Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Chicken broth question

  1. #1
    Paco Guest

    Default Chicken broth question

    After poaching chicken for chicken salad, for example, the resulting broth
    gets strained, packaged and frozen for another future use, soup or for use
    as a poaching liquid again. Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain? I don't
    think food safety issues come into play, rather quality issues. And yes, I
    know, "Try it and let us know how it turns out." But I'm guessing that
    somebody here would have experience in this matter and might be willing to
    share.

    --

    "It's funny until someone gets hurt - then it's frikkin' hilarious!"


  2. #2
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question


    "Paco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ht9jag$6jc$[email protected]..
    > After poaching chicken for chicken salad, for example, the resulting broth
    > gets strained, packaged and frozen for another future use, soup or for use
    > as a poaching liquid again. Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    > frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain? I
    > don't think food safety issues come into play, rather quality issues. And
    > yes, I know, "Try it and let us know how it turns out." But I'm guessing
    > that somebody here would have experience in this matter and might be
    > willing to share.


    I'd not reuse it a scond time. Just my thing. You can freeze stock in ice
    cube trays then store in Ziplock bags. That way you only use what you need.
    Do date the bag. You don't want to store it for more than 6 months or so
    lest ot lose flavor.

    Paul



  3. #3
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    On May 22, 2:45 pm, "Paco" <n...@thank.you> wrote:
    > After poaching chicken for chicken salad, for example, the resulting broth
    > gets strained, packaged and frozen for another future use, soup or for use
    > as a poaching liquid again. Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    > frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain?


    In my opinion, poaching chicken and making broth are opposing
    endeavors. If you've poached the chicken for chicken salad the
    resulting broth should have minimal chicken flavor and won't merit
    saving or reusing. You've made every effort to keep all the flavor
    and goodies in the chicken, not extracted it into the liquid, so enjoy
    the chicken. If later you want soup or to poach some more chicken,
    start over.

    This is the other side of the coin when you hear people say they make
    chicken broth/stock and use the chicken for salad or pot pie or a la
    king. Well, if they've done a good job of making broth the chicken
    should be dead and tasteless because all the flavor and goodness has
    been extracted.

    My opinion, since you asked. -aem





  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    On Sat, 22 May 2010 17:45:49 -0400, "Paco" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > After poaching chicken for chicken salad, for example, the resulting broth
    > gets strained, packaged and frozen for another future use, soup or for use
    > as a poaching liquid again. Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    > frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain? I don't
    > think food safety issues come into play, rather quality issues. And yes, I
    > know, "Try it and let us know how it turns out." But I'm guessing that
    > somebody here would have experience in this matter and might be willing to
    > share.


    I don't do that, but I don't see why you couldn't. There's no reason
    why quality should suffer. It's just broth.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  5. #5
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    aem wrote:

    > In my opinion, poaching chicken and making broth are opposing
    > endeavors. If you've poached the chicken for chicken salad the
    > resulting broth should have minimal chicken flavor and won't merit
    > saving or reusing. You've made every effort to keep all the flavor
    > and goodies in the chicken, not extracted it into the liquid, so enjoy
    > the chicken. If later you want soup or to poach some more chicken,
    > start over.
    >
    > This is the other side of the coin when you hear people say they make
    > chicken broth/stock and use the chicken for salad or pot pie or a la
    > king. Well, if they've done a good job of making broth the chicken
    > should be dead and tasteless because all the flavor and goodness has
    > been extracted.
    >
    > My opinion, since you asked.


    Exactly so, as far as I'm concerned.

    Serene
    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  6. #6
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    On 5/22/2010 4:45 PM, Paco wrote:
    > After poaching chicken for chicken salad, for example, the resulting
    > broth gets strained, packaged and frozen for another future use, soup or
    > for use as a poaching liquid again. Any opinions on whether this broth
    > can be frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the
    > drain? I don't think food safety issues come into play, rather quality
    > issues. And yes, I know, "Try it and let us know how it turns out." But
    > I'm guessing that somebody here would have experience in this matter and
    > might be willing to share.
    >



    I think it would take 2 or 3 poachings before it would have enough
    flavor to use in soup. No reason not to refreeze it if you have the
    freezer room.

