a gas burner or do them in the FP or on a grill.
    > You should grill only the top side that gets scraped with garlic.


    Once I raised a quasi - riot in a tuscan town, Capalbio, by asking
    in a pub if bruschette had to be grilled only on one side or both,
    everyone had theyr version. Me, for example, brown both the sides of
    the bread but add garlic, salt and oil only on one.
    --
    Vilco
    Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
    qualcosa da bere a portata di mano



  9. #9
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    On Oct 8, 8:56*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > Jean B. said...
    >
    > > Maybe this is mainly a KitchenAid thing? *Whatever it is, it is
    > > awful, and I will never get a KA oven again. *(And I will make
    > > sure anything else I get operates in the correct manner!!!!)

    >
    > When temperature sensors measure heat, leaving an oven door open is a
    > surefire way to burn out the electric elements as the sensor constantly will
    > never "over-strive" to achieve the requested temp setting.
    >
    > That should've been plainly obvious to all the rfc brainiacs. Bozos, not so
    > much! ;-)
    >
    > Andy


    "Never" overstrive, or always overstrive? I'm confused.

    My new electric Westinghouse oven doesn't say in the directions
    anywhere, to leave the door open during broiling. My previous ovens
    have always said to do so. I don't know which is correct, but since
    the direction booklet doesn't say to leave the door open a crack, I
    usually broil with it closed.

    N.

  10. #10
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    Nancy2 said...

    > On Oct 8, 8:56*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >> Jean B. said...
    >>
    >> > Maybe this is mainly a KitchenAid thing? *Whatever it is, it is
    >> > awful, and I will never get a KA oven again. *(And I will make
    >> > sure anything else I get operates in the correct manner!!!!)

    >>
    >> When temperature sensors measure heat, leaving an oven door open is a
    >> surefire way to burn out the electric elements as the sensor constantly

    w
    > ill
    >> never "over-strive" to achieve the requested temp setting.
    >>
    >> That should've been plainly obvious to all the rfc brainiacs. Bozos, not

    > so
    >> much! ;-)
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > "Never" overstrive, or always overstrive? I'm confused.
    >
    > My new electric Westinghouse oven doesn't say in the directions
    > anywhere, to leave the door open during broiling. My previous ovens
    > have always said to do so. I don't know which is correct, but since
    > the direction booklet doesn't say to leave the door open a crack, I
    > usually broil with it closed.
    >
    > N.



    Nancy2,

    Right! I oops'd.

    The temp sensor could overwork the heating element(s) to maintain the
    correct temp if the inside heat could constantly escape.

    Maybe let the finished dish rest inside with the door cracked open a bit to
    conserve limited counter space??

    Best,

    Andy

  11. #11
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    On Oct 8, 11:05*am, Nancy2 <nancy-doo...@uiowa.edu> wrote:
    > On Oct 8, 8:56*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >
    > > Jean B. said...

    >
    > > > Maybe this is mainly a KitchenAid thing? *Whatever it is, it is
    > > > awful, and I will never get a KA oven again. *(And I will make
    > > > sure anything else I get operates in the correct manner!!!!)

    >
    > > When temperature sensors measure heat, leaving an oven door open is a
    > > surefire way to burn out the electric elements as the sensor constantlywill
    > > never "over-strive" to achieve the requested temp setting.

    >
    > > That should've been plainly obvious to all the rfc brainiacs. Bozos, not so
    > > much! ;-)

    >
    > > Andy

    >
    > "Never" overstrive, or always overstrive? *I'm confused.
    >
    > My new electric Westinghouse oven doesn't say in the directions
    > anywhere, to leave the door open during broiling. *My previous ovens
    > have always said to do so. *I don't know which is correct, but since
    > the direction booklet doesn't say to leave the door open a crack, I
    > usually broil with it closed.



    I'm glad you said this. My mother always left the door open but I
    never understood why. But, dutiful daughter, I left it open until I
    wondered why one day. It never did make sense to be heating the
    kitchen just to broil something for a few minutes.

    My booklet says nada too.

    Wasn't there a poll on this a while back?


  12. #12
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    On Thu, 08 Oct 2009 08:56:17 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Jean B. said...
    >
    >> Maybe this is mainly a KitchenAid thing? Whatever it is, it is
    >> awful, and I will never get a KA oven again. (And I will make
    >> sure anything else I get operates in the correct manner!!!!)

