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Thread: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

  1. #1
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    I can barely see my monitor through the smoke. LOL!

    I turned a burner on to heat water for tea a little while ago. After
    a few minutes, I noticed a burned smell, but chalked it up to the oven
    being on for heat.

    Then the smell got very strong. ****! I had turned the burner on
    under the rice leftover from last night's dinner. Thankfully, the lid
    was on the pan, because the rice was on fire.

    Took the pan outside to cool, and to reduce the amount of smoke in the
    house. Brought it back in, and man, is it black inside that thing!

    What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    with a copper bottom, if that helps.

    Carol

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  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    >Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    >with a copper bottom, if that helps.


    My algorithm is as follows: using detergent, if I cannot clean it with
    a dish sponge, I try cleaning it with a Tuffy (that being the name
    brand for a scrubber made from a jumble of yellow and orange plastic
    strands); if that does not work by itself, I use a nearly-dry
    slurry of coarse salt, which usually works. Sometimes it takes
    several go's at it with soaking in between.

    I will do the above for either stainless steel or enameled cast iron.
    However with stainless steel another option is steel wool.

    I would never, ever use oven cleaner.

    Just my opinion.

    Steve

  3. #3
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 15:35:31 +0000 (UTC), [email protected]
    (Steve Pope) wrote:

    >Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    >>Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    >>with a copper bottom, if that helps.

    >
    >My algorithm is as follows: using detergent, if I cannot clean it with
    >a dish sponge, I try cleaning it with a Tuffy (that being the name
    >brand for a scrubber made from a jumble of yellow and orange plastic
    >strands); if that does not work by itself, I use a nearly-dry
    >slurry of coarse salt, which usually works. Sometimes it takes
    >several go's at it with soaking in between.
    >
    >I will do the above for either stainless steel or enameled cast iron.
    >However with stainless steel another option is steel wool.
    >
    >I would never, ever use oven cleaner.
    >
    >Just my opinion.


    Thank you much. We have all of the above, and I'll scratch the idea
    of oven cleaner. We have a 21 year old male who lives with us and I'm
    sure will LOVE scouring that pan out. LOL!

    Thanks again,
    Carol

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    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  4. #4
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    > What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    > Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    > with a copper bottom, if that helps.
    >
    > Carol


    Start by wetting the pot on the inside and dumping in a half-inch thick
    layer of baking soda. Let it sit, undisturbed, overnight or for a day.
    Rinse it out and see what comes with it.
    A friend just made a mess of an All-Clad pan with some elderberry syrup
    gunk and she cleaned it by repeatedly boiling water in it.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Glorified Rice 2-24-2009

  5. #5
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    "Damsel in dis Dress" ha scritto nel messaggio >

    > Took the pan outside to cool, and to reduce the amount of smoke in the>
    > house. Brought it back in, and man, is it black inside that thing!
    >
    > What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    > Carol


    Boil water in it and then leave it overnight. Scrub away what you can with
    a metal scrubby. If it isn't enough, fill it with bleach water and boil it
    again, then leave it. The bleach has always got the last bits for me.



  6. #6
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    >
    > I can barely see my monitor through the smoke. LOL!
    >
    > I turned a burner on to heat water for tea a little while ago. After
    > a few minutes, I noticed a burned smell, but chalked it up to the oven
    > being on for heat.
    >
    > Then the smell got very strong. ****! I had turned the burner on
    > under the rice leftover from last night's dinner. Thankfully, the lid
    > was on the pan, because the rice was on fire.
    >
    > Took the pan outside to cool, and to reduce the amount of smoke in the
    > house. Brought it back in, and man, is it black inside that thing!
    >
    > What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    > Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    > with a copper bottom, if that helps.
    >
    > Carol


    Bummer that! Another trick might be to use a little bit of dishwasher
    machine detergent (that powdered stuff) in the pan and fill with hot
    water. Stir the detergent around to dissolve and let it soak for
    awhile, then apply the elbow-grease. The enzymes in the dishwasher
    detergent might help to breakup the burned char on the inside of the
    pan.

