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Thread: Clarified Butter for Cooking

  1. #1
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Clarified Butter for Cooking


    The topic was given a good going over only recently, but there was
    so much conflicting information it only got more confusing. My
    question is this: Can clarified butter be made in the microwave?

    I sometimes put a tablespoon of butter in a tiny dish in the
    microwave to use on popcorn. I have noticed there is white stuff
    floating on top, a small amount of course, because I only use a
    tablespoon. But when people talking about skimming the milk solids
    from the top of a pound of clarified butter, is that the stuff they're
    talking about?

    I know a guy here in town who says he's been clarifying butter
    for years and that cooking it down is not necessary - just heating it
    till it's totally melted to liquid is good enough. I would also like
    to know if it's easier to skim off the milk solids or whatever they're
    called after the butter is allowed to sit awhile. It seems while the
    butter is hot that the stuff on top is harder to skim off, if in fact
    it's the right stuff. I only want to use the clarified butter for
    cooking. Thanks.

    TJ


  2. #2
    Chemo Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sep 7, 3:33*pm, Tommy Joe <j...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    > * * The topic was given a good going over only recently, but there was
    > so much conflicting information it only got more confusing. *My
    > question is this: *Can clarified butter be made in the microwave?
    >
    > * * *I sometimes put a tablespoon of butter in a tiny dish in the
    > microwave to use on popcorn. *I have noticed there is white stuff
    > floating on top, a small amount of course, because I only use a
    > tablespoon. *But when people talking about skimming the milk solids
    > from the top of a pound of clarified butter, is that the stuff they're
    > talking about?
    >
    > * * *I know a guy here in town who says he's been clarifying butter
    > for years and that cooking it down is not necessary - just heating it
    > till it's totally melted to liquid is good enough. *I would also like
    > to know if it's easier to skim off the milk solids or whatever they're
    > called after the butter is allowed to sit awhile. *It seems while the
    > butter is hot that the stuff on top is harder to skim off, if in fact
    > it's the right stuff. * I only want to use the clarified butter for
    > cooking. *Thanks.
    >
    > TJ


    Here: I googled it for you. http://alterecipes.com/06-etc/clarif...ify-butter.htm

  3. #3
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Fri, 7 Sep 2012 15:33:58 -0700 (PDT), Tommy Joe
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > The topic was given a good going over only recently, but there was
    >so much conflicting information it only got more confusing. My
    >question is this: Can clarified butter be made in the microwave?
    >
    > I sometimes put a tablespoon of butter in a tiny dish in the
    >microwave to use on popcorn. I have noticed there is white stuff
    >floating on top, a small amount of course, because I only use a
    >tablespoon. But when people talking about skimming the milk solids
    >from the top of a pound of clarified butter, is that the stuff they're
    >talking about?
    >
    > I know a guy here in town who says he's been clarifying butter
    >for years and that cooking it down is not necessary - just heating it
    >till it's totally melted to liquid is good enough. I would also like
    >to know if it's easier to skim off the milk solids or whatever they're
    >called after the butter is allowed to sit awhile. It seems while the
    >butter is hot that the stuff on top is harder to skim off, if in fact
    >it's the right stuff. I only want to use the clarified butter for
    >cooking. Thanks.


    The foam on top bubbles forms from teh water evaporating an dsome
    schmutz that floats... should be skimmed off. The milk solids sink to
    the bottom... the clarified butter is carefully poured off.

    Your friend is correct, to clarify butter melt at medium heat just
    until the milk solids sink to the bottom... cooking longer until the
    milk solids begin to brown is how ghee is made. Ghee wouldn't make
    popcorn or dipping seafood taste very good, ghee doesn't have that
    fresh butter flavor, ghee is used as a cooking oil, for Indian cooking
    often it's flavored with spices... you may like curried popcorn.

