Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36

Thread: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

  1. #1
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 17:15:03 GMT, blake murphy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> I've tried the Chinese stuff with water and thought it was going to
    >> taste like the stuff in the packets from take out places. It wasn't
    >> the same. I read you can use vinegar. I dunno. I'd love to be able
    >> to make it. I've tried a bunch of different store brands and none
    >> taste like the packets. I've mixed wasabi with water and that was
    >> acceptable.
    >>
    >> Lou


    I started a new thread because we're pretty far from grilled cheese
    and I'm selfish and want to lure in anyone who are knowledgable on
    this. <insert smiley face here>

    >have you tried the colman's mustard powder?


    Yes.

    >it makes a very snappy mustard.


    True, but it's not like the packets. A different flavor and not as
    hot.

    >(the stuff in the packets from my chinese take-out seem a little
    >bland to me.)


    <shrug> I dunno. We don't order out much but whenever we do I always
    ask for as many packs as they'll give me. There's nothing bland about
    it. When we were moving a couple years ago we ordered more often and
    they got to know me. I didn't have to ask for lots of mustard, they
    just tossed it in the bag.

    >i'm not sure what you mean by 'the chinese stuff.'


    The powder sold in Asian markets. At the end of my post there's a
    link to a chowhound thread started by someone with almost my identical
    query. It's not just me and it's has come up here in RFC before also.
    There's never been a posted solution that I've read.

    Here is the original post from cowhound which is exactly what I'm
    looking for:

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Chinese hot mustard--where to find the real deal?

    We just bought a lovely hunk of Chinese bbq pork and I'm bummed about
    having to eat it with the less-than-adequate mustard I've been able to
    buy. When you get bbq pork at a Chinese restaurant, it almost always
    comes with a serving of delicious, sinus-burning HOT mustard. We've
    tried the grocery store brands (Sun Luck, Beaver, etc.) but they just
    aren't the same--mostly, not as hot, but they also have a thicker
    consistency. We haven't had much better luck at an Asian market. I did
    buy some ground mustard there and mix it up myself, and that came
    closer, but it just wasn't the stuff from the restaurants. Does
    anybody know the secret--where to get the stuff the restaurants serve,
    or how to make it from scratch?
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I did find a place online that might possibly be the answer but I sure
    don't know.

    http://tinyurl.com/b3zrlz

    If anyone has any incite I'd love to hear it. I could just go to a
    chinese place and ask them to sell me a bunch of packs but how fun
    would that be?

    Here's the chowhound thread.

    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/547080

    Lou



















  2. #2
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    "Lou Decruss" wrote
    > blake murphy wrote:


    >>> I've tried the Chinese stuff with water and thought it was going to
    >>> taste like the stuff in the packets from take out places. It wasn't
    >>> the same. I read you can use vinegar. I dunno. I'd love to be able
    >>> to make it. I've tried a bunch of different store brands and none


    > I started a new thread because we're pretty far from grilled cheese
    > and I'm selfish and want to lure in anyone who are knowledgable on
    > this. <insert smiley face here>


    Good call. I wasnt reading that thread ;-)

    > True, but it's not like the packets. A different flavor and not as
    > hot.


    There are several types, and not all are 'powdered' so you have to define it
    a bit more? Is the one you like yellow-brown and slightly oily?

    It's made from powdered types (a portion of Wasabi added is not going to be
    amiss) mixed with a thin oil such as peanut or sesame (unroasted sesame this
    time, very mild sesame flavor) and vinegar. The proportions vary with how
    you want it to taste and how runny you want it. I use 1 part vinegar, 3
    parts oil, then powdered mustards (plus wasabi and I like a tiny hot curry
    kick) until the thickness I like.




  3. #3
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On 2009-03-07, Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote:


    > If anyone has any incite I'd love to hear it.


    I know your pain, Lou, and would love to relieve it. I too, am a
    Chinese mustard fan. I love it mixed with mayo and used to top steamed
    asparagus. Alas, I also, have yet to find a good sub for the restaurant
    packets, the store brands being pale imitations. Worse, now being in remote
    Colorado, I'm not likely to find anything anytime soon. The two local
    Chinese restaurants are so bad I don't even have a chance to scarf packets.

    nb


  4. #4
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Mar 7, 7:45 am, Lou Decruss <LouDecr...@biteme.com> wrote:
    > On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 17:15:03 GMT, blake murphy
    >
    > <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > >> I've tried the Chinese stuff with water and thought it was going to
    > >> taste like the stuff in the packets from take out places. It wasn't
    > >> the same. I read you can use vinegar. I dunno. I'd love to be able
    > >> to make it. I've tried a bunch of different store brands and none
    > >> taste like the packets. I've mixed wasabi with water and that was
    > >> acceptable.

