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Thread: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    I needed some for a no-cook chocolate truffle recipe and could only
    find one brand - at $3.99 for nine ounces! Any other choices?

    Lenona.

  2. #2
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    On Sat, 8 Nov 2008 09:05:19 -0800 (PST), [email protected] wrote:

    >I needed some for a no-cook chocolate truffle recipe and could only
    >find one brand - at $3.99 for nine ounces! Any other choices?
    >
    >Lenona.


    The only name I am familiar with is Nabisco. A Google search for
    chocolate wafers has some other names and options.

  3. #3
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I needed some for a no-cook chocolate truffle recipe and could only
    > find one brand - at $3.99 for nine ounces! Any other choices?
    >
    > Lenona.



    Nabisco is the only brand I have ever seen (and I remember when they
    were $.99/box.)

    An alternative might be chocolate graham crackers or Oreos with the
    "creme filling" scraped off. Or maybe even vanilla wafers with
    cocoa or melted chocolate added....

    gloria p

  4. #4
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?


    Gloria P wrote:
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > I needed some for a no-cook chocolate truffle recipe and could only
    > > find one brand - at $3.99 for nine ounces! Any other choices?
    > >
    > > Lenona.

    >
    > Nabisco is the only brand I have ever seen (and I remember when they
    > were $.99/box.)
    >
    > An alternative might be chocolate graham crackers or Oreos with the
    > "creme filling" scraped off. Or maybe even vanilla wafers with
    > cocoa or melted chocolate added....
    >
    > gloria p


    I'm sure there are some recipes out there for chocolate wafers...

  5. #5
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    Pete C. wrote:
    > Gloria P wrote:
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>> I needed some for a no-cook chocolate truffle recipe and could only
    >>> find one brand - at $3.99 for nine ounces! Any other choices?
    >>>
    >>> Lenona.

    >> Nabisco is the only brand I have ever seen (and I remember when they
    >> were $.99/box.)
    >>
    >> An alternative might be chocolate graham crackers or Oreos with the
    >> "creme filling" scraped off. Or maybe even vanilla wafers with
    >> cocoa or melted chocolate added....
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > I'm sure there are some recipes out there for chocolate wafers...



    Of course there are, but is it worth the extra step when the wafers will
    be crumbled for use as an ingredient?

    gloria p

  6. #6
    Default User Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    Pete C. wrote:

    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > > > I needed some for a no-cook chocolate truffle recipe and could
    > > > only find one brand - at $3.99 for nine ounces! Any other choices?


    > I'm sure there are some recipes out there for chocolate wafers...


    I'd say baking chocolate wafers to make a no-cook truffle was somewhat
    counter-productive.




    Brian

    --
    If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
    won't shut up.
    -- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)

  7. #7
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    Default User wrote:
    > Pete C. wrote:
    >
    >>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>> I needed some for a no-cook chocolate truffle recipe and could
    >>>> only find one brand - at $3.99 for nine ounces! Any other choices?

    >
    >> I'm sure there are some recipes out there for chocolate wafers...

    >
    > I'd say baking chocolate wafers to make a no-cook truffle was somewhat
    > counter-productive.
    > Brian
    >


    Not sure what purpose the chocolate wafers would serve in a truffle
    recipe. Just do a google search on Kay Hartman's truffles and leave
    perfection alone. No wafers necessary.

  8. #8
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    On Nov 8, 1:36 pm, Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:

    > Not sure what purpose the chocolate wafers would serve in a truffle
    > recipe. Just do a google search on Kay Hartman's truffles and leave
    > perfection alone. No wafers necessary.


    Well, I was in a hurry, so the recipe I used was convenient. (I also
    used a food processor.)

    Besides the wafers, the other ingredients were:

    Almonds
    Corn syrup
    Marmalade
    Cointreau

    You then roll each truffle in powdered sugar and sprinkle grated
    orange rind on top. (I had to settle for large decorative flakes of
    rind, since when I tried to make it very fine, it just turned into wet
    mush.)

