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Thread: Chestnuts

  1. #1
    Corey Richardson Guest

    Default Chestnuts

    It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are full and the
    chestnuts are very nearly ripe and about to begin to fall.

    How do you like to use your collected chestnuts - just roasted and eaten
    with salt or do you have a favourite chestnut recipe?



  2. #2
    Pete Wilkins Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts


    "Corey Richardson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are full and the
    > chestnuts are very nearly ripe and about to begin to fall.
    >
    > How do you like to use your collected chestnuts - just roasted and eaten
    > with salt or do you have a favourite chestnut recipe?


    For some unknown reason I have never *ever* sprinkled salt over roast
    chestnuts. I do like them plain roasted and I suspect I will like them even
    more when sprinkled with salt. Thank you.

    p.s. I LOVE SALT! And I'm now at an age when extra salt will not make a single
    bit of difference to the length of life left to me. Come to think of it, extra
    salt has not cut me short as yet, though YMMMV. Do you know, I even salt my
    coffee after I learned that trick in the Netherlands when I lived there many,
    many years ago?

    I did stop the "excess" use of salt some years ago after listening to some
    "expert nurses" and other assorted quacks: I stopped having my little pile of
    salt with things like a stick of celery, scallions (spring onions) and hard
    boiled eggs.

    Then maybe ten years ago I started using salt again just as I used to use it
    in my youth and younger days:

    There is nothing tastier than a fresh picked scallion, rinsed, then dipped in
    a small pile of salt. Likewise, a fresh stick of celery - wave it around while
    you are speaking to your lunch/dinner partners, then plunge it into that
    little pile of salt and snap off a big bite! Heaven! A hard boiled egg without
    salt is nothing. It ain't even an egg! And a radish without salt is like a day
    without sunshine! Salt, salt, gimme salt!

    It ain't killed me (yet!). It has not changed for the worse any of my "read
    outs" which the nurses in particular seem to relish revealing to me when I go
    for some sort of "check-up". (The specialists never seem to bother or care
    about such figures - do they know something we do not?)

    --
    Pete






  3. #3
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    On Oct 13, 4:39*pm, Corey Richardson <coreyrchr...@googlemail.com>
    wrote:
    > It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are full and the
    > chestnuts are very nearly ripe and about to begin to fall.
    >
    > How do you like to use your collected chestnuts - just roasted and eaten
    > with salt or do you have a favourite chestnut recipe?


    I like them unroasted- just peel & eat!

  4. #4
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    Pete Wilkins wrote:


    > p.s. I LOVE SALT! And I'm now at an age when extra salt will not make a single
    > bit of difference to the length of life left to me. Come to think of it, extra
    > salt has not cut me short as yet, though YMMMV. Do you know, I even salt my
    > coffee after I learned that trick in the Netherlands when I lived there many,
    > many years ago?


    I add salt to pretty much anything homemade that is chocolate flavored.
    Vanilla, too, for that matter. I would say that salt adds depth to
    sweet flavors. Non-foodies describe homemade vanilla frosting or
    chocolate fudge with added salt as tasting "rich".

    I've never tasted salted coffee but I suspect that the effect would be
    similar.


  5. #5
    The Ranger Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    merryb <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Oct 13, 4:39 pm, Corey Richardson
    <coreyrchr...@googlemail.com>
    wrote:
    >> It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are
    >> full and the chestnuts are very nearly ripe and
    >> about to begin to fall.
    >>
    >> How do you like to use your collected chestnuts
    >> - just roasted and eaten with salt or do you have
    >> a favourite chestnut recipe?

    >
    > I like them unroasted- just peel & eat!


    ROASTED CHESTNUT SOUP WITH DUMPLINGS
    from Essence of Emeril EE2A02

    INGREDIENTS:
    * 1 1/2 pounds Fresh chestnuts, roasted and peeled
    (or 2 10-ounce cans whole chestnuts, drained)
    * 1 cup chopped onions
    * 1/2 cup chopped celery
    * 1 tablespoon garlic
    * 2 bay leaves
    * 1 large Idaho potato, peeled and coarsely chopped
    (about 2 cups)
    * 2 quarts light chicken stock
    * 1 sprig of thyme
    * 1/4 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
    * 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh basil
    * Juice of half a lemon
    * Dash of Worcestershire sauce
    * 1 cup warmed heavy cream
    * Salt and freshly ground black pepper
    * DUMPLINGS:
    * 1/4 pound ground pork
    * 1/2 tablespoon chopped garlic
    * 1 tablespoon chopped green onions
    * 1 tablespoon chopped parsley
    * 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
    * 1 egg yolk
    * 2 tablespoons heavy cream
    * 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    * 1/4 teaspoon quatre d'epices
    * Salt and freshly ground black pepper
    * 16 wonton wrappers

    In a saucepan combine chestnuts, onions, celery, garlic, bay
    leaves, potato and chicken stock and simmer until potatoes are
    tender, about 45 minutes. In a blender, puree the soup in
    batches along with fresh herbs, lemon juice, and Worcestershire
    sauce. Stir in heavy cream and season with salt and freshly
    ground black pepper.