    Just a thought, but whenever I turn on the stove burner with a pan/pot
    of anything in it, I always use the timer to remind me I have a pan on a
    hot burner. There have been many times when this little precaution has
    saved a pan or few, not to mention the kitchen and house! After all, it
    is the "ultra ultimate kitchen rule"

    Sky

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice

  7. #7
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 09:45:00 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Just my opinion.

    >
    >Thank you much. We have all of the above, and I'll scratch the idea
    >of oven cleaner. We have a 21 year old male who lives with us and I'm
    >sure will LOVE scouring that pan out. LOL!


    You are so evil..LOL.

    Fix his favorite food, and I bet he would do it .....

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 09:57:32 -0600, Sky <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Just a thought, but whenever I turn on the stove burner with a pan/pot
    >of anything in it, I always use the timer to remind me I have a pan on a
    >hot burner. There have been many times when this little precaution has
    >saved a pan or few, not to mention the kitchen and house! After all, it
    >is the "ultra ultimate kitchen rule"


    I thought I was heating a whistling tea kettle, so it never occured to
    me to set the timer. The stove at this house has knobs in the
    opposite positions from the one at the other place. This isn't the
    first time this has happened, but this WAS the first fire. Hopefully,
    the last.

    Carol

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    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  9. #9
    Kajikit Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 09:21:44 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I can barely see my monitor through the smoke. LOL!
    >
    >I turned a burner on to heat water for tea a little while ago. After
    >a few minutes, I noticed a burned smell, but chalked it up to the oven
    >being on for heat.
    >
    >Then the smell got very strong. ****! I had turned the burner on
    >under the rice leftover from last night's dinner. Thankfully, the lid
    >was on the pan, because the rice was on fire.
    >
    >Took the pan outside to cool, and to reduce the amount of smoke in the
    >house. Brought it back in, and man, is it black inside that thing!
    >
    >What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    >Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    >with a copper bottom, if that helps.


    Put a whole bunch of baking soda in water into the pan and let it soak
    for an hour... then empty it out and put in a half-inch of water and a
    bunch more baking soda and start scrubbing. The baking soda softens
    the gunk and acts as a mild abrasive. I'm glad that you just burned
    the pot and not your whole kitchen! I turned the wrong burner on on
    our stove a few times lately, but luckily I was standing right there
    and realised before any damage was done.

  10. #10
    Dan S. Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    Damsel in dis Dress, if I was in the mood, I'd turn the lights down low
    and reply with soft music, but you'll have to accept this instead::
    > I can barely see my monitor through the smoke. LOL!
    >
    > I turned a burner on to heat water for tea a little while ago. After
    > a few minutes, I noticed a burned smell, but chalked it up to the oven
    > being on for heat.
    >
    > Then the smell got very strong. ****! I had turned the burner on
    > under the rice leftover from last night's dinner. Thankfully, the lid
    > was on the pan, because the rice was on fire.
    >
    > Took the pan outside to cool, and to reduce the amount of smoke in the
    > house. Brought it back in, and man, is it black inside that thing!
    >
    > What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    > Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    > with a copper bottom, if that helps.
    >
    > Carol


    The nice thing about stainless steel, is that it's stainless. You only
    need to get foodstuff off. Any "stains" you are looking at are not
    embeded into the metal. You can scrub it with anything you want.
    Cleaser is a good one after a brillo scrubbing. Copper is a different
    story. Usually, a good scrub and polish is warranted a couple times a
    year.

