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Thread: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

  1. #1
    isw Guest

    Default Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    I'm an old Southern boy, and so naturally I like chicken-fried steak,
    which these days (far from my Southern "boyhood") I cook only rarely --
    partly because the others in the family are culinary barbarians who
    won't touch it. Anyhow, one problem is that no matter how much I try to
    tenderize the (already cubed) beef, it winds up tasty but tough.

    I've been fiddling around with sous vide cooking for some months, and it
    occurred to me to combine the two and see what would happen.

    Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not pound
    it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck it in a
    vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This evening, a good
    24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did the flour-egg-flour
    thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The fact that the meat was
    already cooked meant that I could fry it pretty hot to get a nice brown
    crust without having to worry about whether the middle was done too.

    Anyhow, the experiment was a success. The beef had a crispy crust, and
    was fork tender -- not "melt-in-your-mouth", but certainly a lot moreso
    than with my previous prep method.

    Since there isn't any real effort involved in the 24 hour sous vide
    part, I will be doing it that way again. I may try something like 48
    hours at about 130 F -- that might get me a tender, *rare* CFS, which
    would be an interesting thing indeed.

    Isaac

  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    isw <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not pound
    >it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck it in a
    >vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This evening, a good
    >24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did the flour-egg-flour
    >thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The fact that the meat was
    >already cooked meant that I could fry it pretty hot to get a nice brown
    >crust without having to worry about whether the middle was done too.
    >
    >Anyhow, the experiment was a success. The beef had a crispy crust, and
    >was fork tender -- not "melt-in-your-mouth", but certainly a lot moreso
    >than with my previous prep method.
    >
    >Since there isn't any real effort involved in the 24 hour sous vide
    >part, I will be doing it that way again. I may try something like 48
    >hours at about 130 F -- that might get me a tender, *rare* CFS, which
    >would be an interesting thing indeed.


    Thanks for the report.

    Have you ever made CFS with rib steak (rather than cubed steak)?
    Would that be another possibility for the sous vide treatment?

    Steve

  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On Fri, 1 Jul 2011 05:18:41 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    Pope) wrote:

    > isw <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not pound
    > >it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck it in a
    > >vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This evening, a good
    > >24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did the flour-egg-flour
    > >thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The fact that the meat was
    > >already cooked meant that I could fry it pretty hot to get a nice brown
    > >crust without having to worry about whether the middle was done too.
    > >
    > >Anyhow, the experiment was a success. The beef had a crispy crust, and
    > >was fork tender -- not "melt-in-your-mouth", but certainly a lot moreso
    > >than with my previous prep method.
    > >
    > >Since there isn't any real effort involved in the 24 hour sous vide
    > >part, I will be doing it that way again. I may try something like 48
    > >hours at about 130 F -- that might get me a tender, *rare* CFS, which
    > >would be an interesting thing indeed.

    >
    > Thanks for the report.
    >
    > Have you ever made CFS with rib steak (rather than cubed steak)?
    > Would that be another possibility for the sous vide treatment?
    >

    First boiled chicken fried steak and now breaded, boiled and fried rib
    eye? Stop the madness!

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  4. #4
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > isw <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not
    >> pound it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck
    >> it in a vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This
    >> evening, a good 24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did
    >> the flour-egg-flour thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The
    >> fact that the meat was already cooked meant that I could fry it
    >> pretty hot to get a nice brown crust without having to worry about
    >> whether the middle was done too.
    >>
    >> Anyhow, the experiment was a success. The beef had a crispy crust,
    >> and was fork tender -- not "melt-in-your-mouth", but certainly a lot
    >> moreso than with my previous prep method.
    >>
    >> Since there isn't any real effort involved in the 24 hour sous vide
    >> part, I will be doing it that way again. I may try something like 48
    >> hours at about 130 F -- that might get me a tender, *rare* CFS, which
    >> would be an interesting thing indeed.

    >
    > Thanks for the report.
    >
    > Have you ever made CFS with rib steak (rather than cubed steak)?
    > Would that be another possibility for the sous vide treatment?
    >
    > Steve


    I always made chicken fried steak with pounded round steak. It wasn't tough
    at all.