    >
    > >> Lou

    >
    > I started a new thread because we're pretty far from grilled cheese
    > and I'm selfish and want to lure in anyone who are knowledgable on
    > this. <insert smiley face here>
    >
    > >have you tried the colman's mustard powder?

    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > >it makes a very snappy mustard.

    >
    > True, but it's not like the packets. A different flavor and not as
    > hot.
    >
    > >(the stuff in the packets from my chinese take-out seem a little
    > >bland to me.)

    >
    > <shrug> I dunno. We don't order out much but whenever we do I always
    > ask for as many packs as they'll give me. There's nothing bland about
    > it. When we were moving a couple years ago we ordered more often and
    > they got to know me. I didn't have to ask for lots of mustard, they
    > just tossed it in the bag.
    >
    > >i'm not sure what you mean by 'the chinese stuff.'

    >
    > The powder sold in Asian markets. At the end of my post there's a
    > link to a chowhound thread started by someone with almost my identical
    > query. It's not just me and it's has come up here in RFC before also.
    > There's never been a posted solution that I've read.
    >
    > Here is the original post from cowhound which is exactly what I'm
    > looking for:
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Chinese hot mustard--where to find the real deal?
    >
    > We just bought a lovely hunk of Chinese bbq pork and I'm bummed about
    > having to eat it with the less-than-adequate mustard I've been able to
    > buy. When you get bbq pork at a Chinese restaurant, it almost always
    > comes with a serving of delicious, sinus-burning HOT mustard. We've
    > tried the grocery store brands (Sun Luck, Beaver, etc.) but they just
    > aren't the same--mostly, not as hot, but they also have a thicker
    > consistency. We haven't had much better luck at an Asian market. I did
    > buy some ground mustard there and mix it up myself, and that came
    > closer, but it just wasn't the stuff from the restaurants. Does
    > anybody know the secret--where to get the stuff the restaurants serve,
    > or how to make it from scratch?
    > -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > I did find a place online that might possibly be the answer but I sure
    > don't know.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/b3zrlz
    >
    > If anyone has any incite I'd love to hear it. I could just go to a
    > chinese place and ask them to sell me a bunch of packs but how fun
    > would that be?
    >
    > Here's the chowhound thread.
    >
    > http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/547080
    >
    > Lou


    Try Penzey's "Oriental Canadian Mustard (Hot)."
    http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penze...ardpowder.html

    A fresh batch of this is generally hotter than the packets from our
    local Chinese place. Use tepid water and let it sit a few minutes
    before using. A dab of oil (use sesame if you like the flavor)
    smooths out the texture.

    --
    Silvar Beitel
    (very occasional poster)

  5. #5
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    cshenk said...

    > There are several types, and not all are 'powdered' so you have to
    > define it a bit more? Is the one you like yellow-brown and slightly
    > oily?
    >
    > It's made from powdered types (a portion of Wasabi added is not going to
    > be amiss) mixed with a thin oil such as peanut or sesame (unroasted
    > sesame this time, very mild sesame flavor) and vinegar. The proportions
    > vary with how you want it to taste and how runny you want it. I use 1
    > part vinegar, 3 parts oil, then powdered mustards (plus wasabi and I
    > like a tiny hot curry kick) until the thickness I like.



    This is a "top secret" clone recipe for Phillipe's I make

    This mustard is so hot, it'll make your scalp sweat!!! Rivals any hot
    Chinese mustard made.

    Hot Mustard Sauce for French Dip Sandwich

    4 Tablespoons dry mustard powder
    1 Tablespoon white wine vinegar
    2 Tablespoons flat beer
    1 clove garlic
    1 teaspoon sugar
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon turmeric
    1 Tablespoon olive oil (optional)

    Whisk together dry mustard, vinegar and beer. Use a garlic press or a large
    pair of pliers to squeeze the juice from the clove of garlic into the
    mixture. Stir in sugar, salt and turmeric. To make smoother and less hot,
    add olive oil to taste.
    (Source given: The Press Enterprise)

  6. #6
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 05:26:27 -0800 (PST), [email protected]
    wrote:

    >"Oriental Canadian


    That sounds interesting.....

