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Thread: Christmas dinner

  1. #1
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Christmas dinner

    It's okay to start talking about Christmas dinner now that
    Thanksgiving's over, right? :-)

    My dad and step-mom are on a really strict diet, and because I am who I
    am, I think it will be fun to have a vast feast of things they can eat.
    Of course, everyone in my house will be able to eat everything, too,
    though there will be some things missing that we're used to, like bread.
    No big deal.

    Anyway, here's the menu so far, but I'll be revising it until it feels
    perfect, or until the week before, whichever comes first, so feel free
    to make suggestions if something occurs to you. The rules are no flour
    of any kind (cornstarch, etc.), no added sugar of any kind (honey, etc.
    -- fruits and veggies and things with that naturally-occurring sugar
    content are okay), no dairy, and no wheat at all.


    Wild mushroom stew with brown rice or quinoa (made with homemade chicken
    stock)
    My perfect garlic-crusted standing rib roast
    Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching
    Roasted root vegetables (I usually do potatoes, beets, carrots, and onions)
    Steamed green veggie (broccoli? whatever looks good in the store)
    Baked winter squash with sea salt and pepper
    A huge salad with homemade vinaigrette on the side (dad doesn't do salad
    dressing, never has, but he likes salsa on his salad, so we'll have some
    handy)
    The sugar-free, crustless pumpkin pie (really just a custard) that I
    always make for them at holidays
    A layered fruit salad in a big trifle dish

    Serene
    --
    http://www.momfoodproject.com

  2. #2
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On Nov 25, 9:57*pm, Serene Vannoy <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote:
    >
    > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching
    >

    That is the ideal, but a tiny bit of guar gum and a little MSG is also
    useful.
    >
    > Serene


    --Bryan

  3. #3
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner


    "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > It's okay to start talking about Christmas dinner now that Thanksgiving's
    > over, right? :-)
    >
    > My dad and step-mom are on a really strict diet, and because I am who I
    > am, I think it will be fun to have a vast feast of things they can eat. Of
    > course, everyone in my house will be able to eat everything, too, though
    > there will be some things missing that we're used to, like bread. No big
    > deal.
    >
    > Anyway, here's the menu so far, but I'll be revising it until it feels
    > perfect, or until the week before, whichever comes first, so feel free to
    > make suggestions if something occurs to you. The rules are no flour of
    > any kind (cornstarch, etc.), no added sugar of any kind (honey, etc. --
    > fruits and veggies and things with that naturally-occurring sugar content
    > are okay), no dairy, and no wheat at all.
    >
    >
    > Wild mushroom stew with brown rice or quinoa (made with homemade chicken
    > stock)
    > My perfect garlic-crusted standing rib roast
    > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching
    > Roasted root vegetables (I usually do potatoes, beets, carrots, and
    > onions)
    > Steamed green veggie (broccoli? whatever looks good in the store)
    > Baked winter squash with sea salt and pepper
    > A huge salad with homemade vinaigrette on the side (dad doesn't do salad
    > dressing, never has, but he likes salsa on his salad, so we'll have some
    > handy)
    > The sugar-free, crustless pumpkin pie (really just a custard) that I
    > always make for them at holidays
    > A layered fruit salad in a big trifle dish
    >
    > Serene


    I've never liked dressing on a green salad either but I do like salsa.

    I don't know what we're doing for Christmas. Most likely going out.
    Everyone in my family has some sort food issue, mainly medical, but my
    nephew's fiancÚ won't eat red meat. And my husband being Italian Catholic
    isn't supposed to eat any meat on Christmas Eve. That's when we get
    together for the family meal.

    Most years I make angel hair pasta and shrimp with a ton of garlic for my
    husband. He likes to eat it cold. But nobody else likes it.



  4. #4
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner


    "Bryan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Nov 25, 9:57 pm, Serene Vannoy <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote:
    >
    > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching
    >

    That is the ideal, but a tiny bit of guar gum and a little MSG is also
    useful.

    Guar gum can give a weird texture. I grew up on gravies that were only
    reduced. Never thickened. And MSG is just plain bad for everyone, IMO.



  5. #5
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner


    "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > It's okay to start talking about Christmas dinner now that Thanksgiving's
    > over, right? :-)
    >

    (snipped)

    Sorry, my meal won't be gluten free. John will be here and I'll be roasting
    a couple of cornish game hens. I'll make cornbread dressing. Harvest
    mashed potatoes (a combo of sweet potatoes and russets, really nice).
    Whatever local vegetable is in season (probably some sort of winter squash,
    roasted). Dinner rolls. I'm not much of a baker but I do have a recipe for
    refrigerator rolls that can be prepared/proofed ahead of time. I don't need
    that many rolls but the rolls can be frozen.

