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Thread: Chef Badges of Honor?

  1. #1
    Andy Guest

    Default Chef Badges of Honor?

    Chef Badges of Honor?

    On some cooking programs I've seen a few hosts that have badges on their
    sleeves.

    What do they represent? They never zoom in close enough to tell.

    I'm guessing it's a cooking school "diploma."

    ??

    Andy
    --
    Eat first, talk later.

  2. #2
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On May 12, 3:57*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > Chef Badges of Honor?
    >
    > On some cooking programs I've seen a few hosts that have badges on their
    > sleeves.
    >
    > What do they represent? They never zoom in close enough to tell.
    >
    > I'm guessing it's a cooking school "diploma."
    >
    > ??


    "The toque (chef's hat) dates back to the 16th century when hats were
    common in many trades. Different heights of hats indicate rank within
    a kitchen. The symbolism of the 100 folds of the toque are said to
    represent the many different ways a chef knows to cook an egg."
    source-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chef%27s_uniform
    >
    > Andy
    >


    --Bryan

  3. #3
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On May 12, 4:57 am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > Chef Badges of Honor?
    >
    > On some cooking programs I've seen a few hosts that have badges on their
    > sleeves.
    >
    > What do they represent? They never zoom in close enough to tell.
    >
    > I'm guessing it's a cooking school "diploma."
    >
    > ??
    >
    > Andy
    > --


    Dunno the specifics, but professional organizations have badges you
    can sew on. IACP (international association of culinary
    professionals) is just one of them. I don't think it is a diploma.
    Very large numbers of top chefs were taught as apprentices in fine
    kitchens rather than schools. From my POV, wearing a school badge
    would be like admitting you weren't able to apprentice. There are
    very few schools with high recognition names, anyway.



  4. #4
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On May 12, 6:50 am, Bobo Bonobo® <CLASS...@BRICK.NET> wrote:

    >
    > "The toque (chef's hat) dates back to the 16th century when hats were
    > common in many trades. Different heights of hats indicate rank within
    > a kitchen. The symbolism of the 100 folds of the toque are said to
    > represent the many different ways a chef knows to cook an egg."
    > source-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chef%27s_uniform
    >
    >
    >
    > > Andy

    >
    > --Bryan


    It depends even more on what is sold where you work! Maybe in Paris
    or NY you can select any style hat, but in most places you're lucky to
    find one style in a size that doesn't fall down over your eyes.

  5. #5
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On Tue, 12 May 2009 03:57:41 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Chef Badges of Honor?
    >
    >On some cooking programs I've seen a few hosts that have badges on their
    >sleeves.
    >
    >What do they represent? They never zoom in close enough to tell.
    >
    >I'm guessing it's a cooking school "diploma."
    >
    >??
    >
    >Andy



    Possibly competitions they've been in or the Red Seal Accreditation.

    http://www.go2hr.ca/Apprenticeshipbr...1/Default.aspx

    Not sure if they get the badge for the Blue Seal (used to be Gold
    Seal) Accreditation or not

  6. #6
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On Tue, 12 May 2009 06:30:38 -0700 (PDT), Giusi wrote:

    > On May 12, 4:57 am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >> Chef Badges of Honor?
    >>
    >> On some cooking programs I've seen a few hosts that have badges on their
    >> sleeves.
    >>
    >> What do they represent? They never zoom in close enough to tell.
    >>
    >> I'm guessing it's a cooking school "diploma."
    >>
    >> ??
    >>
    >> Andy
    >> --

    >
    > Dunno the specifics, but professional organizations have badges you
    > can sew on. IACP (international association of culinary
    > professionals) is just one of them. I don't think it is a diploma.
    > Very large numbers of top chefs were taught as apprentices in fine
    > kitchens rather than schools. From my POV, wearing a school badge
    > would be like admitting you weren't able to apprentice. There are
    > very few schools with high recognition names, anyway.


    when i see 'CIA gradute' (a.k.a. culinary institute of america) it always
    confused the **** out of me for a second.

    your spooked pal,
    blake

  7. #7
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    Giusi said...