    DUMPLINGS:
    In the bowl of a food processor combine pork, garlic, green
    onions and parsley and process until smooth. Add the
    Worcestershire, egg yolk, heavy cream, crushed red pepper,
    quatre d'epices and salt and pepper and pulse until thoroughly
    combined.

    To assemble dumplings, use a spoon to place a tablespoon-sized
    dollop of filling in the center of a wonton wrapper. Use your
    fingers to wet the edges of the wrapper, then fold in half,
    easing edges so that they meet to form a triangle. Press firmly
    to seal dumplings.

    In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook dumplings in small
    batches so as not to crowd. Dumplings are done when they float
    and wrappers are tender and translucent, 5 to 6 minutes. Serve
    dumplings floating in hot chestnut soup.

    Yield: 16 dumplings

    This has been requested lots since I first made it. And it
    stores nicely, too, so you can really batch it.

    The Ranger



  6. #6
    Pete Wilkins Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts


    "Kathleen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Xb6Jk.21$[email protected]..
    > Pete Wilkins wrote:
    >
    >
    >> p.s. I LOVE SALT! And I'm now at an age when extra salt will not make a
    >> single bit of difference to the length of life left to me. Come to think of
    >> it, extra salt has not cut me short as yet, though YMMMV. Do you know, I
    >> even salt my coffee after I learned that trick in the Netherlands when I
    >> lived there many, many years ago?

    >
    > I add salt to pretty much anything homemade that is chocolate flavored.
    > Vanilla, too, for that matter. I would say that salt adds depth to sweet
    > flavors. Non-foodies describe homemade vanilla frosting or chocolate fudge
    > with added salt as tasting "rich".


    I've more or less gotten back to the "pinch of salt" school after having
    abandoned it for many years due to what I now firmly believe to be "health
    scares".

    I don't eat a lot of anything these days but a couple of days ago I had a
    craving for some home made salt/smoked brisket I had in the fridge. When I
    looked back at what I had eaten over the past couple of days there was a
    distinct lack of protein in my consumption. There were loads of other things
    available in the fridge but I suspect my body was telling me I needed a bit of
    protein and a bit of salt?

    > I've never tasted salted coffee but I suspect that the effect would be
    > similar.


    It is definitely worth a try. *Not* a huge pinch - with coffee a very little
    goes a long way, but a tiny pinch of salt does make a vast difference to the
    taste.

    I always remember being challenged by a junior mess room steward:

    *"WHY ARE YOU PUTTING SALT IN THE COFFEE???"*
    (He challenged me as if I was trying to poison everyone in the camp.)

    A very big Dutchman sitting in the messhall said:

    *"Everyone puts salt in their coffee!!!"*

    It was end of argument but beginning of very big discussion among the workers
    there. Some had heard of salt in coffee, some had not. And as a lot of them
    said, well, when the boss makes the coffee it tastes pretty good. (This even
    included some Italian divers who also appreciated the extra services I made
    sure was supplied to them when they were forced to live in their hyperbaric
    chamber.) They too liked my coffee.

    --
    Pete





  7. #7
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    merryb wrote:
    > On Oct 13, 4:39 pm, Corey Richardson <coreyrchr...@googlemail.com>
    > wrote:
    >> It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are full and the
    >> chestnuts are very nearly ripe and about to begin to fall.
    >>
    >> How do you like to use your collected chestnuts - just roasted and eaten
    >> with salt or do you have a favourite chestnut recipe?

    >
    > I like them unroasted- just peel & eat!



    My dad used to like them roasted and dipped in butter.
    He had a friend who roasted them in a large bonfire
    and served them with homemade red wine.

    gloria p

  8. #8
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    Pete Wilkins wrote:

    > It is definitely worth a try. *Not* a huge pinch - with coffee a very
    > little goes a long way, but a tiny pinch of salt does make a vast
    > difference to the taste.
    >
    > I always remember being challenged by a junior mess room steward:
    >
    > *"WHY ARE YOU PUTTING SALT IN THE COFFEE???"*
    > (He challenged me as if I was trying to poison everyone in the camp.)