  5. #5
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 22:14:58 -0700, isw wrote:

    > I'm an old Southern boy, and so naturally I like chicken-fried steak,
    > which these days (far from my Southern "boyhood") I cook only rarely --
    > partly because the others in the family are culinary barbarians who
    > won't touch it. Anyhow, one problem is that no matter how much I try to
    > tenderize the (already cubed) beef, it winds up tasty but tough.
    >
    > I've been fiddling around with sous vide cooking for some months, and it
    > occurred to me to combine the two and see what would happen.
    >
    > Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not pound
    > it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck it in a
    > vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This evening, a good
    > 24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did the flour-egg-flour
    > thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The fact that the meat was
    > already cooked meant that I could fry it pretty hot to get a nice brown
    > crust without having to worry about whether the middle was done too.
    >
    > Anyhow, the experiment was a success. The beef had a crispy crust, and
    > was fork tender -- not "melt-in-your-mouth", but certainly a lot moreso
    > than with my previous prep method.


    The problem with cube steak is that you never know what cut of meat it
    is for sure. It's usually going to be round which is pretty
    universally tough, but even round has it's good moments. So it's
    kinda unfair to base a conclusion on one cubed steak.

    Much of the reason that CFS is so tough is that it is cooked too quick
    and it seizes up the meat muscle which is especially bad for
    traditional round. If I cook CFS at home, which is rare, why not
    spend the extra $1.50 and get a thin slice of ribeye or even strip and
    use that instead of some cheap round? Tastes better and is more
    convenient than going Modernist on one of the most notoriously cheap
    dishes known to mankind. IMO, at least.

    I don't think I've seen cubed steak since I left California, come to
    think of it. And I live in CFS territory.

    -sw

  6. #6
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > Much of the reason that CFS is so tough is that it is cooked too
    > quick
    > and it seizes up the meat muscle which is especially bad for
    > traditional round. If I cook CFS at home, which is rare, why not
    > spend the extra $1.50 and get a thin slice of ribeye or even strip
    > and
    > use that instead of some cheap round? Tastes better and is more
    > convenient than going Modernist on one of the most notoriously cheap
    > dishes known to mankind. IMO, at least.
    >
    > I don't think I've seen cubed steak since I left California, come to
    > think of it. And I live in CFS territory.
    >
    > -sw


    I couldn't agree more. When we were on a really tight, almost
    nonexistent, budget I bought plenty of cubed steak and it was always
    tough. Buy a thin piece of real steak - you'd enjoy the meal, rather
    than throwing your money away on something tough.

    Dora



  7. #7
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On Jul 1, 12:14*am, isw <i...@witzend.com> wrote:
    > I'm an old Southern boy, and so naturally I like chicken-fried steak,
    > which these days (far from my Southern "boyhood") I cook only rarely --
    > partly because the others in the family are culinary barbarians who
    > won't touch it. Anyhow, one problem is that no matter how much I try to
    > tenderize the (already cubed) beef, it winds up tasty but tough.
    >
    > I've been fiddling around with sous vide cooking for some months, and it
    > occurred to me to combine the two and see what would happen.
    >
    > Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not pound
    > it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck it in a
    > vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This evening, a good
    > 24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did the flour-egg-flour
    > thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The fact that the meat was
    > already cooked meant that I could fry it pretty hot to get a nice brown
    > crust without having to worry about whether the middle was done too.
    >

    I love Chicken fried steak, but my issue is getting the flour nice and
    crispy brown w/o overcooking the inside. I don't want it past medium.
    >
    > Isaac


    --Bryan

  8. #8
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On Jul 1, 5:35*am, "Janet" <boxh...@maine.rr.com> wrote:
    > Steve Pope wrote:
    > > isw *<i...@witzend.com> wrote:

    >
    > >> Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not
    > >> pound it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck
    > >> it in a vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This
    > >> evening, a good 24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did
    > >> the flour-egg-flour thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The
    > >> fact that the meat was already cooked meant that I could fry it
    > >> pretty hot to get a nice brown crust without having to worry about
    > >> whether the middle was done too.

    >
    > >> Anyhow, the experiment was a success. The beef had a crispy crust,
    > >> and was fork tender -- not "melt-in-your-mouth", but certainly a lot
    > >> moreso than with my previous prep method.

    >
    > >> Since there isn't any real effort involved in the 24 hour sous vide
    > >> part, I will be doing it that way again. I may try something like 48
    > >> hours at about 130 F -- that might get me a tender, *rare* CFS, which
    > >> would be an interesting thing indeed.

    >
    > > Thanks for the report.

    >
    > > Have you ever made CFS with rib steak (rather than cubed steak)?
    > > Would that be another possibility for the sous vide treatment?

    >
    > > Steve

    >
    > I always made chicken fried steak with pounded round steak. It wasn't tough
    > at all.


