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Thread: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

  1. #1
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    The thought occurred to me that it might be possible
    to run chocolate though a cotton candy machine.
    It might be necessary to reduce the heat of the
    heater, because chocolate melts at a much lower
    temperature tthan sugar. Also, it might be necessary
    to spin the chocolate in a cold atmosphere, so the
    chocolate would solidfy quickly.

    Some additive might be necessary so that the filaments
    would be strong. Sugar might work for that, though
    it would be better if that could be avoided.

    Any thoughts? Anyone got a machine?

  2. #2
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    On Oct 7, 10:05*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > The thought occurred to me that it might be possible
    > to run chocolate though a cotton candy machine.
    > It might be necessary to reduce the heat of the
    > heater, because chocolate melts at a much lower
    > temperature tthan sugar. *Also, it might be necessary
    > to spin the chocolate in a cold atmosphere, so the
    > chocolate would solidfy quickly.
    >
    > Some additive might be necessary so that the filaments
    > would be strong. *Sugar might work for that, though
    > it would be better if that could be avoided.
    >
    > Any thoughts? *Anyone got a machine?


    ============================================
    Why don't you just get one of those fountain thingies?
    Lynn in Fargo
    Imagining hot ribbons of flying chocolate . . .

  3. #3
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    On Oct 7, 11:05 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > The thought occurred to me that it might be possible
    > to run chocolate though a cotton candy machine.
    > It might be necessary to reduce the heat of the
    > heater, because chocolate melts at a much lower
    > temperature tthan sugar. Also, it might be necessary
    > to spin the chocolate in a cold atmosphere, so the
    > chocolate would solidfy quickly.
    >
    > Some additive might be necessary so that the filaments
    > would be strong. Sugar might work for that, though
    > it would be better if that could be avoided.
    >
    > Any thoughts? Anyone got a machine?



    I think, no. Fun idea, though. Why do you want to do this?

    I was a party clown once, ran the rented cotton candy machine. Really
    pretty fun - do it if you get the chance.

    Sugar and chocolate are very different substances. Might be possible
    to chocolate-flavor the sugar, but I'm no food tech.

    Bulka

  4. #4
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    On Oct 7, 10:05*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > The thought occurred to me that it might be possible
    > to run chocolate though a cotton candy machine.
    > It might be necessary to reduce the heat of the
    > heater, because chocolate melts at a much lower
    > temperature tthan sugar. *Also, it might be necessary
    > to spin the chocolate in a cold atmosphere, so the
    > chocolate would solidfy quickly.
    >
    > Some additive might be necessary so that the filaments
    > would be strong. *Sugar might work for that, though
    > it would be better if that could be avoided.
    >
    > Any thoughts? *Anyone got a machine?


    Sounds like a weird idea, but it might work using cocoa for the
    chocolate....

    N.

  5. #5
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > The thought occurred to me that it might be possible
    > to run chocolate though a cotton candy machine.
    > It might be necessary to reduce the heat of the
    > heater, because chocolate melts at a much lower
    > temperature tthan sugar. Also, it might be necessary
    > to spin the chocolate in a cold atmosphere, so the
    > chocolate would solidfy quickly.
    >
    > Some additive might be necessary so that the filaments
    > would be strong. Sugar might work for that, though
    > it would be better if that could be avoided.
    >
    > Any thoughts? Anyone got a machine?
    >


    You are crazy! But I like that in a person. :-P Just the idea of doing
    this, made me laugh. If I had a machine, I would send it to you.

    Becca

  6. #6
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    Nancy2 wrote:
    >
    > Sounds like a weird idea, but it might work using cocoa
    > for the chocolate....


    I think it would be more likely to work with
    a high fat content, like a 99% bar, rather
    than cocoa.

    Wouldn't that be great if you could make
    chocolate cotton candy? Probably a mess
    to eat, but everybody would want to try it
    at least once.

  7. #7
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    On Oct 7, 11:05�pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > The thought occurred to me that it might be possible
    > to run chocolate though a cotton candy machine.
    > It might be necessary to reduce the heat of the
    > heater, because chocolate melts at a much lower
    > temperature tthan sugar. �Also, it might be necessary
    > to spin the chocolate in a cold atmosphere, so the
    > chocolate would solidfy quickly.
    >
    > Some additive might be necessary so that the filaments
    > would be strong. �Sugar might work for that, though
    > it would be better if that could be avoided.
    >
    > Any thoughts? �Anyone got a machine?


    If any cocoa fat is present all you will make is a schticky mess.

