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Thread: Chinese Ginger Scallion OIl

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Chinese Ginger Scallion OIl

    Blake posted this to another group a bunch of months ago and I was
    wondering if anyone was familiar with it and has made it. It's fairly
    popular from what I hear, but I've never experienced it that I recall.

    <http://www.salon.com/food/francis_lam/2010/06/18/ginger_scallion_sauce_recipe/index.html>

    For those that have made it, how important is it to get the oil all
    the way up the smoking point? We're talking about 450F to 500F here.

    And would it be safe to make a double batch of this without burning
    the ginger/scallion mixture? A cup of oil will retain it's heat much
    longer than a half a cup, is my thinking.

    -sw

  2. #2
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Ginger Scallion OIl

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Blake posted this to another group a bunch of months ago and I was
    >wondering if anyone was familiar with it and has made it. It's fairly
    >popular from what I hear, but I've never experienced it that I recall.
    >
    ><http://www.salon.com/food/francis_lam/2010/06/18/ginger_scallion_sauce_recipe/index.html>
    >


    Something there concerned bitdefender & launched a popup past my
    blocker.

    >For those that have made it, how important is it to get the oil all
    >the way up the smoking point? We're talking about 450F to 500F here.


    I can't imagine it does anything but speed up the process [and would
    think at a loss of some flavors] especially since he says "you can
    just mix the ingredients together, like Chang does, and let their
    flavors come out over time"

    >
    >And would it be safe to make a double batch of this without burning
    >the ginger/scallion mixture? A cup of oil will retain it's heat much
    >longer than a half a cup, is my thinking.


    There isn't a whole lot of time or ingredients to risk by trying it.
    Do 2 batches and see if you can tell the diff. give your least
    favorite to your neighbor.

    Note that one of the comments says to cover the scallions with the
    ginger so the ginger takes the hottest oil. I suppose that makes some
    sense.

    I might do a batch with the 'over time' method--

    Gotta say, though this is pretty, it isn't all that helpful;
    "3.Salt the ginger and scallion like they called your mother a bad
    name and stir it well. Taste it. It won't taste good because that much
    raw ginger and scallion doesn't really taste good, but pay attention
    to the saltiness. You want it to be just a little too salty to be
    pleasant, because you have to account for all the oil you're about to
    add."

    I understand that the potency of the ginger and scallion, and personal
    taste, vary. So you can't say "1/2tsp" and be done with it. But it
    would help if he said 'I usually end up with 3-4 cups of salt'.

    Is this supposed to be soy sauce, or nuoc mam salty? That's where my
    instincts are pointing me.

    Jim

  3. #3
    George Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Ginger Scallion OIl

    On 5/18/2011 7:24 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
    > Sqwertz<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Blake posted this to another group a bunch of months ago and I was
    >> wondering if anyone was familiar with it and has made it. It's fairly
    >> popular from what I hear, but I've never experienced it that I recall.
    >>
    >> <http://www.salon.com/food/francis_lam/2010/06/18/ginger_scallion_sauce_recipe/index.html>
    >>

    >
    > Something there concerned bitdefender& launched a popup past my
    > blocker.
    >
    >> For those that have made it, how important is it to get the oil all
    >> the way up the smoking point? We're talking about 450F to 500F here.

    >
    > I can't imagine it does anything but speed up the process [and would
    > think at a loss of some flavors] especially since he says "you can
    > just mix the ingredients together, like Chang does, and let their
    > flavors come out over time"
    >
    >>
    >> And would it be safe to make a double batch of this without burning
    >> the ginger/scallion mixture? A cup of oil will retain it's heat much
    >> longer than a half a cup, is my thinking.

    >
    > There isn't a whole lot of time or ingredients to risk by trying it.
    > Do 2 batches and see if you can tell the diff. give your least
    > favorite to your neighbor.
    >
    > Note that one of the comments says to cover the scallions with the
    > ginger so the ginger takes the hottest oil. I suppose that makes some
    > sense.
    >
    > I might do a batch with the 'over time' method--
    >
    > Gotta say, though this is pretty, it isn't all that helpful;
    > "3.Salt the ginger and scallion like they called your mother a bad
    > name and stir it well. Taste it. It won't taste good because that much
    > raw ginger and scallion doesn't really taste good, but pay attention
    > to the saltiness. You want it to be just a little too salty to be
    > pleasant, because you have to account for all the oil you're about to
    > add."
    >
    > I understand that the potency of the ginger and scallion, and personal
    > taste, vary. So you can't say "1/2tsp" and be done with it. But it
    > would help if he said 'I usually end up with 3-4 cups of salt'.
    >
    > Is this supposed to be soy sauce, or nuoc mam salty? That's where my
    > instincts are pointing me.
    >
    > Jim


    I have been in a number of restaurants that have this as a table
    condiment and it isn't very salty. I have made both the cooked and
    uncooked versions and I like the cooked better.

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Chinese Ginger Scallion OIl

    On Wed, 18 May 2011 07:24:17 -0400, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >><http://www.salon.com/food/francis_lam/2010/06/18/ginger_scallion_sauce_recipe/index.html>

    ....
    >>And would it be safe to make a double batch of this without burning
    >>the ginger/scallion mixture? A cup of oil will retain it's heat much
    >>longer than a half a cup, is my thinking.

    >
    > There isn't a whole lot of time or ingredients to risk by trying it.
    > Do 2 batches and see if you can tell the diff. give your least
    > favorite to your neighbor.


    Good point. I just checked my corn oil supply and it can't make a
    double batch anyway.

    > Is this supposed to be soy sauce, or nuoc mam salty? That's where my
    > instincts are pointing me.


    I thinking about a teaspoon of salt, maybe a tad more.

    -sw

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