    Ya...use round for sure.

  9. #9
    isw Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    In article
    <6ffe38dd-be66-409d-8ecf-024f296ebd24@j31g2000yqe[email protected]>,
    Bryan <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Jul 1, 12:14*am, isw <i...@witzend.com> wrote:
    > > I'm an old Southern boy, and so naturally I like chicken-fried steak,
    > > which these days (far from my Southern "boyhood") I cook only rarely --
    > > partly because the others in the family are culinary barbarians who
    > > won't touch it. Anyhow, one problem is that no matter how much I try to
    > > tenderize the (already cubed) beef, it winds up tasty but tough.
    > >
    > > I've been fiddling around with sous vide cooking for some months, and it
    > > occurred to me to combine the two and see what would happen.
    > >
    > > Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not pound
    > > it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck it in a
    > > vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This evening, a good
    > > 24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did the flour-egg-flour
    > > thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The fact that the meat was
    > > already cooked meant that I could fry it pretty hot to get a nice brown
    > > crust without having to worry about whether the middle was done too.
    > >

    > I love Chicken fried steak, but my issue is getting the flour nice and
    > crispy brown w/o overcooking the inside. I don't want it past medium.



    And sous vide takes care of that perfectly, because it totally separates
    the "crispy outside" part from the "properly done inside" part.

    Isaac

  10. #10
    isw Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 22:14:58 -0700, isw wrote:
    >
    > > I'm an old Southern boy, and so naturally I like chicken-fried steak,
    > > which these days (far from my Southern "boyhood") I cook only rarely --
    > > partly because the others in the family are culinary barbarians who
    > > won't touch it. Anyhow, one problem is that no matter how much I try to
    > > tenderize the (already cubed) beef, it winds up tasty but tough.
    > >
    > > I've been fiddling around with sous vide cooking for some months, and it
    > > occurred to me to combine the two and see what would happen.
    > >
    > > Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not pound
    > > it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck it in a
    > > vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This evening, a good
    > > 24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did the flour-egg-flour
    > > thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The fact that the meat was
    > > already cooked meant that I could fry it pretty hot to get a nice brown
    > > crust without having to worry about whether the middle was done too.
    > >
    > > Anyhow, the experiment was a success. The beef had a crispy crust, and
    > > was fork tender -- not "melt-in-your-mouth", but certainly a lot moreso
    > > than with my previous prep method.

    >
    > The problem with cube steak is that you never know what cut of meat it
    > is for sure. It's usually going to be round which is pretty
    > universally tough, but even round has it's good moments. So it's
    > kinda unfair to base a conclusion on one cubed steak.


    Well, I buy them from the same meat market every time - and it's one
    where I can point to what I want and have a real person wrap it up for
    me.

    > Much of the reason that CFS is so tough is that it is cooked too quick
    > and it seizes up the meat muscle which is especially bad for
    > traditional round.


    Yup. But the sous vide treatment tenderizes it very nicely while still
    leaving it pink (or whatever you like) all the way through.

    > If I cook CFS at home, which is rare, why not
    > spend the extra $1.50 and get a thin slice of ribeye or even strip and
    > use that instead of some cheap round?


    I agree, sort of, but this was, after all an experiment. But, there's a
    pretty good argument to be made that tender beef is less flavorful.

    > I don't think I've seen cubed steak since I left California, come to
    > think of it. And I live in CFS territory.



    Well, I live in Silicon Valley. I grew up in Arkansas, but I left so
    long ago that I really have no idea what was available in grocery stores
    there, then or now. And my mom was just not all that good a cook -- her
    CFS was not crispy, was tough as shoeleather, and was served without
    gravy.

    Isaac

  11. #11
    isw Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dora" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    > > Much of the reason that CFS is so tough is that it is cooked too
    > > quick
    > > and it seizes up the meat muscle which is especially bad for
    > > traditional round. If I cook CFS at home, which is rare, why not
    > > spend the extra $1.50 and get a thin slice of ribeye or even strip
    > > and
    > > use that instead of some cheap round? Tastes better and is more
    > > convenient than going Modernist on one of the most notoriously cheap
    > > dishes known to mankind. IMO, at least.
    > >
    > > I don't think I've seen cubed steak since I left California, come to
    > > think of it. And I live in CFS territory.
    > >
    > > -sw

    >
    > I couldn't agree more. When we were on a really tight, almost
    > nonexistent, budget I bought plenty of cubed steak and it was always
    > tough. Buy a thin piece of real steak - you'd enjoy the meal, rather
    > than throwing your money away on something tough.