    From a Good Housekeeping cookbook my father gave to me on my 19th birthday:

    Refrigerator Rolls

    6 to 6-1/2 c. all-purpose flour
    1/2 c. sugar
    2 tsp. salt
    2 pkgs. Active dry yeast
    1/2 c. butter, softened
    2 c. hot water (120 degrees)
    1 egg
    vegetable oil

    Early in the day or up to 1 week ahead:

    In large bowl, combine 2-1/4 c. flour, sugar, salt and yeast. Add softened
    butter and beat (use a mixer at low speed). Pour hot tap water into
    mixture. Add egg. Increase mixer speed to medium and beat for 2 minutes,
    occasionally scraping the bowl with a spatula. Beat in 3/4 c. flour or
    enough to make a thick batter. Continue beating 2 minutes more, scraping
    the bowl occasionally. With a spoon, stir in enough additional flour to
    make a soft dough.

    Turn the dough onto a lightly floured board and knead until smooth and
    elastic, about 10 minutes. Shape into a ball and place in a large greased
    bowl, turning to coat the dough. Cover with a towel and let rise in a warm
    place until doubled, about 1-1/2 hours.

    Punch dough down and fold it onto itself; turn dough and brush with oil.
    Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate, punching dough down
    occasionally, until ready to use.

    Ready to use? About 2 hours before serving:

    Remove dough from refrigerator. Grease a 15X10 open roasting pan. Cut the
    dough into 30 equal pieces. Roll into balls and place in pan. Cover with a
    towel; let rise in warm place until doubled. They will fill up the pan, but
    will make those great 'tear apart' rolls when done!

    Preheat oven to 425 F. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden brown. Brush
    tops of rolls with melted butter. Remove from pan and serve
    immediately. Makes 2-1/2 doz. rolls.

    Jill


  6. #6
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > It's okay to start talking about Christmas dinner now that Thanksgiving's
    > over, right? :-)
    >
    > My dad and step-mom are on a really strict diet, and because I am who I
    > am, I think it will be fun to have a vast feast of things they can eat. Of
    > course, everyone in my house will be able to eat everything, too, though
    > there will be some things missing that we're used to, like bread. No big
    > deal.
    >
    > Anyway, here's the menu so far, but I'll be revising it until it feels
    > perfect, or until the week before, whichever comes first, so feel free to
    > make suggestions if something occurs to you. The rules are no flour of
    > any kind (cornstarch, etc.), no added sugar of any kind (honey, etc. --
    > fruits and veggies and things with that naturally-occurring sugar content
    > are okay), no dairy, and no wheat at all.
    >
    >
    > Wild mushroom stew with brown rice or quinoa (made with homemade chicken
    > stock)
    > My perfect garlic-crusted standing rib roast
    > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching


    Can you use rice flour? Great thickener. Reductioins to a gravy coinsistany
    tend to overpower. (imho)

    Dimitri




  7. #7
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On Nov 26, 12:21*am, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    > "Bryan" <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    > On Nov 25, 9:57 pm, Serene Vannoy <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote:
    >
    > > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching

    >
    > That is the ideal, but a tiny bit of guar gum and a little MSG is also
    > useful.
    >
    > Guar gum can give a weird texture. *I grew up on gravies that were only
    > reduced. *Never thickened. *And MSG is just plain bad for everyone, IMO.


    You opinion about MSG is based on nothing but crap:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosodium_glutamate

    --Bryan

  8. #8
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On Nov 26, 9:28*am, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > "Serene Vannoy" <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > It's okay to start talking about Christmas dinner now that Thanksgiving's
    > > over, right? :-)

    >
    > > My dad and step-mom are on a really strict diet, and because I am who I
    > > am, I think it will be fun to have a vast feast of things they can eat.Of
    > > course, everyone in my house will be able to eat everything, too, though
    > > there will be some things missing that we're used to, like bread. No big
    > > deal.

    >
    > > Anyway, here's the menu so far, but I'll be revising it until it feels
    > > perfect, or until the week before, whichever comes first, so feel free to
    > > make suggestions if something occurs to you. *The rules are no flour of
    > > any kind (cornstarch, etc.), no added sugar of any kind (honey, etc. --
    > > fruits and veggies and things with that naturally-occurring sugar content
    > > are okay), no dairy, and no wheat at all.

