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Thread: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

  1. #1
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    Per the NY Times:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/dining/14curious.html

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro

    --

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines


    To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"

  2. #2
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    And then there's the cilantro posters haters. You are not alone in
    your postings.

    -sw

  3. #3
    Damaeus Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    In news:rec.food.cooking, Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]>
    posted on Tue, 13 Apr 2010 22:10:02 -0700 the following:

    > Per the NY Times:
    >
    > http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/dining/14curious.html
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro


    I love fresh cilantro, and lots of it. When I first got some years ago, I
    noticed that it smelled like a musty dishrag, or like that strange smell I
    encounter at Six Flags over Texas around many of their waterways. I
    suppose it may have been a combination of stagnant water, mildew and hot
    asphalt. Anyway, of the three smells, naturally cilantro smells the
    cleanest. It just reminds me of the other two smells.

    If I want to make little "soft tacos" out of steamed corn tortillas, I'll
    put the hamburger meat (cooked with cilantro, chili powder, cumin, crushed
    red pepper and salt) into the tortilla along with some chopped cilantro
    and diced tomato. Excellent flavor in my opinion.

    And I can't make salsa, pico de gallo, or avacado dip without including
    cilantro.

    Damaeus
    --
    "Marihuana influences Negroes to look at white people in the eye, step on
    white men's shadows and look at a white woman twice."
    -William Randolph Hearst

  4. #4
    Food Snob® Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    On Apr 14, 12:10*am, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@spambot.com> wrote:
    > Per the NY Times:
    >
    > http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/dining/14curious.html
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro
    >

    I note that the site says, "Cilantro itself can be reshaped to make it
    easier to take. A Japanese study published in January suggested that
    crushing the leaves will give leaf enzymes the chance to gradually
    convert the aldehydes into other substances with no aroma." I've
    often felt that the chopped leaves are OK, though I think they
    distract from other, more desirable flavors. The stems, however, are
    just garbage, and should always be discarded.

    --Bryan

  5. #5
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > Per the NY Times:
    >
    > http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/dining/14curious.html
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro
    >



    I had the same experience as Dr. Gottfried. Cilantro used
    to taste very soapy to me until I began to eat more of it
    in Mexican food. Now I enjoy its flavor in various dishes.

    gloria p

  6. #6
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:

    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro
    >

    And you, young lady, will be beaten with a wet noodle for admitting
    it ;-)

    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy - who *loves* cilantro (especially with dishes than contain
    pork)

  7. #7
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    On Wed 14 Apr 2010 09:29:06a, gloria.p told us...

    > Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >> Per the NY Times:
    >>
    >> http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/dining/14curious.html
    >>
    >> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro
    >>

    >
    >
    > I had the same experience as Dr. Gottfried. Cilantro used
    > to taste very soapy to me until I began to eat more of it
    > in Mexican food. Now I enjoy its flavor in various dishes.
    >
    > gloria p


    My first experience with cilantro was shortly after it appeared in
    supermarkets in the Cleveland area. It was displayed right next to the
    parsley. One night I was hurriedly shopping and picked up several bunches
    of "parsley" to use in tabouli later that evening. I put the "parsley"
    through several washes of clear water and then into the salad spinner to
    dry it. It was when I opened the spinner that I noticed the smell. I
    tasted a small amount and declared the "parsley" spoiled, immediately
    stuffing it down the garbage disposer. :-)

    I have since learned to love it for many uses.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  8. #8
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Wed 14 Apr 2010 09:29:06a, gloria.p told us...
    >
    >> Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >>> Per the NY Times:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/dining/14curious.html
    >>>
    >>> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro
    >>>