  8. #8
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    On Oct 8, 3:32 pm, Sheldon <PENMAR...@aol.com> wrote:
    > On Oct 7, 11:05 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >
    > > The thought occurred to me that it might be possible
    > > to run chocolate though a cotton candy machine.
    > > It might be necessary to reduce the heat of the
    > > heater, because chocolate melts at a much lower
    > > temperature tthan sugar. Also, it might be necessary
    > > to spin the chocolate in a cold atmosphere, so the
    > > chocolate would solidfy quickly.

    >
    > > Some additive might be necessary so that the filaments
    > > would be strong. Sugar might work for that, though
    > > it would be better if that could be avoided.

    >
    > > Any thoughts? Anyone got a machine?

    >
    > If any cocoa fat is present all you will make is a schticky mess.


    Warning - serious drifting.

    I'm sure that there must be some state fair or carnival or NASCAR
    event that hosts an X-treme fair food contest. Between this and the
    chicken-fried thread, we could have a contender.

    A pork chop or turkey leg on a stick, run through the candy machine,
    chocolate coated, dipped in chicken or elephant ear batter, fried hot
    enough to cook the batter without melting the sugar. Garnished with
    sprinkles and pinapple circles.

    No. Needs some serious work. But how about something where you go
    through the appetizer, salad, meat and dessert, all on the same
    stick. Probably have to skip the soup course.

    Baked alaska core with a savory or double savory to sweet crust,
    rolled in - what passes for an appetizer at the fair? Cheetoes? Pork
    rind?

    mBulka




  9. #9
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    Sheldon wrote:
    >
    > If any cocoa fat is present all you will make is a schticky mess.


    I was thinking of putting dry ice or liquid nitrogen
    in the bowl of the machine, so the threads would solidify
    in the atmosphere of the bowl before hitting anything.
    I'd gather up the threads on a paper cone like regular
    cotton candy. If an unmodified dark chocolate bar
    can be turned into chocolate cotton candy, that would
    be great stuff I believe.

  10. #10
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    On Oct 8, 10:42*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    >
    > > If any cocoa fat is present all you will make is a schticky mess.

    >
    > I was thinking of putting dry ice or liquid nitrogen
    > in the bowl of the machine, so the threads would solidify
    > in the atmosphere of the bowl before hitting anything.
    > I'd gather up the threads on a paper cone like regular
    > cotton candy. *If an unmodified dark chocolate bar
    > can be turned into chocolate cotton candy, that would
    > be great stuff I believe.


    I'm not a physicist (nor do I play one on TV) but don't you think if
    you first melted hocolate so it would flow and then you flash froze it
    it would just shatter into chocolate dust?
    Lynn in FArgo

  11. #11
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    Lynn from Fargo wrote:
    >
    > On Oct 8, 10:42 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > > Sheldon wrote:
    > >
    > > > If any cocoa fat is present all you will make is a schticky mess.

    > >
    > > I was thinking of putting dry ice or liquid nitrogen
    > > in the bowl of the machine, so the threads would solidify
    > > in the atmosphere of the bowl before hitting anything.
    > > I'd gather up the threads on a paper cone like regular
    > > cotton candy. If an unmodified dark chocolate bar
    > > can be turned into chocolate cotton candy, that would
    > > be great stuff I believe.

    >
    > I'm not a physicist (nor do I play one on TV) but don't you think if
    > you first melted hocolate so it would flow and then you flash froze it
    > it would just shatter into chocolate dust?


    If that happens, raise the temperature! Cotton candy
    is made from sugar that is melted, then refreezes shortly
    after leaving the spinnerets of the cotton candy machine.
    That works because the sugar is really hot, so it cools
    rapidly in air before hitting the bowl or the paper cone
    used to gather it. Because chocolate melts at a much
    lower temperature, I'm thinking the heater would have
    to be modified to run at a lower temperature or simply
    disabled (with liquid chocolate from a tempering machine
    ladled in). To accomplish the cooling within a reasonable
    distance from the spinnerets, a cold atmosphere in the bowl
    might be necessary.

    I've been thinking compound chocolate would actually be
    more likely to be successful, at least on the first try.

  12. #12
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    In rec.food.chocolate Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > The thought occurred to me that it might be possible
    > to run chocolate though a cotton candy machine.


    > Some additive might be necessary so that the filaments
    > would be strong. Sugar might work for that, though
    > it would be better if that could be avoided.


    > Any thoughts? Anyone got a machine?