    > From my POV, wearing a school badge
    > would be like admitting you weren't able to apprentice. There are
    > very few schools with high recognition names, anyway.



    Giusi,

    Good point!

    Maybe it's some world recognition award in the culinary arts.

    I'm going to email the chef that wore one to ask, after I see his show again.

    Best,

    Andy
    --
    Eat first, talk later.

  8. #8
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On May 12, 9:32 am, Giusi <decob...@googlemail.com> wrote:
    > On May 12, 6:50 am, Bobo Bonobo® <CLASS...@BRICK.NET> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > "The toque (chef's hat) dates back to the 16th century when hats were
    > > common in many trades. Different heights of hats indicate rank within
    > > a kitchen. The symbolism of the 100 folds of the toque are said to
    > > represent the many different ways a chef knows to cook an egg."
    > > source-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chef%27s_uniform

    >
    > > > Andy

    >
    > > --Bryan

    >
    > It depends even more on what is sold where you work! Maybe in Paris
    > or NY you can select any style hat, but in most places you're lucky to
    > find one style in a size that doesn't fall down over your eyes.


    Drifting a little here, but, when my mother was a nurse, 40-50 years
    ago, they wore uniforms, not scrubs or smocks. And always two things
    - a pin from their school, and the school's (not their current
    hospital's) signature cap. Like a regimental tie - you don't wear it
    because it matches your socks, but because you earned it. Always
    thought that was kinda cool. Maybe because her's (Grace Hospital, now
    part of Wayne State U. in Detroit) had a beautiful filigreed pin and a
    classic "nurse style" cap with black and pink ribbon. I'd see other
    nurses with a nut-cup or doily pinned to their hair and think "My mom
    is so much better".

    B

  9. #9
    Virginia Tadrzynski Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?


    "bulka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On May 12, 9:32 am, Giusi <decob...@googlemail.com> wrote:
    > On May 12, 6:50 am, Bobo Bonobo® <CLASS...@BRICK.NET> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > "The toque (chef's hat) dates back to the 16th century when hats were
    > > common in many trades. Different heights of hats indicate rank within
    > > a kitchen. The symbolism of the 100 folds of the toque are said to
    > > represent the many different ways a chef knows to cook an egg."
    > > source-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chef%27s_uniform

    >
    > > > Andy

    >
    > > --Bryan

    >
    > It depends even more on what is sold where you work! Maybe in Paris
    > or NY you can select any style hat, but in most places you're lucky to
    > find one style in a size that doesn't fall down over your eyes.


    Drifting a little here, but, when my mother was a nurse, 40-50 years
    ago, they wore uniforms, not scrubs or smocks. And always two things
    - a pin from their school, and the school's (not their current
    hospital's) signature cap. Like a regimental tie - you don't wear it
    because it matches your socks, but because you earned it. Always
    thought that was kinda cool. Maybe because her's (Grace Hospital, now
    part of Wayne State U. in Detroit) had a beautiful filigreed pin and a
    classic "nurse style" cap with black and pink ribbon. I'd see other
    nurses with a nut-cup or doily pinned to their hair and think "My mom
    is so much better".

    B

    I remember those. Each school could be told by the cap. Those with not
    such upstanding reps were part of the reason the whole 'cap' went the way of
    the wind, since you were judged by your school before you could open your
    mouth. Maybe that was a good thing, I dunno.

    As far as cooking insignia, FWIW, FBS has the ACF tattooed on his ankle.
    -ginny



  10. #10
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:

    > I remember those. Each school could be told by the cap. Those with not
    > such upstanding reps were part of the reason the whole 'cap' went the way of
    > the wind, since you were judged by your school before you could open your
    > mouth. Maybe that was a good thing, I dunno.
    >


    No, caps went the way of the dodo bird when they figured out that they
    were infection control nightmares. They got in the way of procedures,
    they were touching dirty hair, hands touched them then other
    things..yada yada yada. They were considered filthy messes and people
    wised up. Now the next infection control worry is male doctors neck
    ties. A bow tie is a good thing in medicine.