    >>
    >> I had the same experience as Dr. Gottfried. Cilantro used
    >> to taste very soapy to me until I began to eat more of it
    >> in Mexican food. Now I enjoy its flavor in various dishes.
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > My first experience with cilantro was shortly after it appeared in
    > supermarkets in the Cleveland area. It was displayed right next to the
    > parsley. One night I was hurriedly shopping and picked up several bunches
    > of "parsley" to use in tabouli later that evening. I put the "parsley"
    > through several washes of clear water and then into the salad spinner to
    > dry it. It was when I opened the spinner that I noticed the smell. I
    > tasted a small amount and declared the "parsley" spoiled, immediately
    > stuffing it down the garbage disposer. :-)
    >
    > I have since learned to love it for many uses.
    >

    That harsh introduction sounds like it was a bit much. Ugh. Like
    others, I at first detested it but now enjoy some in various
    contexts. Still, I am not going to use it by the bunch as some of
    my Thai cookbooks advocate.

    --
    Jean B.

  9. #9
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    On Wed 14 Apr 2010 12:29:59p, Jean B. told us...

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Wed 14 Apr 2010 09:29:06a, gloria.p told us...
    >>
    >>> Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >>>> Per the NY Times:
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/dining/14curious.html
    >>>>
    >>>> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I had the same experience as Dr. Gottfried. Cilantro used
    >>> to taste very soapy to me until I began to eat more of it
    >>> in Mexican food. Now I enjoy its flavor in various dishes.
    >>>
    >>> gloria p

    >>
    >> My first experience with cilantro was shortly after it appeared in
    >> supermarkets in the Cleveland area. It was displayed right next to the
    >> parsley. One night I was hurriedly shopping and picked up several
    >> bunches of "parsley" to use in tabouli later that evening. I put the
    >> "parsley" through several washes of clear water and then into the salad
    >> spinner to dry it. It was when I opened the spinner that I noticed the
    >> smell. I tasted a small amount and declared the "parsley" spoiled,
    >> immediately stuffing it down the garbage disposer. :-)
    >>
    >> I have since learned to love it for many uses.
    >>

    > That harsh introduction sounds like it was a bit much. Ugh. Like
    > others, I at first detested it but now enjoy some in various
    > contexts. Still, I am not going to use it by the bunch as some of
    > my Thai cookbooks advocate.
    >


    I really like it now. I could probably handle bunches of it in certain
    dishes. In the case of my mistaking it for parsley, I think it was the
    surprise factor that really got me. :-)

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  10. #10
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Wed 14 Apr 2010 12:29:59p, Jean B. told us...
    >
    >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>> On Wed 14 Apr 2010 09:29:06a, gloria.p told us...
    >>>
    >>>> Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >>>>> Per the NY Times:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/dining/14curious.html
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro
    >>>>>
    >>>> I had the same experience as Dr. Gottfried. Cilantro used
    >>>> to taste very soapy to me until I began to eat more of it
    >>>> in Mexican food. Now I enjoy its flavor in various dishes.
    >>>>
    >>>> gloria p
    >>> My first experience with cilantro was shortly after it appeared in
    >>> supermarkets in the Cleveland area. It was displayed right next to the
    >>> parsley. One night I was hurriedly shopping and picked up several
    >>> bunches of "parsley" to use in tabouli later that evening. I put the
    >>> "parsley" through several washes of clear water and then into the salad
    >>> spinner to dry it. It was when I opened the spinner that I noticed the
    >>> smell. I tasted a small amount and declared the "parsley" spoiled,
    >>> immediately stuffing it down the garbage disposer. :-)
    >>>
    >>> I have since learned to love it for many uses.
    >>>

    >> That harsh introduction sounds like it was a bit much. Ugh. Like
    >> others, I at first detested it but now enjoy some in various
    >> contexts. Still, I am not going to use it by the bunch as some of
    >> my Thai cookbooks advocate.
    >>

    >
    > I really like it now. I could probably handle bunches of it in certain
    > dishes. In the case of my mistaking it for parsley, I think it was the
    > surprise factor that really got me. :-)
    >

    I am surprised that you ever ate it again! I don't remember when
    I first encountered cilantro, but it sure wasn't love at first bite.

    --
    Jean B.