    Bob

  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    aem <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This is the other side of the coin when you hear people say they make
    > chicken broth/stock and use the chicken for salad or pot pie or a la
    > king. Well, if they've done a good job of making broth the chicken
    > should be dead and tasteless because all the flavor and goodness has
    > been extracted.
    >
    > My opinion, since you asked. -aem


    That is why the only good use for chicken used to make stock is chicken
    salad. <g> You add a LOT of other flavorings to the salad and the meat
    is only there for texture and protein content. It still has a little
    flavor left as you can't cook all of it out.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  8. #8
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 22 May 2010 17:45:49 -0400, "Paco" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > After poaching chicken for chicken salad, for example, the resulting broth
    > > gets strained, packaged and frozen for another future use, soup or for use
    > > as a poaching liquid again. Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    > > frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain? I don't
    > > think food safety issues come into play, rather quality issues. And yes, I
    > > know, "Try it and let us know how it turns out." But I'm guessing that
    > > somebody here would have experience in this matter and might be willing to
    > > share.

    >
    > I don't do that, but I don't see why you couldn't. There's no reason
    > why quality should suffer. It's just broth.


    I actually have done that more or less. I've taken the water from
    steaming veggies for instance (and it always ends up flavored) and
    freezing it, then later use it to poach chicken. It concentrates it
    more and ends up making a very flavorful stock which can then be
    re-frozen.

    I also freeze the water I use to rehydrate ****ake mushrooms and re-use
    it.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    Only Irish coffee provides in a single glass all four essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar and fat. --Alex Levine

  9. #9
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    On Sat, 22 May 2010 17:45:49 -0400, "Paco" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >After poaching chicken for chicken salad, for example, the resulting broth
    >gets strained, packaged and frozen for another future use, soup or for use
    >as a poaching liquid again. Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    >frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain? I don't
    >think food safety issues come into play, rather quality issues. And yes, I
    >know, "Try it and let us know how it turns out." But I'm guessing that
    >somebody here would have experience in this matter and might be willing to
    >share.


    If yoose ever watched the Frug you'd know to wrap chicky in plastic
    wrap, or in zip-locs to poach... the poaching liquid should never
    contact the chicken, the chicken won't lose any flavor/anything.

  10. #10
    isw Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    brooklyn1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 22 May 2010 17:45:49 -0400, "Paco" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >After poaching chicken for chicken salad, for example, the resulting broth
    > >gets strained, packaged and frozen for another future use, soup or for use
    > >as a poaching liquid again. Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    > >frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain? I don't
    > >think food safety issues come into play, rather quality issues. And yes, I
    > >know, "Try it and let us know how it turns out." But I'm guessing that
    > >somebody here would have experience in this matter and might be willing to
    > >share.

    >
    > If yoose ever watched the Frug you'd know to wrap chicky in plastic
    > wrap, or in zip-locs to poach... the poaching liquid should never
    > contact the chicken, the chicken won't lose any flavor/anything.


    What about the chicken *gaining something* from the plastic wrap?

    Isaac

  11. #11
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question


    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio >
    > "Paco" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    >> frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain?


    Do it. I have a recipe that is based on the idea that the broth in which it
    is cooked gets better each time you cook it and it's true. Round one itės a
    tasty veal dish. Round four and your socks take your shoes with them as
    they blast off your feet.
    >
    > I'd not reuse it a scond time. Just my thing.


    I recall my grandmother on the French side had a stockpot that was added to
    everyday. By the weekend it was really fine stuff. Try it once. Pot au
    feu becomes another excperience.



  12. #12
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question


    "aem" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]...
    > On May 22, 2:45 pm, "Paco" <n...@thank.you> wrote:

    Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    >> frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain?

    >
    > In my opinion, poaching chicken and making broth are opposing> endeavors.


    You are proposing poaching chicken breasts in water? I wouldn't expect
    either half of that combination to taste of much.



  13. #13
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    On Sun, 23 May 2010 08:15:03 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    ..
    >Do it. I have a recipe that is based on the idea that the broth in which it
    >is cooked gets better each time you cook it and it's true. Round one itės a
    >tasty veal dish. Round four and your socks take your shoes with them as
    >they blast off your feet.
    >

    I do it too. I cook a Hainanese chicken in water to start, then I
    freeze the ensuing broth. Next time I cook the same recipe for the
    chicken, I use the same broth, defrosted. Better broth, better
    chicken..and better broth from the 2nd cooking. Nothing is hurt..it
    is all good. No bad bugs..it all cooks away. I cook, freeze the
    broth, defrost the broth the next time, cook the chicken, and then
    freeze the broth...and ad nauseum. It works very well. No
    sickness....

    Christine

  14. #14
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question


    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    Nothing is hurt..it> is all good. No bad bugs..it all cooks away. I cook,
    freeze the> broth, defrost the broth the next time, cook the chicken, and
    then> freeze the broth...and ad nauseum. It works very well. No
    > sickness....