    Well, what I did was certainly tasty enough -- and as I said, it
    certainly was not tough. I may try the same thing with a slab of
    flatiron steak -- that's a lot more tender to start out with. But I'll
    still give it about 24 hours in the water bath.

    Isaac

  12. #12
    isw Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    In article <iujlbh$vs6$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:

    > isw <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not pound
    > >it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck it in a
    > >vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This evening, a good
    > >24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did the flour-egg-flour
    > >thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The fact that the meat was
    > >already cooked meant that I could fry it pretty hot to get a nice brown
    > >crust without having to worry about whether the middle was done too.
    > >
    > >Anyhow, the experiment was a success. The beef had a crispy crust, and
    > >was fork tender -- not "melt-in-your-mouth", but certainly a lot moreso
    > >than with my previous prep method.
    > >
    > >Since there isn't any real effort involved in the 24 hour sous vide
    > >part, I will be doing it that way again. I may try something like 48
    > >hours at about 130 F -- that might get me a tender, *rare* CFS, which
    > >would be an interesting thing indeed.

    >
    > Thanks for the report.
    >
    > Have you ever made CFS with rib steak (rather than cubed steak)?


    No, but I may try.

    > Would that be another possibility for the sous vide treatment?


    Essentially, you can cook anything sous vide. I've only done a handful
    of things that way, but my impression is that it does nothing that you
    couldn't do some other way provided you were a very, very good cook who
    was totally familiar with the stove and oven you had to work with. Sous
    vide just lets a less experienced cook achieve the same result.

    What it does (for meat, at any rate), is take all the guesswork out of
    the process. It totally separates "cooking until tender" from "cooking
    just to medium-rare (or whatever)".

    Whether you keep a piece of meat in the water bath at 130 F for one,
    ten, or thirty, hours, when you take it out it will still be rare to
    medium-rare, and pink all the way through. What else it will do, is let
    the meat get more and more tender, as all the tough parts dissolve.

    Isaac

  13. #13
    isw Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 1 Jul 2011 05:18:41 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    > Pope) wrote:
    >
    > > isw <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not pound
    > > >it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck it in a
    > > >vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This evening, a good
    > > >24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did the flour-egg-flour
    > > >thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The fact that the meat was
    > > >already cooked meant that I could fry it pretty hot to get a nice brown
    > > >crust without having to worry about whether the middle was done too.
    > > >
    > > >Anyhow, the experiment was a success. The beef had a crispy crust, and
    > > >was fork tender -- not "melt-in-your-mouth", but certainly a lot moreso
    > > >than with my previous prep method.
    > > >
    > > >Since there isn't any real effort involved in the 24 hour sous vide
    > > >part, I will be doing it that way again. I may try something like 48
    > > >hours at about 130 F -- that might get me a tender, *rare* CFS, which
    > > >would be an interesting thing indeed.

    > >
    > > Thanks for the report.
    > >
    > > Have you ever made CFS with rib steak (rather than cubed steak)?
    > > Would that be another possibility for the sous vide treatment?
    > >

    > First boiled chicken fried steak and now breaded, boiled and fried rib
    > eye? Stop the madness!


    Um, if you think that cooking sous vide is in any way similar to
    "boiling", well, you have a bit more research to do ...

    Isaac

  14. #14
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On 2011-07-02, isw <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Um, if you think that cooking sous vide is in any way similar to
    > "boiling", well, you have a bit more research to do ...


    What I think is, douche vid isn't even really cooking. More like
    rapid putrefaction! Making a CFS from something that's rotted in a
    hot tub fer a day and a half sounds jes plain creepy. I'll stick to
    frying, thank you.

    nb



  15. #15
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On Jul 2, 1:22*am, isw <i...@witzend.com> wrote:
    > In article
    > <6ffe38dd-be66-409d-8ecf-024f296eb...@j31g2000yqe.googlegroups.com>,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > *Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > On Jul 1, 12:14 am, isw <i...@witzend.com> wrote:
    > > > I'm an old Southern boy, and so naturally I like chicken-fried steak,
    > > > which these days (far from my Southern "boyhood") I cook only rarely --
    > > > partly because the others in the family are culinary barbarians who
    > > > won't touch it. Anyhow, one problem is that no matter how much I try to
    > > > tenderize the (already cubed) beef, it winds up tasty but tough.

    >
    > > > I've been fiddling around with sous vide cooking for some months, andit
    > > > occurred to me to combine the two and see what would happen.