    Only trouble is, it said you're supposed to let them "ripen" in a cool
    place for a week! But I suppose they'll taste good enough to the
    recipient anyway.

    Lenona.

  9. #9
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Nov 8, 1:36 pm, Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Not sure what purpose the chocolate wafers would serve in a truffle
    >> recipe. Just do a google search on Kay Hartman's truffles and leave
    >> perfection alone. No wafers necessary.

    >
    > Well, I was in a hurry, so the recipe I used was convenient. (I also
    > used a food processor.)
    >
    > Besides the wafers, the other ingredients were:
    >
    > Almonds
    > Corn syrup
    > Marmalade
    > Cointreau
    >
    > You then roll each truffle in powdered sugar and sprinkle grated
    > orange rind on top. (I had to settle for large decorative flakes of
    > rind, since when I tried to make it very fine, it just turned into wet
    > mush.)
    >
    > Only trouble is, it said you're supposed to let them "ripen" in a cool
    > place for a week! But I suppose they'll taste good enough to the
    > recipient anyway.
    >
    > Lenona.


    What you made really sounds like a differently-flavored rum ball kind of
    thing. It isn't a truffle in the classic sense. (Of course, some people mash
    up leftover icing and cake crumbs, dip it in chocolate, and call it a "cake
    truffle.")

    But anyway...for future reference, a good way to get a nice thin little
    strip of orange rind for garnishing is to use a fine-sized version of the
    very sharp carpenter's rasp kind of grater. Just let the pieces fall onto
    waxed paper or a cutting board, and try not to let them heap up. They dry
    nicely, too, and have great curvy shapes. Much better than any "zester" I've
    ever owned.



  10. #10
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    On Sat 08 Nov 2008 10:05:19a, told us...

    > I needed some for a no-cook chocolate truffle recipe and could only
    > find one brand - at $3.99 for nine ounces! Any other choices?
    >
    > Lenona.


    I doubt seriously if you could duplicate the Nabisco “Famous Chocolate
    Wafers”, or if you could, whether it would be worth the trouble, especially
    since you’re going to reduce them to crumbs for your recipe.

    I’m not aware of any other cookie that’s quite the same as these. Even if
    there were, they probably wouldn’t be much if any cheaper.

    I can remember when these once cost 79¢ to 99¢ per package, but like
    everything else, prices of foods have increased dramatically.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    (correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)

    *******************************************
    Date: Saturday, 11(XI)/08(VIII)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    2dys 7hrs 58mins
    *******************************************
    It's hard to be serious when you're naked.
    *******************************************

  11. #11
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    On Sat, 08 Nov 2008 11:23:03 -0700, Gloria P <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Pete C. wrote:


    >> I'm sure there are some recipes out there for chocolate wafers...

    >
    >
    >Of course there are, but is it worth the extra step when the wafers will
    >be crumbled for use as an ingredient?
    >
    >gloria p


    If you are Kay Hartman, it was worth it. LOL.

    Somewhere in the rfc archives is a recipe that Kay posted for a recipe
    for chocolate wafer cookies. She used it for the same things that one
    would use the Nabisco chocolate wafers.

    I have the copy of this somewhere in my files..but I think it is
    either something I printed out long ago, or have it on my laptop.

    Christine

  12. #12
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    On Sat, 08 Nov 2008 23:05:59 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >I doubt seriously if you could duplicate the Nabisco “Famous Chocolate
    >Wafers”, or if you could, whether it would be worth the trouble, especially
    >since you’re going to reduce them to crumbs for your recipe.


    Kay Hartman did it.

    I remember saving her recipe somewhere, because I was thinking it
    might be nice to have it on hand, in case I couldn't find the Nabisco
    cookies.

    Christine

  13. #13
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    On Sat, 08 Nov 2008 23:05:59 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat 08 Nov 2008 10:05:19a, told us...
    >
    >> I needed some for a no-cook chocolate truffle recipe and could only
    >> find one brand - at $3.99 for nine ounces! Any other choices?
    >>
    >> Lenona.