    How much popcorn do you make that one tablespoon of butter is
    sufficient, do you count out like twenty five kernals? For popcorn
    it's not necessary to skim or separate the milk solids, you won't
    notice on popcorn.... for dipping seafood you'll see all the schmutz
    and it won't look very attractive.

  4. #4
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On 9/7/2012 12:33 PM, Tommy Joe wrote:
    >
    > The topic was given a good going over only recently, but there was
    > so much conflicting information it only got more confusing. My
    > question is this: Can clarified butter be made in the microwave?
    >
    > I sometimes put a tablespoon of butter in a tiny dish in the
    > microwave to use on popcorn. I have noticed there is white stuff
    > floating on top, a small amount of course, because I only use a
    > tablespoon. But when people talking about skimming the milk solids
    > from the top of a pound of clarified butter, is that the stuff they're
    > talking about?
    >
    > I know a guy here in town who says he's been clarifying butter
    > for years and that cooking it down is not necessary - just heating it
    > till it's totally melted to liquid is good enough. I would also like
    > to know if it's easier to skim off the milk solids or whatever they're
    > called after the butter is allowed to sit awhile. It seems while the
    > butter is hot that the stuff on top is harder to skim off, if in fact
    > it's the right stuff. I only want to use the clarified butter for
    > cooking. Thanks.
    >
    > TJ
    >


    The milk solids are on the bottom. The stuff on the top is butter
    scum/slag. My guess is that it's water mixed with milk solids and air.
    It's some pretty nasty stuff but how bad could it be?

    Clarified butter is the stuff in the middle. Popcorn popped with
    clarified butter seems like a good idea although I've never heard of
    anybody doing it.




  5. #5
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sep 7, 7:00*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > On Fri, 7 Sep 2012 15:33:58 -0700 (PDT), Tommy Joe
    >
    >
    >
    > <j...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    >
    > > * *The topic was given a good going over only recently, but there was
    > >so much conflicting information it only got more confusing. *My
    > >question is this: *Can clarified butter be made in the microwave?

    >
    > > * * I sometimes put a tablespoon of butter in a tiny dish in the
    > >microwave to use on popcorn. *I have noticed there is white stuff
    > >floating on top, a small amount of course, because I only use a
    > >tablespoon. *But when people talking about skimming the milk solids
    > >from the top of a pound of clarified butter, is that the stuff they're
    > >talking about?

    >
    > > * * I know a guy here in town who says he's been clarifying butter
    > >for years and that cooking it down is not necessary - just heating it
    > >till it's totally melted to liquid is good enough. *I would also like
    > >to know if it's easier to skim off the milk solids or whatever they're
    > >called after the butter is allowed to sit awhile. *It seems while the
    > >butter is hot that the stuff on top is harder to skim off, if in fact
    > >it's the right stuff. * I only want to use the clarified butter for
    > >cooking. *Thanks.

    >
    > The foam on top bubbles forms from teh water evaporating an dsome
    > schmutz that floats... should be skimmed off. *The milk solids sink to
    > the bottom... the clarified butter is carefully poured off.
    >
    > Your friend is correct, to clarify butter melt at medium heat just
    > until the milk solids sink to the bottom... cooking longer until the
    > milk solids begin to brown is how ghee is made. *Ghee wouldn't make
    > popcorn or dipping seafood taste very good, ghee doesn't have that
    > fresh butter flavor, ghee is used as a cooking oil, for Indian cooking
    > often it's flavored with spices... you may like curried popcorn.
    >
    > How much popcorn do you make that one tablespoon of butter is
    > sufficient, do you count out like twenty five kernals? *For popcorn
    > it's not necessary to skim or separate the milk solids, you won't
    > notice on popcorn.... for dipping seafood you'll see all the schmutz
    > and it won't look very attractive.