    --
    Yours,
    Dan S.
    support your local money-changers guild



  11. #11
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    On Feb 25, 9:21*am, Damsel in dis Dress <carol-56inva...@charter.net>
    wrote:
    > I can barely see my monitor through the smoke. *LOL!
    >
    > I turned a burner on to heat water for tea a little while ago. *After
    > a few minutes, I noticed a burned smell, but chalked it up to the oven
    > being on for heat.
    >
    > Then the smell got very strong. *****! *I had turned the burner on
    > under the rice leftover from last night's dinner. *Thankfully, the lid
    > was on the pan, because the rice was on fire.
    >
    > Took the pan outside to cool, and to reduce the amount of smoke in the
    > house. *Brought it back in, and man, is it black inside that thing!
    >
    > What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    > Oven cleaner, maybe? * We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    > with a copper bottom, if that helps.
    >
    > Carol
    >
    > --
    > Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.


    I have had some success submersing the entire pan in a bucket of water
    with dishwasher soap in it and letting it soak. First, you'll have to
    scrape off everything you can (without gouging the bottom of the
    pan). I certainly won't hurt anything to try it.

    I bought some fancy motorcycle chrome cleaner at the Harley place to
    scour burned nylon (from a utensil) from the bottom of a stainless
    steel All-Clad pan that my son cooked. It took lots of elbow grease
    to get it off, but it was worth it. I can't remember the name of the
    tube of stuff, but it was manufactured to take melted rubber off
    chrome....like rubberized patches on motorcycle gear (or boot bottoms)
    becoming melted onto the hot exhaust pipe.

    N.

  12. #12
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    On Feb 25, 9:56*am, "Giusi" <decobabe...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "Damsel in dis Dress" *ha scritto nel messaggio >
    >
    > > Took the pan outside to cool, and to reduce the amount of smoke in the>
    > > house. *Brought it back in, and man, is it black inside that thing!

    >
    > > What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    > > Carol

    >
    > Boil water in it and then leave it overnight. *Scrub away what you can with
    > a metal scrubby. *If it isn't enough, fill it with bleach water and boil it
    > again, then leave it. *The bleach has always got the last bits for me.


    Boiling water works best on sugary burns - rice isn't.

    N.

  13. #13
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    On 2009-02-25, Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    > with a copper bottom, if that helps.


    If the pan has been heated high enough and long enough, the burn stains may
    be permenent. If it isn't too bad, use a stainless steel scrubby pad, soft
    scrub, and some serious scullery maid elbow grease to get most of it out.
    Fact is, high heat releases carbon from organic objects and drives it into
    the metal. You may never see a shiny bottom on that pan, again. I have a
    couple pans I've burned. All my mom's pans are like that.

    Never start heating a pan on high heat and walk away!!

    nb

  14. #14
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote>
    > Start by wetting the pot on the inside and dumping in a half-inch thick
    > layer of baking soda. Let it sit, undisturbed, overnight or for a day.
    > Rinse it out and see what comes with it.
    > A friend just made a mess of an All-Clad pan with some elderberry syrup
    > gunk and she cleaned it by repeatedly boiling water in it.
    > --
    > -Barb


    Sugar removal is much easier than starch... how quick we forget my
    internationally patented household ammonia method.



  15. #15
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    > I can barely see my monitor through the smoke. LOL!
    >
    > I turned a burner on to heat water for tea a little while ago. After
    > a few minutes, I noticed a burned smell, but chalked it up to the oven
    > being on for heat.
    >
    > Then the smell got very strong. ****! I had turned the burner on
    > under the rice leftover from last night's dinner. Thankfully, the lid
    > was on the pan, because the rice was on fire.
    >
    > Took the pan outside to cool, and to reduce the amount of smoke in the
    > house. Brought it back in, and man, is it black inside that thing!
    >
    > What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    > Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    > with a copper bottom, if that helps.
    >
    > Carol
    >



    Oven cleaner.

