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Thread: Chinkiang Pork

  1. #1
    aem Guest

    Default Chinkiang Pork

    Chinkiang vinegar, aka Chinese black vinegar, is rich, similar to
    balsamic. This sauce comes out like a sophisticated sweet-sour,
    though the ingredients are anything but sophisticated. Other vinegars
    might work but I strongly encourage you to find Chinkiang next time
    you're in an Asian market. The 1/4 teaspoon A-1 sauce is not
    omittable, in my opinion.

    I lb. of boneless pork cutlets. Pound them to about 1/4-inch
    thickness and cut them into 2 or 3 pieces, then marinate in:
    2 TB rice wine or dry sherry
    1 teaspoon soy sauce
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 egg, beaten
    1/2 teaspoon cornstarch

    Combine and set aside:
    3 TB Chinkiang or balsamic vinegar
    3 TB sugar
    1 TB ketchup
    1/4 teaspoon A-1 sauce
    1/4 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    Put a heavy pan over high heat until quite hot, swirl in 1 TB of oil.
    Put 1/4 cup cornstarch in a dish and lightly dredge the pork. Then
    add it to the pan and fry 1 minute. Add another TB of oil, reduce
    heat to medium and fry another 2 minutes. Turn the pork pieces over
    and fry another 2 minutes. Remove.

    Add another 2 TB oil, then 2 teaspoons minced garlic, stirfry for
    about 10 or 20 seconds. Stir in the vinegar sauce mixture and bring
    to a boil. Return the pork to the pan, reduce heat to a simmer, cook
    until pork is just done--probably another 3 minutes or so.

    This recpe adapted from Grace Young's "The Breath of a Wok" where it
    was adapted from Chef Henry Hugh of the New School Culinary Arts,
    NYC. -aem

  2. #2
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Chinkiang Pork

    aem <[email protected]> news:c1096a1c-0853-48da-a473-
    [email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    > Chinkiang vinegar, aka Chinese black vinegar, is rich, similar to
    > balsamic. This sauce comes out like a sophisticated sweet-sour,
    > though the ingredients are anything but sophisticated. Other vinegars
    > might work but I strongly encourage you to find Chinkiang next time
    > you're in an Asian market. The 1/4 teaspoon A-1 sauce is not
    > omittable, in my opinion.
    >


    <snipped and saved>

    Thanks for the recipe. I think I might try this soon. I've got a ton of
    pork in the freezer and this recipe might just fit the bill. I've got to
    find the vinegar first. I'll do it in the wok instead of a pan.

    Michael

    --
    “He who does not understand your silence will probably not understand your
    words.”
    ~Elbert Hubbard

    You can find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  3. #3
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Chinkiang Pork

    aem wrote:
    > Chinkiang vinegar, aka Chinese black vinegar, is rich, similar to
    > balsamic. This sauce comes out like a sophisticated sweet-sour,
    > though the ingredients are anything but sophisticated. Other vinegars
    > might work but I strongly encourage you to find Chinkiang next time
    > you're in an Asian market. The 1/4 teaspoon A-1 sauce is not
    > omittable, in my opinion.
    >
    > I lb. of boneless pork cutlets. Pound them to about 1/4-inch
    > thickness and cut them into 2 or 3 pieces, then marinate in:
    > 2 TB rice wine or dry sherry
    > 1 teaspoon soy sauce
    > 1/2 teaspoon salt
    > 1 egg, beaten
    > 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
    >
    > Combine and set aside:
    > 3 TB Chinkiang or balsamic vinegar
    > 3 TB sugar
    > 1 TB ketchup
    > 1/4 teaspoon A-1 sauce
    > 1/4 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
    > 1/4 teaspoon salt
    >
    > Put a heavy pan over high heat until quite hot, swirl in 1 TB of oil.
    > Put 1/4 cup cornstarch in a dish and lightly dredge the pork. Then
    > add it to the pan and fry 1 minute. Add another TB of oil, reduce
    > heat to medium and fry another 2 minutes. Turn the pork pieces over
    > and fry another 2 minutes. Remove.
    >
    > Add another 2 TB oil, then 2 teaspoons minced garlic, stirfry for
    > about 10 or 20 seconds. Stir in the vinegar sauce mixture and bring
    > to a boil. Return the pork to the pan, reduce heat to a simmer, cook
    > until pork is just done--probably another 3 minutes or so.
    >
    > This recpe adapted from Grace Young's "The Breath of a Wok" where it
    > was adapted from Chef Henry Hugh of the New School Culinary Arts,
    > NYC. -aem


    This looks interesting. Thanks.

    --
    Jean B.

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Chinkiang Pork

    aem <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Chinkiang vinegar, aka Chinese black vinegar, is rich, similar to
    > balsamic.


    I think it's more like malt vinegar.

    It's great when used in place of rice wine vinegar in dips for
    pot-stickers, egg rolls, etc.. I go through a bottle every 5-6
    months (they're 500ml bottles).

    -sw

  5. #5
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Chinkiang Pork

    On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 19:59:42 -0600, Sqwertz wrote:

    > aem <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Chinkiang vinegar, aka Chinese black vinegar, is rich, similar to
    >> balsamic.

    >
    > I think it's more like malt vinegar.
    >
    > It's great when used in place of rice wine vinegar in dips for
    > pot-stickers, egg rolls, etc.. I go through a bottle every 5-6
    > months (they're 500ml bottles).
    >
    > -sw


    i too am puzzled by the comparison to balsamic. they don't seem similar to
    me (but then i've not had the really expensive balsamic).

    your pal,
    blake

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