    I always have made mind with Coleman's dry and rice wine vinegar.
    (tablespoon dry mustard, six drops or more, liquid)

    For a condiment that is used in small quantities in our house, twice a
    year, there never has been a need to buy it in quart jars.






  7. #7
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query


    <[email protected]> wrote >
    > Try Penzey's "Oriental Canadian Mustard (Hot)."
    > http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penze...ardpowder.html
    >
    > A fresh batch of this is generally hotter than the packets from our
    > local Chinese place. Use tepid water and let it sit a few minutes
    > before using. A dab of oil (use sesame if you like the flavor)
    > smooths out the texture.
    >


    Yes, that's the one. Mix with plain water and allow to sit at room
    temperature (covered) for about an hour, or longer for more heat, then
    refridgerate for up to a month. Never let mustard come into contact with
    metal.



  8. #8
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Mar 7, 4:45*am, Lou Decruss <LouDecr...@biteme.com> wrote:
    > On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 17:15:03 GMT, blake murphy wrote:
    > >> I've tried the Chinese stuff with water and thought it was going to
    > >> taste like the stuff in the packets from take out places. *It wasn't
    > >> the same. I read you can use vinegar. *I dunno. *I'd love to be able
    > >> to make it. *I've tried a bunch of different store brands and none
    > >> taste like the packets. * I've mixed wasabi with water and that was
    > >> acceptable.

    >
    >
    > I started a new thread because we're pretty far from grilled cheese
    > and I'm selfish and want to lure in anyone who are knowledgable on
    > this. <insert smiley face here>
    >

    Here is the Penzey's page for the mustard powders they sell. One of
    them is called "Asian" and they discuss mixing ratios.

    Personally, I use Colman's -- equal amounts of powder and liquid,
    where the liquid is almost all cool water with just a bit of white
    vinegar added. Do this at least an hour before you use it, and cover
    it while it sits. This works for me, but may not replicate the taste
    you guys are looking for. Mustard is very much a "to taste" kind of
    thing. You can add salt, sugar, oil, turmeric (for color) or even
    start by grinding your own mustard seeds. One friend of ours adds a
    tiny bit of sesame oil but I think that's equivalent to flavoring a
    mayonnaise. It's a thing to play around with, not a precise
    formula. -aem

  9. #9
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    [email protected] wrote on Sat, 7 Mar 2009 06:35:28 -0800 (PST):

    > On Mar 7, 4:45 am, Lou Decruss <LouDecr...@biteme.com> wrote:
    >> On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 17:15:03 GMT, blake murphy wrote:
    > >>> I've tried the Chinese stuff with water and thought it was
    > >>> going to taste like the stuff in the packets from take out
    > >>> places. It wasn't the same. I read you can use vinegar.
    > >>> I dunno. I'd love to be able to make it. I've tried a
    > >>> bunch of different store brands and none taste like the
    > >>> packets. I've mixed wasabi with water and that
    > >>> was acceptable.

    >>
    >> I started a new thread because we're pretty far from grilled
    >> cheese and I'm selfish and want to lure in anyone who are
    >> knowledgable on this. <insert smiley face here>
    >>

    > Here is the Penzey's page for the mustard powders they sell.
    > One of them is called "Asian" and they discuss mixing ratios.


    I don't think I have ever come across a mustard hotter than that made
    with water and Colman's mustard powder. You have to wait 30 minutes or
    so for it to develop full intensity and any additions, like vinegar,
    seem to decrease the heat.

    I was interested that some people suggested adding turmeric, which is
    something that Colman's, despite the bright yellow color, does not
    contain.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  10. #10
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query



    Lou Decruss wrote:
    >
    > On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 17:15:03 GMT, blake murphy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >> I've tried the Chinese stuff with water and thought it was going to
    > >> taste like the stuff in the packets from take out places. It wasn't
    > >> the same. I read you can use vinegar. I dunno. I'd love to be able
    > >> to make it. I've tried a bunch of different store brands and none
    > >> taste like the packets. I've mixed wasabi with water and that was
    > >> acceptable.
    > >>
    > >> Lou

    >
    > I started a new thread because we're pretty far from grilled cheese
    > and I'm selfish and want to lure in anyone who are knowledgable on
    > this. <insert smiley face here>
    >
    > >have you tried the colman's mustard powder?