    I was not trying to make clarified butter for popcorn, only using
    the microwaved butter as an example of what I wondered clarified
    butter should look like, although my grandmother used it all the time
    I never bothered to inspect it or write a dissertation on it. I still
    don't understand it. Does the butter have to be cooled. I know the
    stuff that rises to the top, a froth of sorts. I never skimmed it off
    for the popcorn, I merely mentioned it wondering if that is the stuff
    that should be skimmed off for clarified butter. Yeah, I don't care
    about ghee or flavorings, I just thought it would be nice to have the
    clarified butter around for browning some things, certain dishes. As
    for my popcorn making, I use those single-serving bags that have as
    little oil or fat in them as I can find. I micro the bag, then micro
    the butter - unzip the bag and pour into a bowl and then drizzle with
    the butter. I still don't get it about the clarified butter. The
    stuff on top is to be skimmed off, the stuff on the bottom sort of
    remains on the bottom, and what's in the middle is the clarified stuff
    - right? Well, how long does one wait to pour out the butter after
    it's melted to insure that the unwanted stuff stays on the bottom and
    does not come out with the clarified stuff? See how confusing this
    is, one answer forcing another question, round and round we go and
    where we're going to stop nobody knows.

    Can you clarify that? Seriously.
    TJ

  6. #6
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sep 7, 8:17*pm, dsi1 <d...@eternal-september.invalid> wrote:

    > The milk solids are on the bottom. The stuff on the top is butter
    > scum/slag. My guess is that it's water mixed with milk solids and air.
    > It's some pretty nasty stuff but how bad could it be?
    >
    > Clarified butter is the stuff in the middle. Popcorn popped with
    > clarified butter seems like a good idea although I've never heard of
    > anybody doing it.



    Thanks for your post too. I thought from the start that the stuff
    on the bottom was to be thrown away. My main question is, having
    melted butter before and never having seen anything different on the
    bottom, does it require some cooling time before pouring off the
    clarified stuff? I know this is a simple procedure, but it seems
    complicated using words to demonstrate it. Yeah, I figured the stuff
    on top was air and whatever else. Anyway, is there a waiting period
    after the butter is melted before pouring the clarified stuff into a
    jar and leaving the unwanted stuff on the bottom of the pan, or dish
    if melted in the microwave. I was not looking to use clarified butter
    on popcorn, only using it as an example to try and describe what I
    thought was the stuff that had to be removed, a sort of white, airy
    froth that sits atop the melted butter. I have never seen anything
    different on the bottom side which leads me to believe it should sit
    awhile before pouring, am I correct?

    Thanks again,
    TJ

  7. #7
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On 9/7/2012 8:37 PM, Tommy Joe wrote:
    > On Sep 7, 8:17 pm, dsi1 <d...@eternal-september.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> The milk solids are on the bottom. The stuff on the top is butter
    >> scum/slag. My guess is that it's water mixed with milk solids and air.
    >> It's some pretty nasty stuff but how bad could it be?
    >>
    >> Clarified butter is the stuff in the middle. Popcorn popped with
    >> clarified butter seems like a good idea although I've never heard of
    >> anybody doing it.

    >
    >
    > Thanks for your post too. I thought from the start that the stuff
    > on the bottom was to be thrown away. My main question is, having
    > melted butter before and never having seen anything different on the
    > bottom, does it require some cooling time before pouring off the
    > clarified stuff? I know this is a simple procedure, but it seems
    > complicated using words to demonstrate it. Yeah, I figured the stuff
    > on top was air and whatever else. Anyway, is there a waiting period
    > after the butter is melted before pouring the clarified stuff into a
    > jar and leaving the unwanted stuff on the bottom of the pan, or dish
    > if melted in the microwave. I was not looking to use clarified butter
    > on popcorn, only using it as an example to try and describe what I
    > thought was the stuff that had to be removed, a sort of white, airy
    > froth that sits atop the melted butter. I have never seen anything
    > different on the bottom side which leads me to believe it should sit
    > awhile before pouring, am I correct?
    >
    > Thanks again,
    > TJ
    >


    Remove the froth and then pour out the clear liquid. I don't think you
    need to wait for the butter to settle. I'm not sure what you can do with
    the surplus milk solids - my guess is that you could dump it on some
    popcorn and it would be fine.

