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Thread: Cleaning copper

  1. #1
    Nexis Guest

    Default Cleaning copper

    I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior. I am
    wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all copper, so
    that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home remedies,
    so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of the
    copper. Any ideas?

    thanks,

    kimberly
    --
    http://eating-sandiego.blogspot.com



  2. #2
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    "Nexis" wrote:
    > I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior. I am
    > wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all copper, so
    > that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home remedies,
    > so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of the
    > copper. Any ideas?


    You need to make a decision, do you want to cook with it or display
    that pan. If you decide to cook with it you will have to accept that
    it will tarnish, the tarnish will act as a protective coat, it will
    tarnish just so much and no more... the darkened copper is much better
    for cooking than a shiny reflective surface. If you insist on
    polishing off the tarnish each time you cook with that pan you will
    soon polish your way through the copper. If you choose to display
    that pan then polish it up as brightly as you can (there are many good
    copper polishes on the market) and then spray it with a laquer clear
    coat and put it on a shelf just to look at.

    Those are your options.

    If it's truly a tinned interior (not stainless steel) then if you cook
    with it the tin will wear and you will need to periodically have that
    pan retinned, an expensive operation. I would use that pan for
    display purposes only... there are plenty of very nice inexpnsive and
    utilitarian stainless steel braising pans.




  3. #3
    maxine in ri Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    On Sep 30, 4:39*pm, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    > I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior. Iam
    > wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all copper,so
    > that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home remedies,
    > so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of the
    > copper. Any ideas?
    >
    > thanks,
    >
    > kimberly


    Revere makes a copper cleaning powder that works fine with regular
    use. My Mom's 60 year old revereware pots and pans all look like new,
    still shiny on the stainless steel and copper parts. They're not
    great to cook with, but they look great.

    maxine in ri

  4. #4
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    maxine wrote on Tue, 30 Sep 2008 14:35:00 -0700 (PDT):

    > On Sep 30, 4:39 pm, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    >> I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned
    >> interior. I am wondering what is the best way to clean the
    >> outside, which is all copper, so that it will maintain it's
    >> beauty. I know there are alot of home remedies, so to speak,
    >> but I've also read that some can shorten the life of
    >> the copper. Any ideas?
    >>
    >> thanks,
    >>
    >> kimberly


    > Revere makes a copper cleaning powder that works fine with
    > regular use. My Mom's 60 year old revereware pots and pans
    > all look like new, still shiny on the stainless steel and
    > copper parts. They're not great to cook with, but they look
    > great.


    Ammonia removes copper oxide.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

  5. #5
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Je=DFus?= Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    Sheldon wrote:
    > "Nexis" wrote:
    >> I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior. I am
    >> wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all copper, so
    >> that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home remedies,
    >> so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of the
    >> copper. Any ideas?

    >
    > You need to make a decision, do you want to cook with it or display
    > that pan. If you decide to cook with it you will have to accept that
    > it will tarnish, the tarnish will act as a protective coat, it will
    > tarnish just so much and no more... the darkened copper is much better
    > for cooking than a shiny reflective surface. If you insist on
    > polishing off the tarnish each time you cook with that pan you will
    > soon polish your way through the copper. If you choose to display
    > that pan then polish it up as brightly as you can (there are many good
    > copper polishes on the market) and then spray it with a laquer clear
    > coat and put it on a shelf just to look at.
    >
    > Those are your options.
    >
    > If it's truly a tinned interior (not stainless steel) then if you cook
    > with it the tin will wear and you will need to periodically have that
    > pan retinned, an expensive operation. I would use that pan for
    > display purposes only... there are plenty of very nice inexpnsive and
    > utilitarian stainless steel braising pans.


    I agree. I'd much rather use more practical cookware (i.e stainless
    steel) for cooking, and leave the copper stuff for ornamental. Plus, I'm
    not wild about mixing copper and food together (despite any coatings).

  6. #6
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    On Sep 30, 5:58�pm, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    wrote:
    > �maxine �wrote �on Tue, 30 Sep 2008 14:35:00 -0700 (PDT):
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Sep 30, 4:39 pm, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    > >> I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned
    > >> interior. I am wondering what is the best way to clean the
    > >> outside, which is all copper, so that it will maintain it's
    > >> beauty. I know there are alot of home remedies, so to speak,
    > >> but I've also read that some can shorten the life of
    > >> the copper. Any ideas?