    No , of course not. Read a book on food prep from the days before
    refrigeration and you will read that if you boil broth five minutes each day
    it's safely kept without ice. We don't need to do that, but how anyone
    could imagine that recooking and refreezing broth would lower quality, I
    don't know. That said, even the fiorst time I start with vegetable broth,
    so it's not like glorified water.



  15. #15
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    On Sat, 22 May 2010 15:43:02 -0700 (PDT), aem wrote:

    > On May 22, 2:45 pm, "Paco" <n...@thank.you> wrote:
    >> After poaching chicken for chicken salad, for example, the resulting broth
    >> gets strained, packaged and frozen for another future use, soup or for use
    >> as a poaching liquid again. Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    >> frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain?

    >
    > In my opinion, poaching chicken and making broth are opposing
    > endeavors. If you've poached the chicken for chicken salad the
    > resulting broth should have minimal chicken flavor and won't merit
    > saving or reusing. You've made every effort to keep all the flavor
    > and goodies in the chicken, not extracted it into the liquid, so enjoy
    > the chicken. If later you want soup or to poach some more chicken,
    > start over.
    >
    > This is the other side of the coin when you hear people say they make
    > chicken broth/stock and use the chicken for salad or pot pie or a la
    > king. Well, if they've done a good job of making broth the chicken
    > should be dead and tasteless because all the flavor and goodness has
    > been extracted.
    >
    > My opinion, since you asked. -aem


    i thought that was supposed to be how it works, too.

    your pal,
    blake

  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    In article <542wk987awhf$.1owg92roh7rdz$.[email protected]>,
    blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 22 May 2010 15:43:02 -0700 (PDT), aem wrote:
    >
    > > On May 22, 2:45 pm, "Paco" <n...@thank.you> wrote:
    > >> After poaching chicken for chicken salad, for example, the resulting broth
    > >> gets strained, packaged and frozen for another future use, soup or for use
    > >> as a poaching liquid again. Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    > >> frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain?

    > >
    > > In my opinion, poaching chicken and making broth are opposing
    > > endeavors. If you've poached the chicken for chicken salad the
    > > resulting broth should have minimal chicken flavor and won't merit
    > > saving or reusing. You've made every effort to keep all the flavor
    > > and goodies in the chicken, not extracted it into the liquid, so enjoy
    > > the chicken. If later you want soup or to poach some more chicken,
    > > start over.
    > >
    > > This is the other side of the coin when you hear people say they make
    > > chicken broth/stock and use the chicken for salad or pot pie or a la
    > > king. Well, if they've done a good job of making broth the chicken
    > > should be dead and tasteless because all the flavor and goodness has
    > > been extracted.
    > >
    > > My opinion, since you asked. -aem

    >
    > i thought that was supposed to be how it works, too.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    I've pressure cooked chicken to make soup broths and I find it to be
    impossible to totally cook ALL of the flavor out of chicken meat. That
    is why the meat is perfectly suitable for chicken salads or if you can
    reach a happy medium cooking it, especially with other stock ingredients
    (Miripois), the meat can sometimes be added back to the soup along with
    fresh vegetables.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    Only Irish coffee provides in a single glass all four essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar and fat. --Alex Levine

  17. #17
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question

    On May 23, 1:15*am, "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> ha scritto nel messaggio >
    >
    > > "Paco" <n...@thank.you> wrote in message

    >
    > *Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    >
    > >> frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain?

    >
    > Do it. *I have a recipe that is based on the idea that the broth in which it
    > is cooked gets better each time you cook it and it's true. *Round one itės a
    > tasty veal dish. *Round four and your socks take your shoes with them as
    > they blast off your feet.
    >

    Exactly How could it not get better?

    --Bryan

  18. #18
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Chicken broth question


    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio >
    >> "Paco" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >
    > Any opinions on whether this broth can be
    >>> frozen again after it's second use or should it go down the drain?

    >
    > Do it. I have a recipe that is based on the idea that the broth in which
    > it is cooked gets better each time you cook it and it's true. Round one
    > itės a tasty veal dish. Round four and your socks take your shoes with
    > them as they blast off your feet.
    >>
    >> I'd not reuse it a scond time. Just my thing.

    >
    > I recall my grandmother on the French side had a stockpot that was added
    > to everyday. By the weekend it was really fine stuff. Try it once. Pot
    > au feu becomes another excperience.


    Sure, common thing in French restaurants. Every day they would toss in meat
    or vegetable trimmings and then every night they'd remove the day's solids,
    top it off with water and start afresh the next day. They'd usually do this
    for a week before switching to a newer batch. At some point the flavor just
    burns out. Escoffier used this method before they had refrigerators.

    Paul



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32