    >
    > > Wild mushroom stew with brown rice or quinoa (made with homemade chicken
    > > stock)
    > > My perfect garlic-crusted standing rib roast
    > > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching

    >
    > Can you use rice flour? Great thickener. Reductioins to a gravy coinsistany
    > tend to overpower. (imho)


    I love intense reductions, but there's never enough gravy then.
    >
    > Dimitri


    --Bryan

  9. #9
    z z Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    I am outvoted every year-we order pizza. I eat pizza all year long, why
    would I want it for Christmas eve dinner? I watch the anorexics in the
    group eat just one slice of cheese only pizza. The next morning there is
    a ton of cold pizza in the fridge. (ok, it does make for a good
    breakfast but I don't care for all the carbs.)

    Mom makes oyster stew the next day for just us-that is what I consider
    my traditional Christmas meal.


  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Wild mushroom stew with brown rice or quinoa (made with homemade chicken
    > stock)


    Yum!

    > My perfect garlic-crusted standing rib roast


    Impressive. :-)

    > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching


    Never tried that yet. I'm going to have to give that a shot.

    > Roasted root vegetables (I usually do potatoes, beets, carrots, and onions)


    Consider adding some celery sections and radishes to that?
    Some here have not been impressed with roasted radishes, but I
    personally love them.

    > Steamed green veggie (broccoli? whatever looks good in the store)


    Meh! Spinach maybe?

    > Baked winter squash with sea salt and pepper


    Ooh baby! Butternut or Acorn? I love Turban squash personally and it
    only comes around this time of year, and if done right, the shell makes
    a lovely serving container.

    > A huge salad with homemade vinaigrette on the side (dad doesn't do salad
    > dressing, never has, but he likes salsa on his salad, so we'll have some
    > handy)


    Consider Insalata Caprese? I just did that for T-day at work and the
    night crew put a good dent in it, and the day shift wiped it out. <g> I
    did the toothpick version for work tho'. Not quite as elegant as the
    real deal, but it's more convenient. I left it undressed and provided
    both a bowl of Italian dressing and a container of Pesto sauce for
    dipping.


    > The sugar-free, crustless pumpkin pie (really just a custard) that I
    > always make for them at holidays


    Yum.

    > A layered fruit salad in a big trifle dish


    If they are doing low carb, too much fruit does not work well unless you
    use low GI index fruits like berries and such.

    Dealing with food restrictions can be a challenge and it's so cool of
    you to respect it! :-)

    >
    > Serene

    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  11. #11
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On Fri, 25 Nov 2011 19:57:12 -0800, Serene Vannoy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It's okay to start talking about Christmas dinner now that
    >Thanksgiving's over, right? :-)


    >
    >Anyway, here's the menu so far,
    >
    >
    >Wild mushroom stew with brown rice or quinoa (made with homemade chicken
    >stock)


    Berkeley Bowl has been having lovely chanterelles lately, for under
    $8/pound.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    In article <jaq0et$56l$[email protected]>,
    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > I've never liked dressing on a green salad either but I do like salsa.
    >
    > I don't know what we're doing for Christmas. Most likely going out.
    > Everyone in my family has some sort food issue, mainly medical, but my
    > nephew's fiancÚ won't eat red meat. And my husband being Italian Catholic
    > isn't supposed to eat any meat on Christmas Eve. That's when we get
    > together for the family meal.
    >
    > Most years I make angel hair pasta and shrimp with a ton of garlic for my
    > husband. He likes to eat it cold. But nobody else likes it.


    Me working nights is an inconvenience for my sister the night owl who
    generally sleeps mornings and I sleep in the afternoon right before
    going to work. I stopped by her apt. with a big bag of fantastic Gala
    Apples I'd bought on sale for $.99 per lb. at Fiesta and discussed the
    holidays with her.

    Thanksgiving, for the past two years, just has not worked. I've had to
    work and she never wants to serve it early. <sighs> I end up feeling
    guilty over asking her to adjust her schedule to mine, so I suggested
    that we just blow off T-day this year. She was amenable and I think,
    relieved. They could still use my smoker if they wanted to. No
    obligation. <g>

    I'll cook for dad and I tomorrow since I have the day off. Simple. No
    whole bird as neither of us really likes the breast meat so I'm roasting
    drumsticks and wings. Thighs were not available at this time but I can
    get some later. I'll roast a sweet potato for dad and I'm steaming
    fresh spinach and a corn, mushroom and bacon succotash for dad as well.
    No dressing or gravy. No need.

    I also have to work Christmas day which is not such a big deal as we
    celebrate Christmas morning. I suggested Christmas Breakfast together
    instead of Christmas dinner and I'd prepare it! Barbacoa breakfast
    fajitas. I'll make the Barbacoa and purchase Avocados, Sour Cream and
    Salsa to go with along with some low carb tortillas and shredded Jack
    Cheese.