  11. #11
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 18:46:32 +0200, ChattyCathy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro
    >>

    >And you, young lady, will be beaten with a wet noodle for admitting
    >it ;-)


    What's funny about my loathing of cilantro is that I was born 9 blocks
    from the Mexican border in Arizona to a Mexican food loving bunch of
    Anglos. I don't recall having cilantro foisted on me as a small girl,
    but I do recall my mother joking that they must have switched the
    babies in the hospital b/c I'm the only one in the family who can't
    stand it.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines


    To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"

  12. #12
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 01:13:19 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >And then there's the cilantro posters haters. You are not alone in
    >your postings.


    One of the drawbacks of living on the Left Coast. Always 3 hours
    behind, and I've never had a tinfoil hat, either!

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines


    To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"

  13. #13
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    On Apr 14, 9:44*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@spambot.com> wrote:
    > On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 01:13:19 -0500, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >And then there's the cilantro posters haters. *You are not alone in
    > >your postings.

    >
    > One of the drawbacks of living on the Left Coast. Always 3 hours
    > behind, and I've never had a tinfoil hat, either!
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >
    > --
    >
    > "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    > if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    > and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    > it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines
    >
    > To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"


    Squeeks, you don't have to left to be late. Some of us just can't be
    here all the time.

    My first cilantro was in grad school in Chicago. Another student was
    from TX. His family raised goats. He hosted a goat roast. Oh my
    god, what is that flavor? It is the best thing I've ever tasted!
    Really. Like being able to see a new color.

    When I grow it or can get it fresh, it goes into almost as much stuff
    as garlic (and do those guys get along!).

    I feel sorry for the soap people in the same way that I feel sorry for
    the colorblind: I wish you could share my pleasure.

    bulka

  14. #14
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:

    >
    > What's funny about my loathing of cilantro is that I was born 9 blocks
    > from the Mexican border in Arizona to a Mexican food loving bunch of
    > Anglos. I don't recall having cilantro foisted on me as a small girl,
    > but I do recall my mother joking that they must have switched the
    > babies in the hospital b/c I'm the only one in the family who can't
    > stand it.


    Heh, the "experts" might say it has something to do with your taste buds
    or whatever, but the reasons really don't matter, do they? Thing is, if
    you don't like it, you don't like it. I absolutely hate cabbage
    <blech>, and yet billions of other people like or even love it...
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

  15. #15
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 18:46:32 +0200, ChattyCathy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >>
    >>> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro
    >>>

    >> And you, young lady, will be beaten with a wet noodle for admitting
    >> it ;-)

    >
    > What's funny about my loathing of cilantro is that I was born 9 blocks
    > from the Mexican border in Arizona to a Mexican food loving bunch of
    > Anglos. I don't recall having cilantro foisted on me as a small girl,
    > but I do recall my mother joking that they must have switched the
    > babies in the hospital b/c I'm the only one in the family who can't
    > stand it.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >

    Isn't that dislike at least frequently genetic? I do suppose, as
    with other things, some just dislike it on a nongenetic basis. I
    can see that its rather ?pungent? taste would be easy to dislike.

    --
    Jean B.

  16. #16
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    ChattyCathy wrote on Thu, 15 Apr 2010 08:04:40 +0200:

    >> What's funny about my loathing of cilantro is that I was born
    >> 9 blocks from the Mexican border in Arizona to a Mexican food
    >> loving bunch of Anglos. I don't recall having cilantro
    >> foisted on me as a small girl, but I do recall my mother
    >> joking that they must have switched the babies in the
    >> hospital b/c I'm the only one in the family who can't stand
    >> it.


    >Thing is, if you don't like it, you don't like it. I absolutely hate
    >cabbage

    <blech>, and yet billions of other people like or even love it...

