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Thread: classic dish?

  1. #1
    Mike.. . . Guest

    Default classic dish?

    we all know that the uk has its classic dish of sunday roast, but what is
    the us equivilant? the burger?

    --
    Mike... . . . .
    remove clothing to email

  2. #2
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?

    On May 30, 9:47*am, "Mike.. . ." <i.willexpose.mys...@the.fells>
    wrote:
    > we all know that the uk has its classic dish of sunday roast, but what is
    > the us equivilant? the burger?
    >
    > --
    > Mike... . *. * . * *. *
    > remove clothing to email


    Pot Roast
    Baked Ham
    Baked Chicken
    Fried Chicken
    Baked Turkey
    and the list goes on and on and on......................

  3. #3
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?



    Mike.. . . wrote:
    > we all know that the uk has its classic dish of sunday roast, but what is
    > the us equivilant? the burger?
    >


    Ignoring the typical UK.food+drink.misc sarcasm.....

    The UK is such a small place regionalism probly is not the issue it is
    in the US.

    In many parts of the US the classic Sunday dinner was a chicken dinner.

    However in the North East a boiled dinner was often prepared for sundays
    in such a way as to obviate the need for cooking on the sabbath.

    And in the American south gumbos, Brunswick stew (boys had all day
    saturday to catch the squirrels catfish (shudder), sunday pork loin.

    But such 'sunday' dinners are really more a thing of the past these day,
    just not the big deal in the US as it was even in my youth in the 1950's
    in the pacific northwest where sunday dinner was more seasonal.

    A sunday ham was often started by me mum on friday or saturday to be
    served in the afternoon on sunday. And that primarily, as i recall,
    cause church services lasted so long the food was prepared in advance so
    as to only need be warmed and served.
    --
    JL


  4. #4
    Puester Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?

    Mike.. . . wrote:
    > we all know that the uk has its classic dish of sunday roast, but what is
    > the us equivilant? the burger?
    >



    Twenty or thirty years ago I'd have said roasted or fried
    chicken.
    Then many mothers went to work full time and wanted a little
    less
    effort, fuss, and bother on the weekend. Can't blame them.

    Are you being snide when you cite the burger? It sounds
    like it to me.
    If American men want Sunday roasts, let them do some of the
    cooking.

    gloria p

  5. #5
    skeeter Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?


    "Mike.. . ." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1j3rb1em8r0zg$.1e2kozj3sl3ht$.[email protected] ..
    > we all know that the uk has its classic dish of sunday roast, but what is
    > the us equivilant? the burger?
    >
    > --
    > Mike... . . . .
    > remove clothing to email
    >


    first we have our way with your mum, then we shove it in your bum.
    now get the hell out of here.


  6. #6
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?

    On May 30, 9:47*am, "Mike.. . ." <i.willexpose.mys...@the.fells>
    wrote:
    > we all know that the uk has its classic dish of sunday roast, but what is
    > the us equivilant? the burger?
    >
    > --
    > Mike... . *. * . * *. *
    > remove clothing to email


    Oh yeah...don't forget the Sunday Sloppy Joe!

  7. #7
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?


    "Joseph Littleshoes" wrote:
    >
    > Mike.. . . wrote:
    >> we all know that the uk has its classic dish of sunday roast, but what is
    >> the us equivilant? the burger?
    >>

    >
    > Ignoring the typical UK.food+drink.misc sarcasm.....


    There's no sarcasm, you are simply paranoid. In the US Sunday dinner is
    very likely to be burgers, especially grilled outdoors in mild weather.
    >
    > The UK is such a small place regionalism probly is not the issue it is in
    > the US.
    >
    > In many parts of the US the classic Sunday dinner was a chicken dinner.
    >
    >


    Today it's from KFC. Nowadays few US families do Sunday dinner... they eat
    catch as catch can... and the few times a year they manage to all eat as a
    family they go somewhere like Olive Garden, or more likely call in a
    pizza... and then one eats in front of their pc, another on their cell, and
    the rest on separate tvs... all in different rooms. I seriously doubt it's
    any different in the UK. Yoose view too many Norman Rockwells.




  8. #8
    Geoff Miller Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?



    Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> writes:

    [Sunday dinner]

    > And in the American south gumbos, Brunswick stew (boysa
    > had all day saturday to catch the squirrels catfish
    > (shudder), sunday pork loin.



    You shudder at the thought of eating catfish, but the idea
    of eating squirrels gets a pass? Gosh, Beave, that's kinda
    goofy.

    What's your objection to catfish? It has such a mild flavor,
    I can't imagine why anyone would dislike it.



    Geoff

    --
    "In some social circles, so I'm told, you don't
    start conversations with complete strangers by
    saying 'God damn those ****ing lusers!' and
    launching into a long tirade." --Paul Tomblin

  9. #9
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?

    Geoff wrote on Sat, 30 May 2009 13:37:33 -0500:

    > [Sunday dinner]


    >> And in the American south gumbos, Brunswick stew (boysa
    >> had all day saturday to catch the squirrels catfish
    >> (shudder), sunday pork loin.