    > A very big Dutchman sitting in the messhall said:
    >
    > *"Everyone puts salt in their coffee!!!"*
    >

    That's funny! The guy probably thought it was some kind of prank.

    nancy

  9. #9
    Pete Wilkins Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts


    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Yl7Jk.2887$[email protected]..
    > Pete Wilkins wrote:
    >
    >> It is definitely worth a try. *Not* a huge pinch - with coffee a very
    >> little goes a long way, but a tiny pinch of salt does make a vast
    >> difference to the taste.
    >>
    >> I always remember being challenged by a junior mess room steward:
    >>
    >> *"WHY ARE YOU PUTTING SALT IN THE COFFEE???"*
    >> (He challenged me as if I was trying to poison everyone in the camp.)

    >
    >> A very big Dutchman sitting in the messhall said:
    >>
    >> *"Everyone puts salt in their coffee!!!"*
    >>

    > That's funny! The guy probably thought it was some kind of prank.
    >
    > nancy


    LOL! Yes, Nancy, I think the young mess steward *did* initially think I was
    doing a dastardly deed in salting the coffee. I just never ever considered
    things to be otherwise, than:
    filter paper in + so many scoops of coffee + pinch of salt = switch on!

    Apparently only me and the Dutchmen thought the same - and I was English! (But
    I had lived in Holland for a while.)
    I hope everyone reading this will one day try a very *small* pinch of salt in
    their coffee just to see what it tastes like. After all, if I'd never met any
    Dutchmen (and US expats who also liked their coffee that way!) I'd never known
    any difference and would still be drinking the same old "quarter of Kenya
    coffee, medium ground, please," like my mother always drank.

    --
    Pete



  10. #10
    Dave Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    merryb wrote:

    > On Oct 13, 4:39 pm, Corey Richardson <coreyrchr...@googlemail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are full and the
    >>chestnuts are very nearly ripe and about to begin to fall.
    >>
    >>How do you like to use your collected chestnuts - just roasted and eaten
    >>with salt or do you have a favourite chestnut recipe?

    >
    >
    > I like them unroasted- just peel & eat!


    How do you peel them? They seam so hard.

    Dave

  11. #11
    Pete Wilkins Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts


    "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > merryb wrote:
    >
    >> On Oct 13, 4:39 pm, Corey Richardson <coreyrchr...@googlemail.com>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are full and the
    >>>chestnuts are very nearly ripe and about to begin to fall.
    >>>
    >>>How do you like to use your collected chestnuts - just roasted and eaten
    >>>with salt or do you have a favourite chestnut recipe?

    >>
    >>
    >> I like them unroasted- just peel & eat!

    >
    > How do you peel them? They seam so hard.


    Suck 'em and seam - or you could always ask G or M!

    --
    Pete



  12. #12
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    Gloria P wrote:

    > He had a friend who roasted them in a large bonfire
    > and served them with homemade red wine.
    >
    > gloria p


    Oh yeah, my dad would do that too.

  13. #13
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts



    Kathleen wrote:
    >
    > Pete Wilkins wrote:
    >
    > > p.s. I LOVE SALT! And I'm now at an age when extra salt will not make a single
    > > bit of difference to the length of life left to me. Come to think of it, extra
    > > salt has not cut me short as yet, though YMMMV. Do you know, I even salt my
    > > coffee after I learned that trick in the Netherlands when I lived there many,
    > > many years ago?

    >
    > I add salt to pretty much anything homemade that is chocolate flavored.
    > Vanilla, too, for that matter. I would say that salt adds depth to
    > sweet flavors. Non-foodies describe homemade vanilla frosting or
    > chocolate fudge with added salt as tasting "rich".
    >
    > I've never tasted salted coffee but I suspect that the effect would be
    > similar.


    Here's what these people have to say about salt in coffee:

    http://www.saltinstitute.org/29.html

    Improving coffee - A pinch of salt in coffee will enhance the
    flavor and remove the bitterness of over-cooked coffee.

  14. #14
    Corey Richardson Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 19:58:36 +0100, "Pete Wilkins"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Corey Richardson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are full and the
    >> chestnuts are very nearly ripe and about to begin to fall.
    >>
    >> How do you like to use your collected chestnuts - just roasted and eaten
    >> with salt or do you have a favourite chestnut recipe?