    I can't say I "love" cabbage and I used to actively dislike it. However,
    that was the result of a British childhood when it was served cooked to
    death. I later found that lightly cooked cabbage was rather good and
    uncooked shredded cabbage had lots of uses. Lightly cooked oriental
    cabbages like Bok Choy also taste good to me,


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  17. #17
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    On 4/15/2010 7:56 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    > ChattyCathy wrote on Thu, 15 Apr 2010 08:04:40 +0200:
    >
    >>> What's funny about my loathing of cilantro is that I was born
    >>> 9 blocks from the Mexican border in Arizona to a Mexican food
    >>> loving bunch of Anglos. I don't recall having cilantro
    >>> foisted on me as a small girl, but I do recall my mother
    >>> joking that they must have switched the babies in the
    >>> hospital b/c I'm the only one in the family who can't stand
    >>> it.

    >
    >> Thing is, if you don't like it, you don't like it. I absolutely hate
    >> cabbage

    > <blech>, and yet billions of other people like or even love it...
    >
    > I can't say I "love" cabbage and I used to actively dislike it. However,
    > that was the result of a British childhood when it was served cooked to
    > death. I later found that lightly cooked cabbage was rather good and
    > uncooked shredded cabbage had lots of uses. Lightly cooked oriental
    > cabbages like Bok Choy also taste good to me,
    >
    >

    I have to agree with your assessment. My mother boiled cabbage until it
    fell completely apart. My lovely wife introduced me to lightly steamed
    cabbage with a dab of butter and freshly ground black pepper, I love the
    stuff now.

    Never ate broccoli or asparagus until I married the Yankee woman, folks
    in SE Texas back in the day just didn't eat them there strange foods.
    Now I love nearly all vegetables but still don't much care for Brussels
    sprouts but will eat them if properly prepared.

    I'm probably the only Southerner who doesn't eat crowder peas, just
    don't care for the flavor. Love black eyed peas and lady peas, just
    don't like brown crowders.

  18. #18
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    George wrote on Thu, 15 Apr 2010 08:07:30 -0500:

    > On 4/15/2010 7:56 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    >> ChattyCathy wrote on Thu, 15 Apr 2010 08:04:40 +0200:
    >>
    >>>> What's funny about my loathing of cilantro is that I was
    >>>> born 9 blocks from the Mexican border in Arizona to a
    >>>> Mexican food loving bunch of Anglos. I don't recall having cilantro
    >>>> foisted on me as a small girl, but I do recall my mother joking
    >>>> that they must have switched the babies in
    >>>> the hospital b/c I'm the only one in the family who can't
    >>>> stand it.

    >>
    >>> Thing is, if you don't like it, you don't like it. I
    >>> absolutely hate cabbage

    >> <blech>, and yet billions of other people like or even love
    >> it...
    >>
    >> I can't say I "love" cabbage and I used to actively dislike
    >> it. However, that was the result of a British childhood when it was
    >> served cooked to death. I later found that lightly
    >> cooked cabbage was rather good and uncooked shredded cabbage had lots
    >> of uses. Lightly cooked oriental cabbages like Bok
    >> Choy also taste good to me,
    >>

    > I have to agree with your assessment. My mother boiled cabbage
    > until it fell completely apart. My lovely wife introduced me
    > to lightly steamed cabbage with a dab of butter and freshly
    > ground black pepper, I love the stuff now.


    > Never ate broccoli or asparagus until I married the Yankee
    > woman, folks in SE Texas back in the day just didn't eat them there
    > strange foods. Now I love nearly all vegetables but
    > still don't much care for Brussels sprouts but will eat them
    > if properly prepared.