  8. #8
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sep 8, 5:40*am, dsi1 <d...@eternal-september.invalid> wrote:

    > Remove the froth and then pour out the clear liquid. I don't think you
    > need to wait for the butter to settle. I'm not sure what you can do with
    > the surplus milk solids - my guess is that you could dump it on some
    > popcorn and it would be fine.



    I'd just throw it away. I read somewhere that in clarifying
    butter approximately 1/4 of what one starts with is lost. Big deal, I
    can live with that. I still don't quite get it though, the stuff on
    the bottom I mean. I've never seen it. I've melted butter before,
    never a whole pound, but a few tablespoons, maybe as much as 4 of
    them, and I saw the froth on top, but I never noticed anything forming
    on the bottom. So it's hard for me to visualize it. A pound of
    unsalted butter from the local market is only about $3, so maybe I'll
    just wing it and see what happens. So what I'm imagining is that when
    I pour the usable butter into a jar or whatever there is some small
    amount of something that clings to the pot or container I'm using, so
    the butter should be poured off gently so as not to include the bottom
    stuff, whatever the hell that is. At least the experiment will give
    me something to do. Thanks again.

    Please not there are no question marks in my paragraph above, but if
    you suddenly feel you have something new and simple to add to the
    equation, by all means feel free. Otherwise, your info has been
    helpful and I appreciate it.

    TJ

  9. #9
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sat, 8 Sep 2012 13:05:38 -0700 (PDT), Tommy Joe
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sep 8, 5:40*am, dsi1 <d...@eternal-september.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> Remove the froth and then pour out the clear liquid. I don't think you
    >> need to wait for the butter to settle. I'm not sure what you can do with
    >> the surplus milk solids - my guess is that you could dump it on some
    >> popcorn and it would be fine.

    >
    >
    > I'd just throw it away. I read somewhere that in clarifying
    >butter approximately 1/4 of what one starts with is lost. Big deal, I
    >can live with that. I still don't quite get it though, the stuff on
    >the bottom I mean. I've never seen it. I've melted butter before,
    >never a whole pound, but a few tablespoons, maybe as much as 4 of
    >them, and I saw the froth on top, but I never noticed anything forming
    >on the bottom. So it's hard for me to visualize it. A pound of
    >unsalted butter from the local market is only about $3, so maybe I'll
    >just wing it and see what happens. So what I'm imagining is that when
    >I pour the usable butter into a jar or whatever there is some small
    >amount of something that clings to the pot or container I'm using, so
    >the butter should be poured off gently so as not to include the bottom
    >stuff, whatever the hell that is. At least the experiment will give
    >me something to do.


    You can use the dregs for a lubricant, for when you have nothing to
    do. hehe

  10. #10
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On 9/8/12 4:05 PM, Tommy Joe wrote:
    >.... I saw the froth on top, but I never noticed anything forming
    > on the bottom. So it's hard for me to visualize it.


    Just keep the butter over low heat a bit longer, maybe 10 minutes, and
    you will definitely see it. It will look like dark brown grainy bits
    suspended in an opaque creamy (almost milk) colored goop.

    Then, after skimming off any lingering foam, you just pour off the clear
    clarified butter and leave the obvious garbage behind.

    -- Larry


  11. #11
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sep 8, 4:46*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > You can use the dregs for a lubricant, for when you have nothing to
    > do. *hehe



    During my times I used almost anything to achieve the desired
    effect, but those days are gone as my sausage has turned to hamburger
    meat.

    The days of Wine and Lubricants
    Laughed and ran away
    Through a meadowland toward a closing door
    The door has closed, I can't hear them laughing anymore

    TJ

  12. #12
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sep 8, 5:13*pm, pltrgyst <pltrg...@xhost.org> wrote:

    > Just keep the butter over low heat a bit longer, maybe 10 minutes, and
    > you will definitely see it. It will look like dark brown grainy bits
    > suspended in an opaque creamy (almost milk) colored goop.
    >
    > Then, after skimming off any lingering foam, you just pour off the clear
    > clarified butter and leave the obvious garbage behind.