    >
    >For some unknown reason I have never *ever* sprinkled salt over roast
    >chestnuts. I do like them plain roasted and I suspect I will like them even
    >more when sprinkled with salt. Thank you.
    >
    >p.s. I LOVE SALT! And I'm now at an age when extra salt will not make a single
    >bit of difference to the length of life left to me. Come to think of it, extra
    >salt has not cut me short as yet, though YMMMV. Do you know, I even salt my
    >coffee after I learned that trick in the Netherlands when I lived there many,
    >many years ago?
    >
    >I did stop the "excess" use of salt some years ago after listening to some
    >"expert nurses" and other assorted quacks: I stopped having my little pile of
    >salt with things like a stick of celery, scallions (spring onions) and hard
    >boiled eggs.
    >
    >Then maybe ten years ago I started using salt again just as I used to use it
    >in my youth and younger days:
    >
    >There is nothing tastier than a fresh picked scallion, rinsed, then dipped in
    >a small pile of salt. Likewise, a fresh stick of celery - wave it around while
    >you are speaking to your lunch/dinner partners, then plunge it into that
    >little pile of salt and snap off a big bite! Heaven! A hard boiled egg without
    >salt is nothing. It ain't even an egg! And a radish without salt is like a day
    >without sunshine! Salt, salt, gimme salt!
    >
    >It ain't killed me (yet!). It has not changed for the worse any of my "read
    >outs" which the nurses in particular seem to relish revealing to me when I go
    >for some sort of "check-up". (The specialists never seem to bother or care
    >about such figures - do they know something we do not?)


    I sometimes (often?) have a "thing" about salt too. It's not unknown for
    me to eat a stick of rhubarb by dipping its end in salt!


  15. #15
    Corey Richardson Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 20:37:50 +0100, "Pete Wilkins"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >A very big Dutchman sitting in the messhall said:
    >
    >*"Everyone puts salt in their coffee!!!"*


    I think I'll try this tomorrow, thanks for the tip.


  16. #16
    Corey Richardson Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 12:14:03 -0700 (PDT), merryb <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Oct 13, 4:39*pm, Corey Richardson <coreyrchr...@googlemail.com>
    >wrote:
    >> It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are full and the
    >> chestnuts are very nearly ripe and about to begin to fall.
    >>
    >> How do you like to use your collected chestnuts - just roasted and eaten
    >> with salt or do you have a favourite chestnut recipe?

    >
    >I like them unroasted- just peel & eat!


    Really? I understand that not only are they tough in that state, but
    they're also dangerous to eat because of the tannic acid levels?


  17. #17
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    On Oct 14, 2:24*pm, Dave <daven...@btopenworld.com> wrote:
    > merryb wrote:
    > > On Oct 13, 4:39 pm, Corey Richardson <coreyrchr...@googlemail.com>
    > > wrote:

    >
    > >>It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are full and the
    > >>chestnuts are very nearly ripe and about to begin to fall.

    >
    > >>How do you like to use your collected chestnuts - just roasted and eaten
    > >>with salt or do you have a favourite chestnut recipe?

    >
    > > I like them unroasted- just peel & eat!

    >
    > How do you peel them? They seam so hard.
    >
    > Dave


    They are a pain in the ass, especially the furry skin- sometimes it
    comes off easily, other times not. I don't eat a lot of them as they
    are so expensive, but I do buy a dozen or so every year.

  18. #18
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    On Oct 14, 6:22*pm, Corey Richardson <coreyrchr...@googlemail.com>
    wrote:
    > On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 12:14:03 -0700 (PDT), merryb <msg...@juno.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >On Oct 13, 4:39*pm, Corey Richardson <coreyrchr...@googlemail.com>
    > >wrote:
    > >> It's very nearly chestnut time again. The trees are full and the
    > >> chestnuts are very nearly ripe and about to begin to fall.

    >
    > >> How do you like to use your collected chestnuts - just roasted and eaten
    > >> with salt or do you have a favourite chestnut recipe?

    >
    > >I like them unroasted- just peel & eat!

    >
    > Really? I understand that not only are they tough in that state, but
    > they're also dangerous to eat because of the tannic acid levels?


    Not sure about that! Not sure if you would consider them tough, but
    they are crunchy...

  19. #19
    Waldo Centini Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    Op Wed, 15 Oct 2008 08:40:58 -0700 (PDT) merryb illuminated the masses
    with this:

    > They are a pain in the ass, especially the furry skin- sometimes it
    > comes off easily, other times not. I don't eat a lot of them as they
    > are so expensive, but I do buy a dozen or so every year.


    I just pick 'm off the ground....

    --
    *** Waldo ***
    The most useful tool for dealing with management types is, of
    course, an automatic weapon.

  20. #20
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Chestnuts

    On Oct 15, 9:09*am, Waldo Centini <"waldocentini[NOSPAM]"@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    > Op Wed, 15 Oct 2008 08:40:58 -0700 (PDT) *merryb illuminated the masses
    > with this:
    >
    > > They are a pain in the ass, especially the furry skin- sometimes it
    > > comes off easily, other times not. I don't eat a lot of them as they
    > > are so expensive, but I do buy a dozen or so every year.

    >
    > I just pick 'm off the ground....
    >
    > --
    > *** Waldo ***
    > The most useful tool for dealing with management types is, of
    > course, an automatic weapon.


    Lucky you- you must be in Europe somewhere? I thought I heard
    something about a blight that had wiped out lots of trees here in the
    US...We have to pay about $5 a pound...

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