    > You shudder at the thought of eating catfish, but the idea
    > of eating squirrels gets a pass? Gosh, Beave, that's kinda
    > goofy.


    > What's your objection to catfish? It has such a mild flavor,
    > I can't imagine why anyone would dislike it.


    Time to say it again! I try catfish once every year or two because
    someone says it is good and always come to the same conclusion; it
    tastes like mud!

    The best thing that can happen to squirrels is being cooked :-)



    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  10. #10
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?

    James Silverton said...

    > The best thing that can happen to squirrels is being cooked :-)



    Nope. being shot and left where they lay is best.

    My ex used to put unshelled peanuts on the deck for them to eat ("they're so
    cute!") and I'd swear it became a part of their genetic makeup across
    generations to hang around looking for more!

    Best,

    Andy



  11. #11
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?



    Geoff Miller wrote:
    > Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > [Sunday dinner]
    >
    >
    >>And in the American south gumbos, Brunswick stew (boysa
    >>had all day saturday to catch the squirrels catfish
    >>(shudder), sunday pork loin.

    >
    >
    >
    > You shudder at the thought of eating catfish, but the idea
    > of eating squirrels gets a pass? Gosh, Beave, that's kinda
    > goofy.
    >
    > What's your objection to catfish? It has such a mild flavor,
    > I can't imagine why anyone would dislike it.
    >
    >
    >
    > Geoff
    >


    THe problem i have with most fish, but especially cat fish, is that it
    tastes like fish.

    Squirrel on the other hand taste like rabbit, which tastes like chicken
    albeit a slightly gamy chicken.
    --
    JL


  12. #12
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?

    James Silverton said...

    > Time to say it again! I try catfish once every year or two because
    > someone says it is good and always come to the same conclusion; it
    > tastes like mud!



    Sorry, I skipped that paragraph. Oops.

    You want mud??? Try a Geno's or Pat's Philly cheesesteak.

    WILL TRADE FOR CATFISH!!!

    Best,

    Andy

  13. #13
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?

    Joseph Littleshoes wrote:


    > Squirrel on the other hand taste like rabbit, which tastes like
    > chicken albeit a slightly gamy chicken.


    I casseroled rabbits last night, newly shot by my David! I browned them in
    olive oil, with onions and garlic. I reduced the sauce with red wine and
    cooked them slowly with tomatoes and thyme!

    Delicious!



  14. #14
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?

    "Joseph Littleshoes" wrote
    > Mike.. . . wrote:


    >> we all know that the uk has its classic dish of sunday roast, but what is
    >> the us equivilant? the burger?


    > Ignoring the typical UK.food+drink.misc sarcasm.....


    Hehe but at this season, BBQ is real common.

    > The UK is such a small place regionalism probly is not the issue it is in
    > the US.


    This sounds true to me. Not that they dont have regions, but the whole
    thing is about the size of Florida right? More regional perhaps than
    Florida but your post sorta shows it.

    > In many parts of the US the classic Sunday dinner was a chicken dinner.


    Still is. Thats when Mom has time (or Dad in today's world) to fire up the
    rotisserie or just stuff and bake one.

    > However in the North East a boiled dinner was often prepared for sundays
    > in such a way as to obviate the need for cooking on the sabbath.


    Or in my area, a huge batch of greens and corn with a dried bean pot and
    sausage or smoked ham.

    > And in the American south gumbos, Brunswick stew (boys had all day
    > saturday to catch the squirrels catfish (shudder), sunday pork loin.


    I grew up with fish on Saturday from the 'ketchin's' of the day. Brunswick
    stew variations were common for Sunday (often using chicken, possum, and
    leftover fish from Saturday).

    In fact, I'm making up a batch now for tomorrow. No possum, but I got 'nuff
    stuff to make a sort of brunswick stew in the crockpot.

    > But such 'sunday' dinners are really more a thing of the past these day,
    > just not the big deal in the US as it was even in my youth in the 1950's
    > in the pacific northwest where sunday dinner was more seasonal.


    This is true. It's shifted and now it's more apt to be a Saturday meal and
    Sunday is 'Mom's getting ready for work' regular meal.

    > A sunday ham was often started by me mum on friday or saturday to be
    > served in the afternoon on sunday. And that primarily, as i recall, cause
    > church services lasted so long the food was prepared in advance so as to
    > only need be warmed and served.


    ;-) Church services got shorter.

    Common here, happening tomorrow: Local neighbors coming over on Sunday for
    some good food and chatter. One of them had a big mess of local fish which
    Don is cleaning. We are gonna grill them whole (cleaned) with a little leek
    and rice filling.

    Another has a mess of corn in husk, frozen so not perfect but will work.
    He's gonna soak them a bit and bring them over for the grill.

    I'm mixing up a brunswick stew and a side dish of oniony-non-sweet coleslaw.

    Dunno what others bring yet. I'll find out as the day goes along or as they
    arrive tomorrow.




  15. #15
    Sky Guest

    Default NSOT: "Game" was Re: classic dish?