    >
    >
    >When temperature sensors measure heat, leaving an oven door open is a
    >surefire way to burn out the electric elements as the sensor constantly will
    >never "over-strive" to achieve the requested temp setting.
    >
    >That should've been plainly obvious to all the rfc brainiacs. Bozos, not so
    >much! ;-)
    >
    >Andy


    You're one of the Bozos... with a stove/range there is no temperature
    setting in broil mode. In broil mode the thermostat is bypassed. The
    element is either full on or full off. In broil mode the element
    remains full on continuously. In bake mode the element cycles fully
    on and fully off however often necessary to maintain the set bake
    temperature. The element won't burn out quicker from being energized
    whether in broil mode or bake mode... elements are self regulating by
    wattage rating, same as a light bulb... they are not engineered to get
    hotter and hotter until they self destruct.

    Toaster ovens operate differently, their primary function is
    supposedly to toast, so the element is typically controlled similarly
    to an ordinary bread toaster, but with toaster ovens there are many,
    many varieties, having all kinds of bells, whistles, and functions...
    toaster ovens are multi use appliances, none of which performs nearly
    as well as with a dedicated appliance... I've never seen a toaster
    oven that toasts bread very well, because they only toast one side at
    a time, and I've never seen one where one can set the degree of
    doneness... I know of no toaster oven that's worthwhile having for any
    reason whatsoever. Anytime I'm in a kitchen where there is a toaster
    oven present I know that nobody cooks there.

  13. #13
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    brooklyn1 said...

    > Anytime I'm in a kitchen where there is a toaster
    > oven present I know that nobody cooks there.



    LOLOL!!!

    Andy


  14. #14
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    Giusi wrote:
    > "Jean B." ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> Let's say that tonight you're preparing a little Italian cuisine.

    >
    > They need to come over for some Italian cookery lessons, say I.
    >
    >
    >> You've just place the bruschetta into the oven on a baking sheet > to
    >> toast under the broil element, but, because you have to leave > the oven
    >> door slightly ajar while broiling, its difficult to reach > the sauce and
    >> pasta over the roaring heat lpouring out of the open oven door. Using the
    >> broiler on traditional ranges can be > frustrating and inconvenient.

    >
    > 1. Broiling is a second rate way of making bruschetta.
    > 2. It's just this range, makes that point, actually, by saying it is
    > different from all other electric ranges.
    >
    >

    Well, this seems to apply to at least many and perhaps all of the
    KA ovens.

    Funny about the bruschetta!

    --
    Jean B.

  15. #15
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    Nancy2 wrote:
    > On Oct 8, 8:56 am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >> When temperature sensors measure heat, leaving an oven door open is a
    >> surefire way to burn out the electric elements as the sensor constantly will
    >> never "over-strive" to achieve the requested temp setting.
    >>
    >> That should've been plainly obvious to all the rfc brainiacs. Bozos, not so
    >> much! ;-)
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > "Never" overstrive, or always overstrive? I'm confused.
    >
    > My new electric Westinghouse oven doesn't say in the directions
    > anywhere, to leave the door open during broiling. My previous ovens
    > have always said to do so. I don't know which is correct, but since
    > the direction booklet doesn't say to leave the door open a crack, I
    > usually broil with it closed.
    >
    > N.


    Oh come on (speaking through you to Andy)! You don't have much
    experience with electric ovens, I guess. EVERY electric oven I
    have had before this one had open-door broiling. That is the
    norm. (My KA is aberrant and despicable in this regard.) And I
    never burnt out an element.

    --
    Jean B.

  16. #16
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    On Thu 08 Oct 2009 11:00:04a, Jean B. told us...

    > Nancy2 wrote:
    >> On Oct 8, 8:56 am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >>> When temperature sensors measure heat, leaving an oven door open is a
    >>> surefire way to burn out the electric elements as the sensor
    >>> constantly will never "over-strive" to achieve the requested temp
    >>> setting.
    >>>
    >>> That should've been plainly obvious to all the rfc brainiacs. Bozos,
    >>> not so much! ;-)
    >>>
    >>> Andy

    >>
    >> "Never" overstrive, or always overstrive? I'm confused.
    >>
    >> My new electric Westinghouse oven doesn't say in the directions
    >> anywhere, to leave the door open during broiling. My previous ovens
    >> have always said to do so. I don't know which is correct, but since
    >> the direction booklet doesn't say to leave the door open a crack, I
    >> usually broil with it closed.
    >>
    >> N.

    >
    > Oh come on (speaking through you to Andy)! You don't have much
    > experience with electric ovens, I guess. EVERY electric oven I
    > have had before this one had open-door broiling. That is the
    > norm. (My KA is aberrant and despicable in this regard.) And I
    > never burnt out an element.
    >


    My Whirlpool range recommends closed door broiling, although it doesn't
    turn off the heating elements if you open the door.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  17. #17
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling


    > Oh come on (speaking through you to Andy)! *You don't have much
    > experience with electric ovens, I guess. *EVERY electric oven I
    > have had before this one had open-door broiling. *That is the
    > norm. *(My KA is aberrant and despicable in this regard.) *And I
    > never burnt out an element.
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -



    So have mine, Jean - but since the new Westinghouse doesn't say
    specifically to broil with the door open a crack, I don't do it. If
    they want people to crack the door while broiling, they will put it in
    big IMPORTANT letters in the directions.