    >
    > > > Yesterday, I seasoned a piece of cubed beef (note that I did not pound
    > > > it or otherwise attempt to further tenderize it at all), stuck it in a
    > > > vacuum bag, and dropped it in a 145 F water bath. This evening, a good
    > > > 24 hours later, I pulled it out, blotted it dry, did the flour-egg-flour
    > > > thing, and pan-fried it quickly in hot oil. The fact that the meat was
    > > > already cooked meant that I could fry it pretty hot to get a nice brown
    > > > crust without having to worry about whether the middle was done too.

    >
    > > I love Chicken fried steak, but my issue is getting the flour nice and
    > > crispy brown w/o overcooking the inside. *I don't want it past medium..

    >
    > And sous vide takes care of that perfectly, because it totally separates
    > the "crispy outside" part from the "properly done inside" part.


    But I don't consider the inside having been cooked to 145F to be
    "properly done."
    >
    > Isaac


    --Bryan

  16. #16
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On Jul 1, 10:02*am, "Dora" <limey...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    > > Much of the reason that CFS is so tough is that it is cooked too
    > > quick
    > > and it seizes up the meat muscle which is especially bad for
    > > traditional round. *If I cook CFS at home, which is rare, why not
    > > spend the extra $1.50 and get a thin slice of ribeye or even strip
    > > and
    > > use that instead of some cheap round? *Tastes better and is more
    > > convenient than going Modernist on one of the most notoriously cheap
    > > dishes known to mankind. *IMO, at least.

    >
    > > I don't think I've seen cubed steak since I left California, come to
    > > think of it. *And I live in CFS territory.


    Cube steak can be pretty inexpensive, and ribeye has too much fat to
    be good for CFS.
    >
    > > -sw

    >
    > I couldn't agree more. *When we were on a really tight, almost
    > nonexistent, budget I bought plenty of cubed steak and it was always
    > tough. *Buy a thin piece of real steak - you'd enjoy the meal, rather
    > than throwing your money away on something tough.


    You can certainly make it with sirloin by beating it with a hammer:
    http://www.butcher-packer.com/index....roducts_id=198

    The cubing process allows more flour to adhere
    >
    > Dora


    --Bryan

  17. #17
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On Fri, 01 Jul 2011 23:42:17 -0700, isw <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Um, if you think that cooking sous vide is in any way similar to
    > "boiling", well, you have a bit more research to do ...


    They're drowning food in hot water. Oh, yeah. It's in a bag. Just
    like boil in bag frozen vegetables. Wow, whatta concept.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On Fri, 01 Jul 2011 23:32:11 -0700, isw wrote:

    > Well, what I did was certainly tasty enough -- and as I said, it
    > certainly was not tough. I may try the same thing with a slab of
    > flatiron steak -- that's a lot more tender to start out with. But I'll
    > still give it about 24 hours in the water bath.


    I saw something on TV that claimed that flatiron/top blade was the
    second most tender piece of meat on the animal. I kinda have my
    doubts.

    -sw

  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On Sat, 2 Jul 2011 07:03:10 -0700 (PDT), Bryan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Cube steak can be pretty inexpensive, and ribeye has too much fat to
    > be good for CFS.


    So they use cube steak for chicken fried steak?

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  20. #20
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Chicken-fried steak sous vide

    On Fri, 01 Jul 2011 23:29:58 -0700, isw wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> If I cook CFS at home, which is rare, why not
    >> spend the extra $1.50 and get a thin slice of ribeye or even strip and
    >> use that instead of some cheap round?

    >
    > I agree, sort of, but this was, after all an experiment. But, there's a
    > pretty good argument to be made that tender beef is less flavorful.


    I didn't mean to dis your ingenuity or sacrifice in the name of
    science. Lord knows I do a lot of experimentation myself.

    Is it reall y necessary to keep a piece of meat at 130F for 48 hours?
    Wouldn't it come up to temp within 8 hours (assuming circulating
    water) or does it benefit somehow from being held at that temperature
    for that long a period?

    >> I don't think I've seen cubed steak since I left California, come to
    >> think of it. And I live in CFS territory.

    >
    > Well, I live in Silicon Valley.


    That's the last place I remember buying it. I also remember that I
    could have any piece of meat out there on display cubed for the
    asking. Up to 1.5" thick. But I like pounding beter. It hacks up
    the meat less and doesn't give it that hamburger taste/texture as
    much.

    -sw

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