    She loved the idea. :-) She's actually the one that suggested Barbacoa
    instead of eggs and bacon or sausage for the breakfast tacos. Both of
    us love it and so does the brother in law and the nephews.

    I have New Years Eve and New Years Day off! I think I'll take a
    sleeping bag and spend the night over there so I can relax a bit...
    I'll make my usual (Insalata Caprese with sliced sourdough baguette)
    and bring Champagne. I think I'll make a Caviar cheese log like I did
    for a New Years party at a friends place. It went over very well! I'll
    toast more Sourdough baguette to serve it on.

    Caviar is a family tradition. Only time we eat it. It's affordable by
    the oz. just not by the lb.!
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  13. #13
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    >
    > "Bryan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > .. On Nov 25, 9:57 pm, Serene Vannoy <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote:
    > >
    > > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching
    > >

    > That is the ideal, but a tiny bit of guar gum and a little MSG is also
    > useful.
    >
    > Guar gum can give a weird texture. I grew up on gravies that were
    > only reduced. Never thickened. And MSG is just plain bad for
    > everyone, IMO.


    Julie, MSG is not bad for you. Thats hype. Used suitably it is a
    lower sodium alternative that reduces salt needs to flavor food.


    --


  14. #14
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On 26/11/2011 2:30 PM, cshenk wrote:
    ..
    >>
    >> Guar gum can give a weird texture. I grew up on gravies that were
    >> only reduced. Never thickened. And MSG is just plain bad for
    >> everyone, IMO.

    >
    > Julie, MSG is not bad for you. Thats hype. Used suitably it is a
    > lower sodium alternative that reduces salt needs to flavor food.
    >



    I don't know about it being bad for you, but it seems not to agree with
    some people. A former co-worker used to claim that MSG stands for My
    Sore Guts.

  15. #15
    BillyZoom Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On Nov 25, 10:57*pm, Serene Vannoy <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote:
    > It's okay to start talking about Christmas dinner now that
    > Thanksgiving's over, right? :-)
    >
    > My dad and step-mom are on a really strict diet, and because I am who I
    > am, I think it will be fun to have a vast feast of things they can eat.
    > Of course, everyone in my house will be able to eat everything, too,
    > though there will be some things missing that we're used to, like bread.
    > No big deal.
    >
    > Anyway, here's the menu so far, but I'll be revising it until it feels
    > perfect, or until the week before, whichever comes first, so feel free
    > to make suggestions if something occurs to you. *The rules are no flour
    > of any kind (cornstarch, etc.), no added sugar of any kind (honey, etc.
    > -- fruits and veggies and things with that naturally-occurring sugar
    > content are okay), no dairy, and no wheat at all.
    >
    > Wild mushroom stew with brown rice or quinoa (made with homemade chicken
    > stock)
    > My perfect garlic-crusted standing rib roast
    > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching
    > Roasted root vegetables (I usually do potatoes, beets, carrots, and onions)
    > Steamed green veggie (broccoli? whatever looks good in the store)
    > Baked winter squash with sea salt and pepper
    > A huge salad with homemade vinaigrette on the side (dad doesn't do salad
    > dressing, never has, but he likes salsa on his salad, so we'll have some
    > handy)
    > The sugar-free, crustless pumpkin pie (really just a custard) that I
    > always make for them at holidays
    > A layered fruit salad in a big trifle dish
    >
    > Serene
    > --http://www.momfoodproject.com


    Sounds wonderful, even for me with no diet restrictions.Only thing is
    I have to have yorkshire pudding. That's my dietary restriction!

  16. #16
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On Nov 25, 10:57*pm, Serene Vannoy <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote:
    > It's okay to start talking about Christmas dinner now that
    > Thanksgiving's over, right? :-)
    >
    > My dad and step-mom are on a really strict diet, and because I am who I
    > am, I think it will be fun to have a vast feast of things they can eat.
    > Of course, everyone in my house will be able to eat everything, too,
    > though there will be some things missing that we're used to, like bread.
    > No big deal.
    >
    > Anyway, here's the menu so far, but I'll be revising it until it feels
    > perfect, or until the week before, whichever comes first, so feel free
    > to make suggestions if something occurs to you. *The rules are no flour
    > of any kind (cornstarch, etc.), no added sugar of any kind (honey, etc.
    > -- fruits and veggies and things with that naturally-occurring sugar
    > content are okay), no dairy, and no wheat at all.
    >
    > Wild mushroom stew with brown rice or quinoa (made with homemade chicken
    > stock)
    > My perfect garlic-crusted standing rib roast
    > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching
    > Roasted root vegetables (I usually do potatoes, beets, carrots, and onions)
    > Steamed green veggie (broccoli? whatever looks good in the store)
    > Baked winter squash with sea salt and pepper
    > A huge salad with homemade vinaigrette on the side (dad doesn't do salad
    > dressing, never has, but he likes salsa on his salad, so we'll have some
    > handy)
    > The sugar-free, crustless pumpkin pie (really just a custard) that I
    > always make for them at holidays
    > A layered fruit salad in a big trifle dish
    >
    > Serene
    > --http://www.momfoodproject.com