    No disrespect to others on this, but your description was the
    easiest for me to understand, very well described, and makes me feel
    more confident about what to look for and expect. Thanks to all who
    have answered on this. For a long time I rarely used butter, only for
    a few select dishes that either call for them or do better with them.
    I remember my grandmother using butter for those dishes. A simple
    string bean and chunked meat stew was one I loved and have made myself
    many times with decent results. But her beans always came out darker
    and softer, almost brownish, and I think it was the clarified butter
    that made the difference. I will find out as I intend to make the
    bean and meat dish my first effort with clarified butter. Thanks
    again. Simmer 10 minutes, no more, got it.

    TJ

  13. #13
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    Tommy Joe wrote:
    >
    > The topic was given a good going over only recently, but there was
    > so much conflicting information it only got more confusing. My
    > question is this: Can clarified butter be made in the microwave?


    I'm sure it could be but maybe better to make it in a very small saucepan so
    you can watch the process like a hawk and not take it too far. I would also
    tip the saucepan while heating to keep the bottom residue confined to a
    small pile.

    G.

  14. #14
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sep 9, 5:41*am, Gary <g.maj...@att.net> wrote:



    > I'm sure it could be but maybe better to make it in a very small saucepanso
    > you can watch the process like a hawk and not take it too far. *I wouldalso
    > tip the saucepan while heating to keep the bottom residue confined to a
    > small pile.



    Like impatient people do when they're making an omelet? Thank
    you for your advice too. I figure what the hell, I can make a pound
    of the stuff and keep it in a jar, even if it goes wrong it's not the
    end of the world. When is the world going to end anyway?

    TJ

  15. #15
    Chemo Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sep 8, 9:16*pm, Tommy Joe <j...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    > On Sep 8, 4:46*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    > > You can use the dregs for a lubricant, for when you have nothing to
    > > do. *hehe

    >
    > * * During my times I used almost anything to achieve the desired
    > effect, but those days are gone as my sausage has turned to hamburger
    > meat.
    >
    > The days of Wine and Lubricants
    > Laughed and ran away
    > Through a meadowland toward a closing door
    > The door has closed, I can't hear them laughing anymore
    >
    > TJ


    Hell, I'm in my 60's and we do it a lot!

  16. #16
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sep 10, 1:19*pm, Chemo <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    On Sep 8, 9:16*pm, Tommy Joe <j...@bellsouth.net> wrote:

    > > The days of Wine and Lubricants
    > > Laughed and ran away
    > > Through a meadowland toward a closing door
    > > The door has closed, I can't hear them laughing anymore




    > Hell, I'm in my 60's and we do it a lot!




    Are you trying to make me feel bad? Question number two: Did you
    smoke 3 to 5 packs of cigarets and 12 cans of beer per day as a
    regular routine? I think it has something to do with the arteries.
    If mine are screwed up I am not pleased, but to even be alive to talk
    about the condition of my arteries is a positive step. I wish I could
    do it, but I'm glad I don't HAVE to.

    TJ

  17. #17
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    Tommy Joe wrote:
    >Chemo <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >Tommy Joe <j...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    >
    >> > The days of Wine and Lubricants
    >> > Laughed and ran away
    >> > Through a meadowland toward a closing door
    >> > The door has closed, I can't hear them laughing anymore

    >>
    >> Hell, I'm in my 60's and we do it a lot!

    >
    > Are you trying to make me feel bad?


    They're doing *it* linguistically. LOL

  18. #18
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Clarified Butter for Cooking

    On Sep 11, 11:18*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > They're doing *it* linguistically. LOL



    You mean 'cunnalingustically', right?

    TJ

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