    >
    > >> thanks,

    >
    > >> kimberly

    > > Revere makes a copper cleaning powder that works fine with
    > > regular use. �My Mom's 60 year old revereware pots and pans
    > > all look like new, still shiny on the stainless steel and
    > > copper parts. �They're not great to cook with, but they look
    > > great.

    >
    > Ammonia removes copper oxide.


    And it also dulls and pits the copper.


  7. #7
    Laura from MomsRetro.com Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    I've had good luck just using lemon juice to clean copper. Some people
    add salt but I think that scratches.
    L


    ---------

    http://www.MomsRetro.com

  8. #8
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    On Sep 30, 4:35*pm, maxine in ri <weed...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Sep 30, 4:39*pm, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    >
    > > I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior.I am
    > > wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all copper, so
    > > that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home remedies,
    > > so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of the
    > > copper. Any ideas?

    >
    > > thanks,

    >
    > > kimberly

    >
    > Revere makes a copper cleaning powder that works fine with regular
    > use. *My Mom's 60 year old revereware pots and pans all look like new,
    > still shiny on the stainless steel and copper parts. *They're not
    > great to cook with, but they look great.
    >
    > maxine in ri


    One piece of my revereware is at least 75 years old. It's never been
    polished, looks like crap and is the best saucepan I've ever had.
    Lynn in Fargo

  9. #9
    Edwin Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper


    "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:MawEk.5503$[email protected]..
    >I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior. I
    >am wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all
    >copper, so that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home
    >remedies, so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of
    >the copper. Any ideas?
    >
    > thanks,
    >
    > kimberly
    > --
    > http://eating-sandiego.blogspot.com
    >
    >


    Sure is pretty isn't it.

    There are commercial copper cleaners that will work. I've decided to just
    let the copper go dark and save a lot of hassle of shining it every use, but
    that is a matter of choice. They get put away, not hung for display. IMO,
    the paste type polishes work better than the ones that are liquid and wiped
    on. Should take no more that a few minutes if you do it on a regular basis.

    For the inside, when done cooking let it soak in water or water with a few
    drops of detergent and it will clean right up. Too much scrubbing can wear
    the tin over time. Re-tinning a pan is about $60 to $80 depending on size.
    There are a few places that do it on a regular basis. You should be OK for
    a few years or more depending on use.

    I love cooking with copper as it heat so evenly. Wish I had bought some
    years ago. Both my Mauviel and Falk are stainless lined and the Falk has a
    brushed finish that can be cleaned with Barkeeper's Friend both inside and
    outside.
    www.copperpans.com



  10. #10
    Edwin Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper


    "Jeus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > I agree. I'd much rather use more practical cookware (i.e stainless steel)
    > for cooking, and leave the copper stuff for ornamental. Plus, I'm not wild
    > about mixing copper and food together (despite any coatings).


    Copper is extremely practical, cleans easily and has the best heat transfer
    of any cookware for even heating. Tinning will last years, but many brands
    have stainless lined to eliminate ever have to re-tin. Also allows you to
    use metal utensils if you like. There is no copper contact with the food at
    all.

    The only downside of copper is the price. Once you buy it though, the pans
    will last your lifetime as well as your kids and grandkids.



  11. #11
    dejablues Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper


    "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:MawEk.5503$[email protected]..
    >I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior. I
    >am wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all
    >copper, so that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home
    >remedies, so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of
    >the copper. Any ideas?


    Half a lemon, dipped in salt, shines copper right up.

    That being said, even if you never cook with it and just use it for
    decoration, copper will oxidize and get dull or turn a lovely shade of
    green, verdigris. This is called patination and is a desirable thing, unless
    you really love shiny things and do not care about your descendants taking
    your cookware onto "Antiques Roadshow" a hundred years from now.

    No matter what you do to it, copper will outlive you, so the shelf life of
    your pan shouldn't worry you.



  12. #12
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    On Tue 30 Sep 2008 01:39:59p, Nexis told us...

    > I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior.
    > I am wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all
    > copper, so that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of
    > home remedies, so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the
    > life of the copper. Any ideas?
    >
    > thanks,
    >
    > kimberly


    Use a cream type polish like Haggerty Copper Polish or Semi-Chrome in the
    tube. They are very effective and more gentle than any other kind.