    If you want to try something milder first, there are 2 things you can
    try: (1) Pour in just enough full-strength household ammonia to cover
    the bottom, put the lid on tight, and let it sit overnight. The crud
    should scrape out pretty easily. (2) A heaping tablespoon of washing
    soda and enough warm water to cover the bottom. Let that sit overnight.
    (Washing soda is in a big yellow box near the detergent and borax.
    It's not the same as baking soda)

    Bob

  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I can barely see my monitor through the smoke. LOL!
    >
    > I turned a burner on to heat water for tea a little while ago. After
    > a few minutes, I noticed a burned smell, but chalked it up to the oven
    > being on for heat.
    >
    > Then the smell got very strong. ****! I had turned the burner on
    > under the rice leftover from last night's dinner. Thankfully, the lid
    > was on the pan, because the rice was on fire.
    >
    > Took the pan outside to cool, and to reduce the amount of smoke in the
    > house. Brought it back in, and man, is it black inside that thing!
    >
    > What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    > Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    > with a copper bottom, if that helps.
    >
    > Carol


    Carol, I deal with scorching by putting a layer of pure vinegar in the
    pan and letting it soak for a day or two. Putting it out in hot sunlight
    will help speed the process.
    --
    Peace! Om

    I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama

  17. #17
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    In article <go3og3$6ob$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:

    > Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >What's the best (easiest) way to get the burn stains out of the pan?
    > >Oven cleaner, maybe? We're dealing with stainless steel Revere Ware
    > >with a copper bottom, if that helps.

    >
    > My algorithm is as follows: using detergent, if I cannot clean it with
    > a dish sponge, I try cleaning it with a Tuffy (that being the name
    > brand for a scrubber made from a jumble of yellow and orange plastic
    > strands); if that does not work by itself, I use a nearly-dry
    > slurry of coarse salt, which usually works. Sometimes it takes
    > several go's at it with soaking in between.
    >
    > I will do the above for either stainless steel or enameled cast iron.
    > However with stainless steel another option is steel wool.
    >
    > I would never, ever use oven cleaner.
    >
    > Just my opinion.
    >
    > Steve


    I will use oven cleaner on cast iron, but NEVER on stainless. Yes I
    have to re-season my pan, but that's no big deal. <g>
    --
    Peace! Om

    I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    brooklyn1 wrote:

    > Sugar removal is much easier than starch... how quick we forget my
    > internationally patented household ammonia method.


    I think we all forgot is after the last two people reported back that it
    didn't work worth a Sheldon.

    -sw

  19. #19
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    x-no-archive: yes

    Omelet wrote:

    > Carol, I deal with scorching by putting a layer of pure vinegar in the
    > pan and letting it soak for a day or two. Putting it out in hot sunlight
    > will help speed the process.


    I've had good luck cooking water mixed with detergent or baking soda and
    vinegar?) in the pan in the past.

    Susan(

  20. #20
    Beartooth Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning a Really, Really Burned Pan

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 11:20:37 -0600, Omelet wrote:

    > Carol, I deal with scorching by putting a layer of pure vinegar in the
    > pan and letting it soak for a day or two. Putting it out in hot sunlight
    > will help speed the process.


    Baking soda is surprisingly alkaline; washing soda is even more
    so; ammonia is also alkaline, but I disremember how the strength compares
    to the other two. Dishwashing liquid (for the sink) and dishwasher
    chemical both also contain alkalis, strong ones in the stuff for the
    dishwasher.

    Vinegar contains acetic acid. Barkeeper's Friend, which will be
    with other cleaners in the store, uses oxalic acid as its active
    ingredient -- plus something that makes suds. It's sold especially for
    cleaning metals, and of course glass.

    If one of the alkalis helps but doesn't finish the job, rinse
    well, and use one of the acids. Then alternate. (I wouldn't mix them; the
    baking soda will froth prettily, but they basically neutralize one
    another.)

    Oven cleaner is jellied lye -- plain old sodium (a/o potassium)
    hydroxide -- and about the strongest alkali you can get. I'd keep trying
    the milder stuff for quite a few repetitions before I'd go to lye,
    jellied or not. (Drain cleaner is lye, and some stores also sell plain
    lye under its own name.)
    --
    Beartooth Staffwright, Neo-Redneck, Double Retiree,
    Not Quite Clueless Linux Power User

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