    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > >it makes a very snappy mustard.

    >
    > True, but it's not like the packets. A different flavor and not as
    > hot.
    >
    > >(the stuff in the packets from my chinese take-out seem a little
    > >bland to me.)

    >
    > <shrug> I dunno. We don't order out much but whenever we do I always
    > ask for as many packs as they'll give me. There's nothing bland about
    > it. When we were moving a couple years ago we ordered more often and
    > they got to know me. I didn't have to ask for lots of mustard, they
    > just tossed it in the bag.
    >
    > >i'm not sure what you mean by 'the chinese stuff.'

    >
    > The powder sold in Asian markets. At the end of my post there's a
    > link to a chowhound thread started by someone with almost my identical
    > query. It's not just me and it's has come up here in RFC before also.
    > There's never been a posted solution that I've read.



    Try mixing in a pinch of sugar with your mustard powder and water.
    Whatever mustard powder is used must be fresh; it really does lose
    strength over time.

  11. #11
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query


    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:YQvsl.1819$%[email protected]..
    > [email protected] wrote on Sat, 7 Mar 2009 06:35:28 -0800 (PST):
    >
    >> On Mar 7, 4:45 am, Lou Decruss <LouDecr...@biteme.com> wrote:
    >>> On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 17:15:03 GMT, blake murphy wrote:
    >> >>> I've tried the Chinese stuff with water and thought it was
    >> >>> going to taste like the stuff in the packets from take out
    >> >>> places. It wasn't the same. I read you can use vinegar.
    >> >>> I dunno. I'd love to be able to make it. I've tried a
    >> >>> bunch of different store brands and none taste like the
    >> >>> packets. I've mixed wasabi with water and that
    >> >>> was acceptable.
    >>>
    >>> I started a new thread because we're pretty far from grilled
    >>> cheese and I'm selfish and want to lure in anyone who are
    >>> knowledgable on this. <insert smiley face here>
    >>>

    >> Here is the Penzey's page for the mustard powders they sell.
    >> One of them is called "Asian" and they discuss mixing ratios.

    >
    > I don't think I have ever come across a mustard hotter than that made
    > with water and Colman's mustard powder. You have to wait 30 minutes or so
    > for it to develop full intensity and any additions, like vinegar, seem to
    > decrease the heat.
    >
    > I was interested that some people suggested adding turmeric, which is
    > something that Colman's, despite the bright yellow color, does not
    > contain.
    >
    >

    Turmeric adds no heat and very little flavor... it's used in some mustards
    for that lurid yellow color.

    Coleman's doesn't market a hot Asian style mustard powder. Once you try
    Penzeys you'll know... be very careful... it is mustard plaster HOT! When
    you buy the extra hot version of prepared horseradish that extra heat comes
    from mustard oil. Also some of Coleman's mustard contains wheat flour, just
    a word to the wise. I never buy Coleman's, it's not dated so you have no
    idea how long ago it was ground, and it's very over priced.

    This is one of the better commercial brands of prepared mustard:
    http://www.plochman.com/

    One of my personal favs:
    http://www.plochman.com/productkosc.htm








  12. #12
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 06:35:28 -0800 (PST), [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > Personally, I use Colman's -- equal amounts of powder and liquid,
    > where the liquid is almost all cool water with just a bit of white
    > vinegar added. Do this at least an hour before you use it, and cover
    > it while it sits. This works for me, but may not replicate the taste
    > you guys are looking for. Mustard is very much a "to taste" kind of
    > thing. You can add salt, sugar, oil, turmeric (for color) or even
    > start by grinding your own mustard seeds.


    this last part interests me, as i have a bag of yellow mustard seeds from
    penzeys. have you tried this yourself? do you think a spice grinder will
    get it powdery enough?

    your pal,
    blake

  13. #13
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Mar 7, 9:21*am, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >
    > this last part interests me, as i have a bag of yellow mustard seeds from
    > penzeys. *have you tried this yourself? *do you think a spice grinderwill
    > get it powdery enough?
    >