    Need I say to never use anything but wood, silicone, or pastic implements
    inside the pan? Metal utensils will destroy the tin lining. Do *not*
    attempt to polish or use any abrasives on the tin.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    *******************************************
    Date: Tuesday, 09(IX)/30(XXX)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    5wks 6dys 3hrs 16mins
    *******************************************
    Radioactive cats have 18 half-lives.
    *******************************************


  13. #13
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Je=DFus?= Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
    > "Jeus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> I agree. I'd much rather use more practical cookware (i.e stainless steel)
    >> for cooking, and leave the copper stuff for ornamental. Plus, I'm not wild
    >> about mixing copper and food together (despite any coatings).

    >
    > Copper is extremely practical, cleans easily and has the best heat transfer
    > of any cookware for even heating. Tinning will last years, but many brands
    > have stainless lined to eliminate ever have to re-tin. Also allows you to
    > use metal utensils if you like. There is no copper contact with the food at
    > all.
    >
    > The only downside of copper is the price. Once you buy it though, the pans
    > will last your lifetime as well as your kids and grandkids.


    All quite true.
    I should have elaborated and mentioned SS pots and pans with copper
    base. Thats what I use anyway. As long as there is no direct food
    contact with the copper, all should be good.

  14. #14
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:MawEk.5503$[email protected]..
    >I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior. I
    >am wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all
    >copper, so that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home
    >remedies, so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of
    >the copper. Any ideas?
    >


    Good question. I wonder if there's a fix that causes a chemical reaction
    like what I clean silver with? A foil-lined glass bowl, couple spoonfuls of
    baking soda, couple spoonfuls of salt and steaming hot water. Stinks like
    ****, but does wonders on silver.


  15. #15
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper


    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Nexis" wrote:
    >> I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior. I
    >> am
    >> wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all copper,
    >> so
    >> that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home
    >> remedies,
    >> so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of the
    >> copper. Any ideas?

    >
    > You need to make a decision, do you want to cook with it or display
    > that pan. If you decide to cook with it you will have to accept that
    > it will tarnish, the tarnish will act as a protective coat, it will
    > tarnish just so much and no more... the darkened copper is much better
    > for cooking than a shiny reflective surface. If you insist on
    > polishing off the tarnish each time you cook with that pan you will
    > soon polish your way through the copper. If you choose to display
    > that pan then polish it up as brightly as you can (there are many good
    > copper polishes on the market) and then spray it with a laquer clear
    > coat and put it on a shelf just to look at.
    >
    > Those are your options.
    >
    > If it's truly a tinned interior (not stainless steel) then if you cook
    > with it the tin will wear and you will need to periodically have that
    > pan retinned, an expensive operation. I would use that pan for
    > display purposes only... there are plenty of very nice inexpnsive and
    > utilitarian stainless steel braising pans.
    >


    Thank you for the information, Sheldon. Any ideas how I can tell if it is
    real tin? It doesn't have any paperwork or anything of that sort,
    unfortunately. I may just decide to have it for display, since it is so
    beautiful, and I have lots of other pans to do actualy cooking in!

    Thanks again, you are a big help!

    kimberly
    --
    http://eating-sandiego.blogspot.com



  16. #16
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper


    "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:JKBEk.1787$x%.[email protected]..
    >
    > "Jeus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> I agree. I'd much rather use more practical cookware (i.e stainless
    >> steel) for cooking, and leave the copper stuff for ornamental. Plus, I'm
    >> not wild about mixing copper and food together (despite any coatings).

    >
    > Copper is extremely practical, cleans easily and has the best heat
    > transfer of any cookware for even heating. Tinning will last years, but
    > many brands have stainless lined to eliminate ever have to re-tin. Also
    > allows you to use metal utensils if you like. There is no copper contact
    > with the food at all.
    >
    > The only downside of copper is the price. Once you buy it though, the
    > pans will last your lifetime as well as your kids and grandkids.


    My current cookware is copper-core with SS, and I love it. I've never had
    cookware that heats this evenly! It has made cooking much more enjoyable

    kimberly
    --
    http://eating-sandiego.blogspot.com



  17. #17
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    "Nexis" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:MawEk.5503$[email protected]..
    >I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior. I
    >am wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all
    >copper, so that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home
    >remedies, so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of
    >the copper. Any ideas?
    >
    > thanks,
    >
    > kimberly


    I've been cooking with copper for almost 40 years and now live in a country
    where they don't sell copper polish. I use leftover lemon halves with salt.
    It does a great job.