    Wow - how many days ahead will you start this extravaganza? I am
    always interested in peoples' game plans.


  17. #17
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On Nov 26, 1:20*am, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    > "Serene Vannoy" <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > It's okay to start talking about Christmas dinner now that Thanksgiving's
    > > over, right? :-)

    >
    > > My dad and step-mom are on a really strict diet, and because I am who I
    > > am, I think it will be fun to have a vast feast of things they can eat.Of
    > > course, everyone in my house will be able to eat everything, too, though
    > > there will be some things missing that we're used to, like bread. No big
    > > deal.

    >
    > > Anyway, here's the menu so far, but I'll be revising it until it feels
    > > perfect, or until the week before, whichever comes first, so feel free to
    > > make suggestions if something occurs to you. *The rules are no flour of
    > > any kind (cornstarch, etc.), no added sugar of any kind (honey, etc. --
    > > fruits and veggies and things with that naturally-occurring sugar content
    > > are okay), no dairy, and no wheat at all.

    >
    > > Wild mushroom stew with brown rice or quinoa (made with homemade chicken
    > > stock)
    > > My perfect garlic-crusted standing rib roast
    > > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching
    > > Roasted root vegetables (I usually do potatoes, beets, carrots, and
    > > onions)
    > > Steamed green veggie (broccoli? whatever looks good in the store)
    > > Baked winter squash with sea salt and pepper
    > > A huge salad with homemade vinaigrette on the side (dad doesn't do salad
    > > dressing, never has, but he likes salsa on his salad, so we'll have some
    > > handy)
    > > The sugar-free, crustless pumpkin pie (really just a custard) that I
    > > always make for them at holidays
    > > A layered fruit salad in a big trifle dish

    >
    > > Serene

    >
    > I've never liked dressing on a green salad either but I do like salsa.
    >
    > I don't know what we're doing for Christmas. *Most likely going out.
    > Everyone in my family has some sort food issue, mainly medical, but my
    > nephew's fiancÚ won't eat red meat. *And my husband being Italian Catholic
    > isn't supposed to eat any meat on Christmas Eve. *That's when we get
    > together for the family meal.
    >
    > Most years I make angel hair pasta and shrimp with a ton of garlic for my
    > husband. *He likes to eat it cold. *But nobody else likes it.


    Yeah - ya gotta have da seven fishes. ( Who can afford it any longer
    is what I wanna know...)

  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 07:29:22 -0800 (PST), Bryan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Nov 26, 12:21*am, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    > > "Bryan" <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > >
    > > news:[email protected]..
    > > On Nov 25, 9:57 pm, Serene Vannoy <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Gravy thickened by reducing instead of starching

    > >
    > > That is the ideal, but a tiny bit of guar gum and a little MSG is also
    > > useful.
    > >
    > > Guar gum can give a weird texture. *I grew up on gravies that were only
    > > reduced. *Never thickened. *And MSG is just plain bad for everyone, IMO.

    >
    > You opinion about MSG is based on nothing but crap:
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosodium_glutamate
    >

    Some people get really bad headaches after eating it. I'm not one of
    them, but my sister in law was.


    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 10:42:21 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I suggested Christmas Breakfast together
    > instead of Christmas dinner and I'd prepare it! Barbacoa breakfast
    > fajitas. I'll make the Barbacoa and purchase Avocados, Sour Cream and
    > Salsa to go with along with some low carb tortillas and shredded Jack
    > Cheese.


    How do you make the Barbacoa?

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Christmas dinner

    On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 08:25:42 -0800, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Berkeley Bowl has been having lovely chanterelles lately, for under
    > $8/pound.


    I wish I lived on that side of the Bay. It's not worth the trip
    and bridge toll to go just for chanterelles.

    Perking up... we're headed to Vacaville on Monday, so maybe I can
    convince hubby to make a pit stop at Berkeley Bowl.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

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