    Brussels Sprouts were cooked to death like cabbage when I was a kid but
    I really rather like them when cooked for just a few minutes and served
    with marjoram and a little butter flavor. Broccoli is something I've
    never had any enthusiasm for cooked or uncooked even tho' the *stems*
    are tolerable. Even with Chinese and Mexican food I find myself pushing
    the broccoli to the edge of my plate. I don't mind cooked broccoli
    served cold with a French dressing (Hungarian style I believe). It's
    good with Beef or Chicken Paprika
    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  19. #19
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    On 4/15/2010 9:43 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    > George wrote on Thu, 15 Apr 2010 08:07:30 -0500:
    >
    >> On 4/15/2010 7:56 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    >>> ChattyCathy wrote on Thu, 15 Apr 2010 08:04:40 +0200:
    >>>
    >>>>> What's funny about my loathing of cilantro is that I was
    >>>>> born 9 blocks from the Mexican border in Arizona to a
    >>>>> Mexican food loving bunch of Anglos. I don't recall having cilantro
    >>>>> foisted on me as a small girl, but I do recall my mother joking
    >>>>> that they must have switched the babies in
    >>>>> the hospital b/c I'm the only one in the family who can't
    >>>>> stand it.
    >>>
    >>>> Thing is, if you don't like it, you don't like it. I
    >>>> absolutely hate cabbage
    >>> <blech>, and yet billions of other people like or even love
    >>> it...
    >>>
    >>> I can't say I "love" cabbage and I used to actively dislike
    >>> it. However, that was the result of a British childhood when it was
    >>> served cooked to death. I later found that lightly
    >>> cooked cabbage was rather good and uncooked shredded cabbage had lots
    >>> of uses. Lightly cooked oriental cabbages like Bok
    >>> Choy also taste good to me,
    >>>

    >> I have to agree with your assessment. My mother boiled cabbage
    >> until it fell completely apart. My lovely wife introduced me
    >> to lightly steamed cabbage with a dab of butter and freshly
    >> ground black pepper, I love the stuff now.

    >
    >> Never ate broccoli or asparagus until I married the Yankee
    >> woman, folks in SE Texas back in the day just didn't eat them there
    >> strange foods. Now I love nearly all vegetables but
    >> still don't much care for Brussels sprouts but will eat them
    >> if properly prepared.

    >
    > Brussels Sprouts were cooked to death like cabbage when I was a kid but
    > I really rather like them when cooked for just a few minutes and served
    > with marjoram and a little butter flavor. Broccoli is something I've
    > never had any enthusiasm for cooked or uncooked even tho' the *stems*
    > are tolerable. Even with Chinese and Mexican food I find myself pushing
    > the broccoli to the edge of my plate. I don't mind cooked broccoli
    > served cold with a French dressing (Hungarian style I believe). It's
    > good with Beef or Chicken Paprika


    My grands and great grands will only eat broccoli with a cheese sauce or
    raw with ranch style dressing to dip it in. They won't eat cabbage of
    any sort. Of course the great grands seem to think McDonald's is haute
    cuisine.

  20. #20
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: Cilantro Haters - We're Not Alone!

    On 4/14/2010 2:04 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Wed 14 Apr 2010 09:29:06a, gloria.p told us...
    >
    >> Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >>> Per the NY Times:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/dining/14curious.html
    >>>
    >>> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...who *hates* cilantro
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> I had the same experience as Dr. Gottfried. Cilantro used
    >> to taste very soapy to me until I began to eat more of it
    >> in Mexican food. Now I enjoy its flavor in various dishes.
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > My first experience with cilantro was shortly after it appeared in
    > supermarkets in the Cleveland area. It was displayed right next to the
    > parsley. One night I was hurriedly shopping and picked up several bunches
    > of "parsley" to use in tabouli later that evening. I put the "parsley"
    > through several washes of clear water and then into the salad spinner to
    > dry it. It was when I opened the spinner that I noticed the smell. I
    > tasted a small amount and declared the "parsley" spoiled, immediately
    > stuffing it down the garbage disposer. :-)
    >
    > I have since learned to love it for many uses.


    Well, I can't say I love it but I don't hate it. I'll eat it if
    it's in things but I rarely cook with it myself. I don't like the
    smell. I'll only use it if I'm cooking for company and it's really
    important to the dish, although my definition of important is probably
    quite different from other people's. I would say that virtually
    every dish that calls for it could do without it. And if it's the
    main ingredient I'd just skip the whole thing.

    People talk about the soapy taste. Well, I don't find the taste
    soapy but I find the smell to be like raw sewage. I feel the same
    about asafoetida and I won't use it, but if someone else uses it in
    a dish I'm fine with it. I just don't want to handle it and smell
    it. Blecch!

    Kate


    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

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