    >
    >I doubt seriously if you could duplicate the Nabisco “Famous Chocolate
    >Wafers”, or if you could, whether it would be worth the trouble, especially
    >since you’re going to reduce them to crumbs for your recipe.
    >


    I found the recipe that Kay Hartman used...

    Christine

    CHOCOLATE WAFERS

    Wonderful thin, crisp, plain cookies, the dough is rolled out and cut
    with
    a cookie cutter. The recipe can easily be doubled if you wish.

    2 ounces (2 squares) unsweetened chocolate
    1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sifted all-purpose flour
    3/4 teaspoon double-acting baking powder
    1/4 teaspoon baking soda
    Pinch of salt
    2 ounces (1/2 stick) sweet butter
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1/2 cup granulated sugar
    1 1/2 teaspoons light cream or milk
    1 egg (graded large)

    Place the chocolate in the top of a small double boiler over hot water
    on
    moderate heat. Cover until partially melted, then uncover and stir
    until
    smooth. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool slightly.

    Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt and set
    aside.

    In the large bowl of an electric mixer cream the butter. Add the
    vanilla
    and sugar and beat to mix well. Add the melted chocolate and beat
    until
    incorporated. Then add the light cream or milk and the egg and beat
    to mix

    well. On low speed add the sifted dry ingredients, scraping the bowl
    with
    a rubber spatula and beating only until incorporated.

    Place the dough on a piece of wax paper, fold the sides of the paper
    over
    the dough and press down on the paper to flatten the dough to a scant
    1-inch thickness, wrap in the paper and refrigerate for 20 to 30
    minutes --

    no longer or the dough will crack when you roll it out. (However, if
    you
    do refrigerate it for longer -- even overnight -- let it stand at room
    temperature for about an hour before rolling it out.)

    Adjust two racks to divide oven into thirds and preheat oven to 400
    degrees. Line cookie sheets with aluminum foil.

    Flour a pastry cloth and place the dough on it. (If you have doubled
    the
    recipe, roll only half of the dough at a time.) With a floured
    rolling pin

    -- which should be re floured frequently to avoid sticking -- roll the
    dough

    out until it is only 1/8-inch thick (thin).

    I use a round cookie cutter that is 2 3/4 inches in diameter -- use
    any
    size you like, and cut the cookies as close to each other as possible.

    Place the cookies 1/2 inch apart on the aluminum foil. (It might be
    necessary to transfer the cookies from the pastry cloth to the foil
    with a
    wide metal spatula -- handle them carefully in order to keep them
    perfectly

    round and flat.)

    Leftover pieces of the dough should be pressed together and re rolled.

    Bake two sheets at a time for 7 to 8 minutes, reversing the sheets top
    to
    bottom and front to back once to insure even taking. Bake until the
    cookies feel almost firm to the touch. These are supposed to be crisp
    (they will become more crisp as they cool) and they should not be
    underbaked, but watch them carefully to be sure they do not burn. (If
    you
    bake one sheet at a time, bake it on the upper rack.)

    With a wide metal spatula, transfer the cookies to racks to cool.
    Store
    airtight. Makes 36 2 3/4 inch cookies.

  14. #14
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?



    Christine Dabney wrote:
    >
    > On Sat, 08 Nov 2008 23:05:59 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Sat 08 Nov 2008 10:05:19a, told us...
    > >
    > >> I needed some for a no-cook chocolate truffle recipe and could only
    > >> find one brand - at $3.99 for nine ounces! Any other choices?
    > >>
    > >> Lenona.

    > >
    > >I doubt seriously if you could duplicate the Nabisco “Famous Chocolate
    > >Wafers”, or if you could, whether it would be worth the trouble, especially
    > >since you’re going to reduce them to crumbs for your recipe.




    Do these come out like Oreo wafers? Love the wafers, hate the filling!