    Andy wrote:
    >
    > James Silverton said...
    >
    > > The best thing that can happen to squirrels is being cooked :-)

    >
    > Nope. being shot and left where they lay is best.
    >
    > My ex used to put unshelled peanuts on the deck for them to eat ("they're so
    > cute!") and I'd swear it became a part of their genetic makeup across
    > generations to hang around looking for more!
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy


    Heh, squirrels are nothing but furry-tailed tree rats! And pests at
    that! Sure they're cute, but not when they decide an attic is an ideal
    abode and nursery! Now if only I could use .22 shot shells to take care
    of the critters, but there's some sort of city code or rule that says
    "no can do." Not sure that I'd want to dress, cook, and eat squirrel
    however. If circumstances were such that food was very scarce, I'm sure
    I'd change my mind.

    Sky, ever the carnivore

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  16. #16
    Veronique Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?

    On May 30, 11:54 am, Joseph Littleshoes <jpsti...@isp.com> wrote:
    > Geoff Miller wrote:
    > > Joseph Littleshoes <jpsti...@isp.com> writes:

    >
    > > [Sunday dinner]

    >
    > >>And in the American south gumbos, Brunswick stew (boysa
    > >>had all day saturday to catch the squirrels catfish
    > >>(shudder), sunday pork loin.

    >
    > > You shudder at the thought of eating catfish, but the idea
    > > of eating squirrels gets a pass? Gosh, Beave, that's kinda
    > > goofy.

    >
    > > What's your objection to catfish? It has such a mild flavor,
    > > I can't imagine why anyone would dislike it.

    >
    > > Geoff

    >
    > THe problem i have with most fish, but especially cat fish, is that it
    > tastes like fish.
    >
    > Squirrel on the other hand taste like rabbit, which tastes like chicken
    > albeit a slightly gamy chicken.



    I thought squirrel tastes like rabbit which tastes like rattlesnake
    which tastes like chicken.


    V.
    --
    Veronique Chez Sheep

  17. #17
    Damsel Guest

    Default Re: NSOT: "Game" was Re: classic dish?

    On Sat, 30 May 2009 14:27:38 -0500, Sky <skyhooks@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAt[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Heh, squirrels are nothing but furry-tailed tree rats! And pests at
    >that! Sure they're cute, but not when they decide an attic is an ideal
    >abode and nursery! Now if only I could use .22 shot shells to take care
    >of the critters, but there's some sort of city code or rule that says
    >"no can do." Not sure that I'd want to dress, cook, and eat squirrel
    >however. If circumstances were such that food was very scarce, I'm sure
    >I'd change my mind.
    >
    >Sky, ever the carnivore


    Maybe you could cure and cold-smoke it, and call it squircon. Or
    bacrrel.

    Carol, trying to be helpful

    --
    Change "invalid" to James Bond's agent number to reply.

  18. #18
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?


    "Mike.. . ." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1j3rb1em8r0zg$.1e2kozj3sl3ht$.[email protected] ..
    > we all know that the uk has its classic dish of sunday roast, but what is
    > the us equivilant? the burger?
    >
    > --
    > Mike... . . . .
    > remove clothing to email


    Depends on the ethnicity and the part of the country.

    South Southern Fried Chicken
    Northeast New England Boiled Dinner
    Southwest Enchiladas
    Texas BBQ
    Mid Atlantic Pulled Pork
    Chicago Baby Back Rib or Deep dish pizza
    NYC Go out for Deli
    Pacific Northwest Salmon
    Miami Early Bird Special
    California Grilled anything

    Dimitri



  19. #19
    =?iso-8859-1?B?VEZNrg==?= Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?



    "Geoff Miller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    >
    > Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > [Sunday dinner]
    >
    >> And in the American south gumbos, Brunswick stew (boysa
    >> had all day saturday to catch the squirrels catfish
    >> (shudder), sunday pork loin.

    >
    >
    > You shudder at the thought of eating catfish, but the idea
    > of eating squirrels gets a pass? Gosh, Beave, that's kinda
    > goofy.
    >
    > What's your objection to catfish? It has such a mild flavor,
    > I can't imagine why anyone would dislike it.



    I love catfish personally, but Christy always said it tasted like dirt. She
    did enjoy my homemade catfish a couple of times, but she couldn't stomach
    restaurant fare.

    TFM®


  20. #20
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: classic dish?

    On May 30, 11:47*am, "Mike.. . ." <i.willexpose.mys...@the.fells>
    wrote:
    > we all know that the uk has its classic dish of sunday roast, but what is
    > the us equivilant? the burger?


    It's not really equivalent, but the traditional Thanksgiving feast is
    one of the best things the USA has to offer.
    Turkey, stuffed with sage-onion stuffing
    Gravy, gizzards and hearts, OK, but feed the liver to the cat
    Corn
    Mashed potatoes
    Cranberry sauce
    Perhaps green beans--but not in a matrix of condensed soup and topped
    off with canned onion horror.


    I just bought some classic dishes. I got a few old Corning Ware items
    on eBay.
    >
    > --
    > Mike


    --Bryan


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