  11. #11
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On Thu, 14 May 2009 03:35:10 -0400, Goomba <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >No, caps went the way of the dodo bird when they figured out that they
    >were infection control nightmares. They got in the way of procedures,
    >they were touching dirty hair, hands touched them then other
    >things..yada yada yada. They were considered filthy messes and people
    >wised up. Now the next infection control worry is male doctors neck
    >ties. A bow tie is a good thing in medicine.


    Plus, they were a general pain the patootie....

    I wore mine for my first two jobs...and when I got into pediatrics, I
    never looked back. I haven't worn it since..and that has been over
    35 years ago.

    Mine looked like a sunbonnet, with the brim turned back and the bow
    tied in back. It came from an old diploma school in Philly...and it
    was a pain to clean, iron, and keep clean. It was a pain to put on,
    and keep on..and gave me a headache by the end of the night. And when
    one has been running all night, it didn't look so hot when it was
    worn.

    Somewhere, in all my moves, it has disappeared. I would love one just
    for sentimental reasons.... Maybe I could get one from my old
    school.....if they are even made anymore...

    I know, we looked forward to the Capping ceremony. It was a big event
    in our nursing lives....and at that time, symbolized a great deal.
    Maybe that is why I still want one, even if I never wear one ever
    again.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  12. #12
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On May 12, 6:50 am, Bobo Bonobo® <CLASS...@BRICK.NET> wrote:
    > On May 12, 3:57 am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >
    > > Chef Badges of Honor?

    >
    > > On some cooking programs I've seen a few hosts that have badges on their
    > > sleeves.

    >
    > > What do they represent? They never zoom in close enough to tell.

    >
    > > I'm guessing it's a cooking school "diploma."

    >
    > > ??

    >
    > "The toque (chef's hat) dates back to the 16th century when hats were
    > common in many trades. Different heights of hats indicate rank within
    > a kitchen. The symbolism of the 100 folds of the toque are said to
    > represent the many different ways a chef knows to cook an egg."
    > source-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chef%27s_uniform
    >
    >
    >
    > > Andy

    >
    > --Bryan


    I'm trying to remember the name and author. Russian. Maybe Gogol.
    Members of the Writers' Union were given fur hats, status matched by
    the staus of the fur, from sable on down. The narrator discovers his
    was made from a cat.

    B

  13. #13
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On May 14, 3:44 am, Christine Dabney <artis...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    > On Thu, 14 May 2009 03:35:10 -0400, Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >No, caps went the way of the dodo bird when they figured out that they
    > >were infection control nightmares. They got in the way of procedures,
    > >they were touching dirty hair, hands touched them then other
    > >things..yada yada yada. They were considered filthy messes and people
    > >wised up. Now the next infection control worry is male doctors neck
    > >ties. A bow tie is a good thing in medicine.

    >
    > Plus, they were a general pain the patootie....
    >
    > I wore mine for my first two jobs...and when I got into pediatrics, I
    > never looked back. I haven't worn it since..and that has been over
    > 35 years ago.
    >
    > Mine looked like a sunbonnet, with the brim turned back and the bow
    > tied in back. It came from an old diploma school in Philly...and it
    > was a pain to clean, iron, and keep clean. It was a pain to put on,
    > and keep on..and gave me a headache by the end of the night. And when
    > one has been running all night, it didn't look so hot when it was
    > worn.
    >
    > Somewhere, in all my moves, it has disappeared. I would love one just
    > for sentimental reasons.... Maybe I could get one from my old
    > school.....if they are even made anymore...
    >
    > I know, we looked forward to the Capping ceremony. It was a big event
    > in our nursing lives....and at that time, symbolized a great deal.
    > Maybe that is why I still want one, even if I never wear one ever
    > again.
    >
    > Christine
    > --http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com


    Drifting farther -

    Christine - You'd think in the wealth and garbage of the InterWeb
    there would be a museum or catalog of the school caps. Did a quick
    yahoo and google images search for "nursing school caps" and "nurse
    caps". Not much. One woman waxing nostagic on flicker with a hat not
    her own.