    > >

    >
    > I found the recipe that Kay Hartman used...
    >
    > Christine
    >
    > CHOCOLATE WAFERS
    >
    > Wonderful thin, crisp, plain cookies, the dough is rolled out and cut
    > with
    > a cookie cutter. The recipe can easily be doubled if you wish.
    >
    > 2 ounces (2 squares) unsweetened chocolate
    > 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sifted all-purpose flour
    > 3/4 teaspoon double-acting baking powder
    > 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
    > Pinch of salt
    > 2 ounces (1/2 stick) sweet butter
    > 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    > 1/2 cup granulated sugar
    > 1 1/2 teaspoons light cream or milk
    > 1 egg (graded large)
    >
    > Place the chocolate in the top of a small double boiler over hot water
    > on
    > moderate heat. Cover until partially melted, then uncover and stir
    > until
    > smooth. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool slightly.
    >
    > Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt and set
    > aside.
    >
    > In the large bowl of an electric mixer cream the butter. Add the
    > vanilla
    > and sugar and beat to mix well. Add the melted chocolate and beat
    > until
    > incorporated. Then add the light cream or milk and the egg and beat
    > to mix
    >
    > well. On low speed add the sifted dry ingredients, scraping the bowl
    > with
    > a rubber spatula and beating only until incorporated.
    >
    > Place the dough on a piece of wax paper, fold the sides of the paper
    > over
    > the dough and press down on the paper to flatten the dough to a scant
    > 1-inch thickness, wrap in the paper and refrigerate for 20 to 30
    > minutes --
    >
    > no longer or the dough will crack when you roll it out. (However, if
    > you
    > do refrigerate it for longer -- even overnight -- let it stand at room
    > temperature for about an hour before rolling it out.)
    >
    > Adjust two racks to divide oven into thirds and preheat oven to 400
    > degrees. Line cookie sheets with aluminum foil.
    >
    > Flour a pastry cloth and place the dough on it. (If you have doubled
    > the
    > recipe, roll only half of the dough at a time.) With a floured
    > rolling pin
    >
    > -- which should be re floured frequently to avoid sticking -- roll the
    > dough
    >
    > out until it is only 1/8-inch thick (thin).
    >
    > I use a round cookie cutter that is 2 3/4 inches in diameter -- use
    > any
    > size you like, and cut the cookies as close to each other as possible.
    >
    > Place the cookies 1/2 inch apart on the aluminum foil. (It might be
    > necessary to transfer the cookies from the pastry cloth to the foil
    > with a
    > wide metal spatula -- handle them carefully in order to keep them
    > perfectly
    >
    > round and flat.)
    >
    > Leftover pieces of the dough should be pressed together and re rolled.
    >
    > Bake two sheets at a time for 7 to 8 minutes, reversing the sheets top
    > to
    > bottom and front to back once to insure even taking. Bake until the
    > cookies feel almost firm to the touch. These are supposed to be crisp
    > (they will become more crisp as they cool) and they should not be
    > underbaked, but watch them carefully to be sure they do not burn. (If
    > you
    > bake one sheet at a time, bake it on the upper rack.)
    >
    > With a wide metal spatula, transfer the cookies to racks to cool.
    > Store
    > airtight. Makes 36 2 3/4 inch cookies.


  15. #15
    Marcella Peek Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?

    Newman's Own sells the cookies plain without the filling. I do think
    they taste different than Oreo, but I like them better.

    marcella


    In article <[email protected]>, Arri London <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > Do these come out like Oreo wafers? Love the wafers, hate the filling!
    >


  16. #16
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate wafers - brand names?



    Marcella Peek wrote:
    >
    > Newman's Own sells the cookies plain without the filling. I do think
    > they taste different than Oreo, but I like them better.
    >
    > marcella


    TY. Will give it a go. It's the texture that's wanted. That crispness
    that we haven't achieved so far in various 'Oreo-effect' wafers.



    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, Arri London <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Do these come out like Oreo wafers? Love the wafers, hate the filling!
    > >


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