    I have never heard of anyone polishing all the way through copper. The idea
    is ludicrous unless it is copper plated finish rather than copper lined with
    something.

    I am not fond of the pink copper takes on right after polishing, so I polish
    every 2-3 uses or when I look up at the rack and think it looks bad.

    Two of my pans are tin lined. Don't let them come to high temps empty.
    Before you have an accident, find the service you will use to re-tin so
    you're prepared. If it never happens, it will be a long time before you
    wear away the tin, but you will.

    I am devoted to my copper pieces collected over decades, and although it is
    wonderful to see them glow above the stove, their usefulness in the kitchen
    is more important. They aren't the best for everything, but for a lot.



  18. #18
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    On Wed 01 Oct 2008 01:33:59a, Nexis told us...

    > Thank you for the information, Sheldon. Any ideas how I can tell if it is
    > real tin? It doesn't have any paperwork or anything of that sort,
    > unfortunately. I may just decide to have it for display, since it is so
    > beautiful, and I have lots of other pans to do actualy cooking in!


    If it's unmarked, I've found the easiest way to tell if its real tin is by
    comparing to a stainless steel pan. Of course, if the finish in your new
    pan has a shiny polished look, it must be compared to shiny polished
    stainless steel. Likewise, if it's a brushed or satin look. The two
    metals have a different color. That is readily apparent, especially if
    it's a shiny polished finish. Tin is brighter, more silvery looking than
    stainless steel.

    FWIW, if you use a gentle copper cleaner on the exterior and never use a
    metal utensil on the interior, nor scour the interior with anything
    stronger than a soapy sponge, you'll have many years of use of the pan
    without it requiring professional maintenance. If it's a solid copper pan,
    I find it dificult to believe that one could actually "polish through the
    copper" as some have suggested. If the copper were that thin, the pan
    wouldn't be fit to cook in in the first place. It would be like trying to
    cook in a pan fashioned from aluminum foil. :-)

    Whether you choose to use it or display it, by all means enjoy it!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    *******************************************
    Date: Wednesday, 10(X)/01(I)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    5wks 5dys 18hrs 35mins
    *******************************************
    I like you, Sali. That's why I'm going
    to kill you last.
    *******************************************

  19. #19
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    On Oct 1, 4:33�am, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    > "Sheldon" <PENMAR...@aol.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Nexis" wrote:
    > >> I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior.. I
    > >> am
    > >> wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all copper,
    > >> so
    > >> that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home
    > >> remedies,
    > >> so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of the
    > >> copper. Any ideas?

    >
    > > You need to make a decision, do you want to cook with it or display
    > > that pan. �If you decide to cook with it you will have to accept that
    > > it will tarnish, the tarnish will act as a protective coat, it will
    > > tarnish just so much and no more... the darkened copper is much better
    > > for cooking than a shiny reflective surface. �If you insist on
    > > polishing off the tarnish each time you cook with that pan you will
    > > soon polish your way through the copper. �If you choose to display
    > > that pan then polish it up as brightly as you can (there are many good
    > > copper polishes on the market) and then spray it with a laquer clear
    > > coat and put it on a shelf just to look at.

    >
    > > Those are your options.

    >
    > > If it's truly a tinned interior (not stainless steel) then if you cook
    > > with it the tin will wear and you will need to periodically have that
    > > pan retinned, an expensive operation. �I would use that pan for
    > > display purposes only... there are plenty of very nice inexpnsive and
    > > utilitarian stainless steel braising pans.

    >
    > Thank you for the information, Sheldon. Any ideas how I can tell if it is
    > real tin? It doesn't have any paperwork or anything of that sort,
    > unfortunately. I may just decide to have it for display, since it is so
    > beautiful, and I have lots of other pans to do actualy cooking in!
    >
    > Thanks again, you are a big help!


    You really haven't described it, not even its dimensions and
    capacity... a braiser should have a lid too... is is flat, domed? It
    would be helpful if you posted a picture.

    Did it come with any liturature, a tag even? If it's quality cookware
    it should have a manufacturer's name embossed somewhere, usually at
    the bottom, but could be anywhere. If you can find a manufacturer's
    name then you can search the net for contact info... they will be able
    to tell you the particulars of this piece.