    N.

  18. #18
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    On Thu, 08 Oct 2009 14:00:04 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Nancy2 wrote:
    >> On Oct 8, 8:56 am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >>> When temperature sensors measure heat, leaving an oven door open is a
    >>> surefire way to burn out the electric elements as the sensor constantly will
    >>> never "over-strive" to achieve the requested temp setting.
    >>>
    >>> That should've been plainly obvious to all the rfc brainiacs. Bozos, not so
    >>> much! ;-)
    >>>
    >>> Andy

    >>
    >> "Never" overstrive, or always overstrive? I'm confused.
    >>
    >> My new electric Westinghouse oven doesn't say in the directions
    >> anywhere, to leave the door open during broiling. My previous ovens
    >> have always said to do so. I don't know which is correct, but since
    >> the direction booklet doesn't say to leave the door open a crack, I
    >> usually broil with it closed.
    >>
    >> N.

    >
    >Oh come on (speaking through you to Andy)! You don't have much
    >experience with electric ovens, I guess. EVERY electric oven I
    >have had before this one had open-door broiling. That is the
    >norm. (My KA is aberrant and despicable in this regard.) And I
    >never burnt out an element.


    Even gas ovens require the door be cracked open when broiling.

    Do you actually believe she's telling the truth... do you actually
    believe her stove's owner's manual doesn't indicate to leave the oven
    door cracked open in the *detent*? Even a lying dingbat will know
    five minutes after putting food under the broiler that something is
    terribly wrong if they didn't leave the door cracked open... even if
    they can't read... the entire house will fill with smoke, the
    neighbors will call 911.

    I don't give a rat's B-hind what kinda cooking appliance, even a
    toaster oven, when broiling the door must be cracked open.

    Go here:
    http://www.white-westinghouse.com/do...06KW_om_en.pdf

    Scroll to pg. 12.
    Read broiling instructions.
    For those who cannot read... THERE'S A ****ING PICTURE!!! LOL LOL LOL
    Even reminds again in the Troubleshooting section. hehehe

    Friggin' LYING imbeciles... the most cooking they do is bowl o'
    cornflakes.

    Ahahahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .

  19. #19
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    I've never seen a toaster
    > oven that toasts bread very well, because they only toast one side at
    > a time, and I've never seen one where one can set the degree of
    > doneness... I know of no toaster oven that's worthwhile having for any
    > reason whatsoever. *Anytime I'm in a kitchen where there is a toaster
    > oven present I know that nobody cooks there.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    My toaster-oven toasts both sides simultaneously (by means of a
    reflective surface on the inside top) and the degree of toasting
    (browning) can be infinitely adjustable with the dial.

    I use my toaster oven for toasting bread and for baking frozen
    prepared foods, like crispy French fries. It's fast, easy, accurate,
    and doesn't mess up any appliance or my stove top, which is really
    nice when it's just one person's portion.

    N.

  20. #20
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: closed door broiling

    On Oct 8, 2:15*pm, Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwri...@arizona.usa.com>
    wrote:
    > On Thu 08 Oct 2009 11:00:04a, Jean B. told us...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Nancy2 wrote:
    > >> On Oct 8, 8:56 am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > >>> When temperature sensors measure heat, leaving an oven door open is a
    > >>> surefire way to burn out the electric elements as the sensor
    > >>> constantly will never "over-strive" to achieve the requested temp
    > >>> setting.

    >
    > >>> That should've been plainly obvious to all the rfc brainiacs. Bozos,
    > >>> not so much! ;-)

    >
    > >>> Andy

    >
    > >> "Never" overstrive, or always overstrive? *I'm confused.

    >
    > >> My new electric Westinghouse oven doesn't say in the directions
    > >> anywhere, to leave the door open during broiling. *My previous ovens
    > >> have always said to do so. *I don't know which is correct, but since
    > >> the direction booklet doesn't say to leave the door open a crack, I
    > >> usually broil with it closed.

    >
    > >> N.

    >
    > > Oh come on (speaking through you to Andy)! *You don't have much
    > > experience with electric ovens, I guess. *EVERY electric oven I
    > > have had before this one had open-door broiling. *That is the
    > > norm. *(My KA is aberrant and despicable in this regard.) *And I
    > > never burnt out an element.

    >
    > My Whirlpool range recommends closed door broiling, although it doesn't
    > turn off the heating elements if you open the door.
    >
    > --
    >


    Oops, my bad - my new oven is a Whirlpool, not Westinghouse - W'house
    was my last one.

    N.

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