    Dunno. The only time I did it was to make a kind of grainy Dijon-
    style mustard. I used the spice grinder then and it worked fine for
    that purpose but the procedure and desired end reslut were different.
    You might ask Penzey's. A burr grinder would likely do it, if you had
    one of those lying around. -aem

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 17:21:13 GMT, blake murphy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 06:35:28 -0800 (PST), [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >> Personally, I use Colman's -- equal amounts of powder and liquid,
    >> where the liquid is almost all cool water with just a bit of white
    >> vinegar added. Do this at least an hour before you use it, and cover
    >> it while it sits. This works for me, but may not replicate the taste
    >> you guys are looking for. Mustard is very much a "to taste" kind of
    >> thing. You can add salt, sugar, oil, turmeric (for color) or even
    >> start by grinding your own mustard seeds.

    >
    >this last part interests me, as i have a bag of yellow mustard seeds from
    >penzeys. have you tried this yourself? do you think a spice grinder will
    >get it powdery enough?
    >


    Coleman's is too inexpensive to waste your time grinding seeds into
    powder and whole mustard seeds are good for making a grainy mustard.
    Have you found this site, blake?
    http://www.melborponsti.com/inxmtd.html


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  15. #15
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 06:45:56 -0600, Lou Decruss wrote:

    > On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 17:15:03 GMT, blake murphy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> I've tried the Chinese stuff with water and thought it was going to
    >>> taste like the stuff in the packets from take out places. It wasn't
    >>> the same. I read you can use vinegar. I dunno. I'd love to be able
    >>> to make it. I've tried a bunch of different store brands and none
    >>> taste like the packets. I've mixed wasabi with water and that was
    >>> acceptable.
    >>>
    >>> Lou

    >
    > I started a new thread because we're pretty far from grilled cheese
    > and I'm selfish and want to lure in anyone who are knowledgable on
    > this. <insert smiley face here>
    >
    >>have you tried the colman's mustard powder?

    >
    > Yes.


    i should have guessed you had.
    >
    >>it makes a very snappy mustard.

    >
    > True, but it's not like the packets. A different flavor and not as
    > hot.
    >
    >>(the stuff in the packets from my chinese take-out seem a little
    >>bland to me.)

    >
    > <shrug> I dunno. We don't order out much but whenever we do I always
    > ask for as many packs as they'll give me. There's nothing bland about
    > it. When we were moving a couple years ago we ordered more often and
    > they got to know me. I didn't have to ask for lots of mustard, they
    > just tossed it in the bag.
    >


    your take-out joint must be better than mine, then. as i recall, their
    mustard packets list guar gum or some such as an ingredient.

    >>i'm not sure what you mean by 'the chinese stuff.'

    >
    > The powder sold in Asian markets.


    i thought that's what you meant but i wasn't sure.

    >At the end of my post there's a
    > link to a chowhound thread started by someone with almost my identical
    > query. It's not just me and it's has come up here in RFC before also.
    > There's never been a posted solution that I've read.
    >
    > Here is the original post from cowhound which is exactly what I'm
    > looking for:

    <snip>

    >If anyone has any incite I'd love to hear it. I could just go to a
    >chinese place and ask them to sell me a bunch of packs but how fun
    >would that be?


    at least if you fail in your quest there is a plan b.

    > http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/547080
    >
    > Lou


    this advice from the chowhound thread strikes me as being sound:

    S&B is a reliable canned (4 oz) brand. Avoid jarred pre-made asian
    mustards.

    Activate with a minimum of water only, in a cup, to make a thick non-runny
    paste (think wasabi paste), then Turn It Over onto a saucer, so that no
    fumes escape. Give it an hour to activate. Then turn it over and breathe
    the fumes to calibrate the nose hit that you shall surely receive.Then
    hydrate to the viscosity desired.

    This is how mustard was served daily at my local ramen shop: made daily,
    sitting there as an inverted cup on a vapor sealing saucer.

    ....it sounds like a lot of trouble, though. but i find the powder and
    water thing (provided you let it develop) is hot enough. i guess you could
    try incorporating some wasabi powder into the mix. might look funny,
    though.

    your pal,
    blake

  16. #16
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    blake wrote on Sat, 07 Mar 2009 17:47:20 GMT:

    > This is how mustard was served daily at my local ramen shop: made
    > daily, sitting there as an inverted cup on a vapor sealing
    > saucer.