    How many did a nurse own? Did they come from the school, or could you
    buy them from the uniform shop down from campus? I'm still hoping to
    find my mom's in one of these boxes or drawers.

    More drift -

    Like academic robes - you graduate from the right school, you are
    entitled to show up as faculty representive at Commencement like a
    Renaisance prince. Go through state universities like me, you can
    wear a bathrobe.

    OB Food -

    Smelled some great bean soup in a strange place, visiting my dad in
    the hospital. Came home, set some bones and trinity on for stock and
    hit the pantry. The first things I grabbed were lintels and barley.
    Close enough. Right here and fast. Decided we wanted the comfort
    food of porridge more than soup. Some canned tomatoes, pork sausage,
    frozen veg, some misc.. Not what I set out do, and, I am sorry to
    say, not as aromataic as the hospital food, but good. Leftovers for
    breakfast tommorrow - either cookded to greater mushiness, or fried
    like scrapple, or maybe both. With a fried egg.

    B

  14. #14
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On Thu, 14 May 2009 02:13:54 -0700 (PDT), bulka
    <[email protected]> wrote:



    >How many did a nurse own? Did they come from the school, or could you
    >buy them from the uniform shop down from campus? I'm still hoping to
    >find my mom's in one of these boxes or drawers.

    I only had one. It is probably gone forever. They came from the
    school and were distinct to each school.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  15. #15
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    On Thu, 14 May 2009 01:08:49 -0700 (PDT), bulka wrote:

    > On May 12, 6:50 am, Bobo Bonobo® <CLASS...@BRICK.NET> wrote:
    >> On May 12, 3:57 am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Chef Badges of Honor?

    >>
    >>> On some cooking programs I've seen a few hosts that have badges on their
    >>> sleeves.

    >>
    >>> What do they represent? They never zoom in close enough to tell.

    >>
    >>> I'm guessing it's a cooking school "diploma."

    >>
    >>> ??

    >>
    >> "The toque (chef's hat) dates back to the 16th century when hats were
    >> common in many trades. Different heights of hats indicate rank within
    >> a kitchen. The symbolism of the 100 folds of the toque are said to
    >> represent the many different ways a chef knows to cook an egg."
    >> source-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chef%27s_uniform
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> Andy

    >>
    >> --Bryan

    >
    > I'm trying to remember the name and author. Russian. Maybe Gogol.
    > Members of the Writers' Union were given fur hats, status matched by
    > the staus of the fur, from sable on down. The narrator discovers his
    > was made from a cat.
    >
    > B


    sounds like gogol. his 'diary of a madman' is one of the greatest things
    ever. 'the nose' is pretty funny, too.

    your pal,
    blake

  16. #16
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?



    Christine Dabney wrote:
    >
    > On Thu, 14 May 2009 03:35:10 -0400, Goomba <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >No, caps went the way of the dodo bird when they figured out that they
    > >were infection control nightmares. They got in the way of procedures,
    > >they were touching dirty hair, hands touched them then other
    > >things..yada yada yada. They were considered filthy messes and people
    > >wised up. Now the next infection control worry is male doctors neck
    > >ties. A bow tie is a good thing in medicine.