    High quality copper cookware is fairly thick walled, about 1/8" thick
    and is very utilitarian looking with no nooks and crannies for schmutz
    to accumulate, will actually be uncomfortably heavy and not at all
    decorative... thin copper is pretty useless as cookware, just
    something to polish. The thin walled kind with all sorts of hammered
    patterns, oddball configurations like ballooned out sides, and rolled
    edges is really only for display.

    You can search the net for <copper cookware> to see if any looks like
    yours. I would ask the person who gave it to you where they bought it
    so you can find out how to care for it.

    http://www.creativecookware.com/copp...FQZqswod5HH-FQ


  20. #20
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Cleaning copper

    "Nexis" wrote:
    > "Sheldon" wrote:
    > > "Nexis" wrote:
    > >> I received a copper "braising pan" as a gift. It has a tinned interior.. I
    > >> am
    > >> wondering what is the best way to clean the outside, which is all copper,
    > >> so
    > >> that it will maintain it's beauty. I know there are alot of home
    > >> remedies,
    > >> so to speak, but I've also read that some can shorten the life of the
    > >> copper. Any ideas?

    >
    > > You need to make a decision, do you want to cook with it or display
    > > that pan. �If you decide to cook with it you will have to accept that
    > > it will tarnish, the tarnish will act as a protective coat, it will
    > > tarnish just so much and no more... the darkened copper is much better
    > > for cooking than a shiny reflective surface. �If you insist on
    > > polishing off the tarnish each time you cook with that pan you will
    > > soon polish your way through the copper. �If you choose to display
    > > that pan then polish it up as brightly as you can (there are many good
    > > copper polishes on the market) and then spray it with a laquer clear
    > > coat and put it on a shelf just to look at.

    >
    > > Those are your options.

    >
    > > If it's truly a tinned interior (not stainless steel) then if you cook
    > > with it the tin will wear and you will need to periodically have that
    > > pan retinned, an expensive operation. �I would use that pan for
    > > display purposes only... there are plenty of very nice inexpnsive and
    > > utilitarian stainless steel braising pans.

    >
    > Thank you for the information, Sheldon. Any ideas how I can tell if it is
    > real tin? It doesn't have any paperwork or anything of that sort,
    > unfortunately. I may just decide to have it for display, since it is so
    > beautiful, and I have lots of other pans to do actualy cooking in!
    >
    > Thanks again, you are a big help!
    >
    > kimberly


    I need to comment and elaborate. After reading all the posts about
    polishing I realize that none of those copper polishers know anything
    about cooking, nothing more than to fry a mystery meat burger, maybe.
    Professional copper cookware used by real cooks is NEVER polished
    (they'd want to kill you if you ever polished their copper). Real
    professional copper cookware is supposed to become as dark as
    possible, giving it a shiny finish negates the entire purpose of
    cooking with copper.... shiny and smooth reflects heat, dull darkened
    surfaces absorb heat. Any decent cookware other than copper will have
    a roughened bottom, either abraded or machined in a pattern to reduce
    reflectivity and to increase surface area... anyone who attempts to
    scour their pot bottoms smooth and shiny is a certifiable kitchen
    imbecile. Copper cookware is not for high heat cooking, it's for
    delicate sauces and slowly cooked stews where the goal is even cooking
    at low temperatures. Also, copper cookware should never be used on
    electric elements, they can easily damage copper, at the very least
    they will permanently discolor the copper, but can easily cause
    melting to occur... even on gas cooktops never use temperatures above
    medium or copper will permanently discolor right through to the
    lining... stainless steel will discolor when over heated too.
    Professional copper cookware is quite expensive, a typical price for a
    6 quart brasier is well over $500... do you really think the person
    who gave you this gift would have spent so much? Real professional
    copper cookware would have definitely come with literature from the
    manufacturer, with a written warranty of course, and would be embossed
    with the manufaturer's name and logo I'm just guessing, but I doubt
    what you have is professional copper cookware, more likely some
    inexpensive jewelry looking for-show only decorative piece... it may
    even already be clear coated to keep it shiny, if so it's not for
    cooking, use it to hold a planter... we don't even know if it's
    copper, it may well be brass. All those who are explaining how to
    polish copper cookware know nothing about cooking and less than
    nothing about cookware.


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