    > ...it sounds like a lot of trouble, though. but i find the
    > powder and water thing (provided you let it develop) is hot
    > enough. i guess you could try incorporating some wasabi
    > powder into the mix. might look funny, though.


    Even the Japanese use English (essentially) mustard and a fruity ketchup
    on Tonkatsu (deep fried pork cutlet). There's no hope for the Japanese
    of course, they refuse to be stubbornly ethnically pure :-)

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  17. #17
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 08:00:55 -0500, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Lou Decruss" wrote
    >> blake murphy wrote:

    >
    >>>> I've tried the Chinese stuff with water and thought it was going to
    >>>> taste like the stuff in the packets from take out places. It wasn't
    >>>> the same. I read you can use vinegar. I dunno. I'd love to be able
    >>>> to make it. I've tried a bunch of different store brands and none

    >
    >> I started a new thread because we're pretty far from grilled cheese
    >> and I'm selfish and want to lure in anyone who are knowledgable on
    >> this. <insert smiley face here>

    >
    >Good call. I wasnt reading that thread ;-)


    Thanks for the reply. You were one the posters I was interested in
    hearing from.

    >> True, but it's not like the packets. A different flavor and not as
    >> hot.

    >
    >There are several types, and not all are 'powdered' so you have to define it
    >a bit more? Is the one you like yellow-brown and slightly oily?


    Yes it's yellow-brown but I didn't know it had oil in it. This
    learning stuff is pretty cool.
    >
    >It's made from powdered types (a portion of Wasabi added is not going to be
    >amiss) mixed with a thin oil such as peanut or sesame (unroasted sesame this
    >time, very mild sesame flavor) and vinegar. The proportions vary with how
    >you want it to taste and how runny you want it. I use 1 part vinegar, 3
    >parts oil, then powdered mustards (plus wasabi and I like a tiny hot curry
    >kick) until the thickness I like.


    The stuff I've had and love is pretty runny. The wasabi is a route
    I'll play with. I'm saving this thread and I'll do some experimenting
    in dixie cups and see what I come up with.

    Thanks much!

    Lou

  18. #18
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 13:24:36 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2009-03-07, Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> If anyone has any incite I'd love to hear it.

    >
    >I know your pain, Lou, and would love to relieve it. I too, am a
    >Chinese mustard fan. I love it mixed with mayo and used to top steamed
    >asparagus. Alas, I also, have yet to find a good sub for the restaurant
    >packets, the store brands being pale imitations. Worse, now being in remote
    >Colorado, I'm not likely to find anything anytime soon. The two local
    >Chinese restaurants are so bad I don't even have a chance to scarf packets.


    Hopefully with the help of the pro's here we can solve our problem.
    Louise knows I love the stuff and came home from a store closing
    discount sale with a jar of mustard with a brand name of "tasty Joy."
    I'm really wondering if she's figured out how to access usenet. Dora
    says she just reads my mind. <shrug> Anyway I've had tasty joy
    before and it's not the same thing.

    Lou

  19. #19
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 05:26:27 -0800 (PST), silverbeetl[email protected]
    wrote:

    >Try Penzey's "Oriental Canadian Mustard (Hot)."
    >http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penze...ardpowder.html
    >
    >A fresh batch of this is generally hotter than the packets from our
    >local Chinese place. Use tepid water and let it sit a few minutes
    >before using. A dab of oil (use sesame if you like the flavor)
    >smooths out the texture.
    >
    >--
    >Silvar Beitel
    >(very occasional poster)


    Thanks Silvar. I've been to Penzeys many times and somehow missed
    this. It may or may not be the answer, but worth a try.

    Lou

  20. #20
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Hot Mustard Query

    On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 09:26:49 -0500, Mr. Bill <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 05:26:27 -0800 (PST), [email protected]
    >wrote:
    >
    >>"Oriental Canadian

    >
    >That sounds interesting.....
    >
    >I always have made mind with Coleman's dry and rice wine vinegar.
    >(tablespoon dry mustard, six drops or more, liquid)
    >
    >For a condiment that is used in small quantities in our house, twice a
    >year, there never has been a need to buy it in quart jars.


    I dunno about quart jars but if I could make what I'm looking for I'd
    use it often.

    Lou

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32