    >
    > Plus, they were a general pain the patootie....
    >
    > I wore mine for my first two jobs...and when I got into pediatrics, I
    > never looked back. I haven't worn it since..and that has been over
    > 35 years ago.
    >
    > Mine looked like a sunbonnet, with the brim turned back and the bow
    > tied in back. It came from an old diploma school in Philly...and it
    > was a pain to clean, iron, and keep clean. It was a pain to put on,
    > and keep on..and gave me a headache by the end of the night. And when
    > one has been running all night, it didn't look so hot when it was
    > worn.
    >
    > Somewhere, in all my moves, it has disappeared. I would love one just
    > for sentimental reasons.... Maybe I could get one from my old
    > school.....if they are even made anymore...
    >
    > I know, we looked forward to the Capping ceremony. It was a big event
    > in our nursing lives....and at that time, symbolized a great deal.
    > Maybe that is why I still want one, even if I never wear one ever
    > again.
    >
    > Christine



    AFAIK the UK nursing schools still give out 'their' caps at graduation.
    But they are rarely worn on a daily basis. Have seen them worn at
    'official' ceremonies etc but not in the hospitals.

  17. #17
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    Arri London wrote:

    > AFAIK the UK nursing schools still give out 'their' caps at graduation.
    > But they are rarely worn on a daily basis. Have seen them worn at
    > 'official' ceremonies etc but not in the hospitals.


    It is also traditional in the UK to receive ornate sterling belt buckles
    to wear with ones uniform dress. I was given one although I don't wear
    it, it is gorgeous.

  18. #18
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?



    Goomba wrote:
    >
    > Arri London wrote:
    >
    > > AFAIK the UK nursing schools still give out 'their' caps at graduation.
    > > But they are rarely worn on a daily basis. Have seen them worn at
    > > 'official' ceremonies etc but not in the hospitals.

    >
    > It is also traditional in the UK to receive ornate sterling belt buckles
    > to wear with ones uniform dress. I was given one although I don't wear
    > it, it is gorgeous.



    Yes think that is still done. But tend to see that on the senior sisters
    rather than the new graduates. When one has to change uniform several
    times a day, silver buckles aren't quite so practical.

  19. #19
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?

    Andy said...

    > Maybe it's some world recognition award in the culinary arts.
    >
    > I'm going to email the chef that wore one to ask, after I see his show
    > again.



    I just watched his cooking show. He's Nick Stellino a famous Italian chef!

    The program is called "Nick Stellino Cooking With Friends," and airs on PBS
    stations.

    I visited his website but through the gallery of images I could still not
    make out the emblem that's sewn onto many of his shirt sleeves. He does wear
    his "Nick Stellino" logo on the front of his shirt.

    The man is ultra-accomplished in the culinary arts, as evidenced by a "small
    selection" of videos and print articles he offers. I don't know why I've
    never heard of him until now.

    I truly enjoy his show. He cooks with the same unhurriedness and clarity as
    Lidia Bastianich does.

    I scoured his website www.nickstellino.com" but could not find an e-mail of
    his so the emblem on his sleeve for now will remain a secret.

    Best,

    Andy
    --
    Eat first, talk later.

  20. #20
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Chef Badges of Honor?


    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..

    > I just watched his cooking show. He's Nick Stellino a famous Italian chef!
    >
    > The program is called "Nick Stellino Cooking With Friends," and airs on
    > PBS
    > stations.
    >
    > I visited his website but through the gallery of images I could still not
    > make out the emblem that's sewn onto many of his shirt sleeves. He does
    > wear
    > his "Nick Stellino" logo on the front of his shirt.
    >
    > The man is ultra-accomplished in the culinary arts, as evidenced by a
    > "small
    > selection" of videos and print articles he offers. I don't know why I've
    > never heard of him until now.
    >
    > I truly enjoy his show. He cooks with the same unhurriedness and clarity
    > as
    > Lidia Bastianich does.
    >
    > I scoured his website www.nickstellino.com" but could not find an e-mail
    > of
    > his so the emblem on his sleeve for now will remain a secret.
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy


    Is this a new series, Andy? He was one about eight or ten years ago and
    had a cookbook that even included a CD of Italian music to enjoy during
    dinner.



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