    My thoughts are that cotton candy is threads of sugar
    and it depends on the crystalization properties of
    sugar. Chocolate has a large fat/oil content and though
    it does crystalize, the properties are very different and
    depends on the crystal structure to "capture" the fat.

    You might be able to make a chocolate flavored cotton
    candy by adding cocoa powder to rugular cotton candy
    syrup. Or, you might get something to work by adding
    corn syrup to chocolate.

    For sure you are going to have a big sticky mess many
    times before you get this to work, if it ever does.

    Bill Ranck
    Blacksburg, Va.

  13. #13
    isw Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sheldon wrote:
    > >
    > > If any cocoa fat is present all you will make is a schticky mess.

    >
    > I was thinking of putting dry ice or liquid nitrogen
    > in the bowl of the machine, so the threads would solidify
    > in the atmosphere of the bowl before hitting anything.


    Gases of all sorts are poor conductors of heat. I suspect that even the
    air over liquid NO2 wouldn't be all that able to cool off the hot
    strands.

    Isaac

  14. #14
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    isw wrote:
    >
    > Gases of all sorts are poor conductors of heat. I suspect that
    > even the air over liquid NO2 wouldn't be all that able to cool
    > off the hot strands.


    Conduction is less important than specific heat.
    Short bursts of strands, rather than long bursts,
    would allow the atmosphere in the bowl to recover
    through convection.

  15. #15
    nawteeschocolate Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    On Oct 11, 10:10*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > isw wrote:
    >
    > > Gases of all sorts are poor conductors of heat. I suspect that
    > > even the air over liquid NO2 wouldn't be all that able to cool
    > > off the hot strands.

    >
    > Conduction is less important than specific heat.
    > Short bursts of strands, rather than long bursts,
    > would allow the atmosphere in the bowl to recover
    > through convection.


    you also need to know more about the chemistry involved with
    chocolate...you can only melt it at certain temperatures and you would
    need to temper it. to freeze it would cause it to turn grey...not
    appetizng for sales...the best bet for chocolate cotton candy, which
    is an awesome idea, might be to incorporate the cocoa in the mix...i
    hope you play with this, after you have learned more about the
    chemistry, which is not hard, of chocolate. the chocolate if heated
    and then flash frozen would shatter...it has to be part of something
    that "carries" it...something that it is added to...and the other
    poster who advised that cocoa added to the mix was/is on the right
    track.
    annette

  16. #16
    flitterbit Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > isw wrote:
    >> Gases of all sorts are poor conductors of heat. I suspect that
    >> even the air over liquid NO2 wouldn't be all that able to cool
    >> off the hot strands.

    >
    > Conduction is less important than specific heat.
    > Short bursts of strands, rather than long bursts,
    > would allow the atmosphere in the bowl to recover
    > through convection.
    >
    >

    This isn't about chocolate in a cotton candy machine per se; rather,
    it's about a Japanese cotton candy machine that uses any hard candy of
    any flavour to make candy floss:

    <http://technabob.com/blog/2008/10/13/ame-de-wataame-makes-cotton-candy-out-of-jolly-ranchers/>

    or, if you prefer, tiny url:

    http://tinyurl.com/4k5lhz


  17. #17
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    flitterbit wrote:
    >
    > This isn't about chocolate in a cotton candy machine per se; rather,
    > it's about a Japanese cotton candy machine that uses any hard candy of
    > any flavour to make candy floss:


    Interesting, but it's rather expensive for a toy machine.
    Machines like this have been sold in the U.S. for much
    cheaper. The only difference appears to be that this
    machine seems to accept large pieces. I suppose you
    could do the same thing with a conventional machine
    if you crush up the candies with a mortar and pestle
    or whiz them in a food processor before fedding them
    into the machine.

    Note how small are the portions it produces, necessitated
    by the small bowl.

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate In A Cotton Candy Machine

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > The thought occurred to me that it might be possible
    > to run chocolate though a cotton candy machine.
    > It might be necessary to reduce the heat of the
    > heater, because chocolate melts at a much lower
    > temperature tthan sugar. Also, it might be necessary
    > to spin the chocolate in a cold atmosphere, so the
    > chocolate would solidfy quickly.
    >
    > Some additive might be necessary so that the filaments
    > would be strong. Sugar might work for that, though
    > it would be better if that could be avoided.
    >
    > Any thoughts? Anyone got a machine?


    It wouldn't harden quick enough to make threads.

    For a similar effect, try drizzling melted chocolate over a slowly
    deflating Teflon-coated balloon.

    -sw

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