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Thread: Cheesecake Sizes

  1. #1
    Rider Guest

    Default Cheesecake Sizes

    I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .

    Thanks

  2. #2
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    Rider wrote:
    > I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    > easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    > Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    > cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    > a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    > that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    > ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    > to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .
    >
    > Thanks


    you want the volume of a cylinder

    V = l*pi*r^2

    for 9" and 1" tall V is 254 cubic inches

    for 6" and 1" tall V is 113 cubic inches

    113/254 = .44 so it's actually a little less than half


  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On Thu, 6 Dec 2012 19:07:42 -0800 (PST), Rider wrote:

    > I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    > easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    > Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    > cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    > a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    > that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    > ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    > to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .


    You will have slightly more filling. Mathematically, you would need a
    6.4" pie tin.

    -sw

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On Fri, 7 Dec 2012 03:17:18 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle wrote:

    > Rider wrote:
    >> I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    >> easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    >> Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    >> cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    >> a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    >> that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    >> ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    >> to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > you want the volume of a cylinder
    >
    > V = l*pi*r^2
    >
    > for 9" and 1" tall V is 254 cubic inches
    >
    > for 6" and 1" tall V is 113 cubic inches
    >
    > 113/254 = .44 so it's actually a little less than half


    Since the edges of a pie pan are tapered, you need to calculate the
    areas of conical fustrams rather than cylinders. If you wanted to
    take a shortcut such as you did, simply do the math in 2 dimensions
    rather than 3 (that;'s what I did). Screw the cylinder.

    Area = cheesecake x radius^2

    -sw

  5. #5
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Fri, 7 Dec 2012 03:17:18 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle wrote:
    >
    >> Rider wrote:
    >>> I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    >>> easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    >>> Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    >>> cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    >>> a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    >>> that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    >>> ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    >>> to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >> you want the volume of a cylinder
    >>
    >> V = l*pi*r^2
    >>
    >> for 9" and 1" tall V is 254 cubic inches
    >>
    >> for 6" and 1" tall V is 113 cubic inches
    >>
    >> 113/254 = .44 so it's actually a little less than half

    >
    > Since the edges of a pie pan are tapered, you need to calculate the
    > areas of conical fustrams rather than cylinders. If you wanted to
    > take a shortcut such as you did, simply do the math in 2 dimensions
    > rather than 3 (that;'s what I did). Screw the cylinder.
    >
    > Area = cheesecake x radius^2
    >
    > -sw


    (your shortcut+critique)*(my shortcut+saying this)/stupid = neg. infinity


  6. #6
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    In article <[email protected]>,
    tert in seattle <[email protected]> wrote:

    > you want the volume of a cylinder
    >
    > V = l*pi*r^2
    >
    > for 9" and 1" tall V is 254 cubic inches
    >
    > for 6" and 1" tall V is 113 cubic inches
    >
    > 113/254 = .44 so it's actually a little less than half


    The ratio is correct. The cubic inches gleaned on the way to solving the
    problem are not. I wouldn't have noticed, but there are 231 cubic inches
    in a gallon and a little over a two quart fill in a six inch wide pie
    shell seemed excessive. All in good fun. Don't hate me. Some a**hole
    will always check your math if it's easy to do.

    leo

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On Thu, 6 Dec 2012 19:07:42 -0800 (PST), Rider <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    > easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    > Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    > cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    > a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    > that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    > ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    > to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .
    >
    > Thanks


    Do you need mathematical BS or do you want to cook? Figure out your
    volume, reduce your ingredients and go from there. Eggs thicken the
    liquid and you don't need a lot of eggs to do it. Bake low and slow,
    pretty much as stated in the recipe. Be prepared to baby sit your
    6-inch cheesecake the first time or two that you do it. You'll be
    okay after you understand how your oven bakes and egg/filling
    proportions for it.

    I've made small cheesecakes many times, so I know It's not a big
    mystery. Reduce the quantity and watch so it's not overcooked... then
    the next time you make one, you'll have a working idea of what to
    expect and the time frame to expect it in.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  8. #8
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On Thu, 6 Dec 2012 19:07:42 -0800 (PST), Rider <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    >easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    >Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    >cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    >a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    >that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    >ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    >to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .


    1. cheesecake might even get better once frozen. Just let it cool
    completely- then wrap in serving sizes and freeze.

    2. math is hard-- [and unreliable since we don't know if you're using
    pie plates or springform pans] Fill your 9" pan with water. fill
    your 6" pan with water. Make a fraction. See if you can make that
    work.

    Jim

  9. #9
    Krypsis Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On 7/12/2012 3:08 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Fri, 7 Dec 2012 03:17:18 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle wrote:
    >
    >> Rider wrote:
    >>> I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    >>> easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    >>> Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    >>> cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    >>> a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    >>> that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    >>> ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    >>> to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >> you want the volume of a cylinder
    >>
    >> V = l*pi*r^2
    >>
    >> for 9" and 1" tall V is 254 cubic inches
    >>
    >> for 6" and 1" tall V is 113 cubic inches
    >>
    >> 113/254 = .44 so it's actually a little less than half

    >
    > Since the edges of a pie pan are tapered, you need to calculate the
    > areas of conical fustrams rather than cylinders. If you wanted to
    > take a shortcut such as you did, simply do the math in 2 dimensions
    > rather than 3 (that;'s what I did). Screw the cylinder.
    >
    > Area = cheesecake x radius^2
    >
    > -sw
    >

    Heck, you make a simple operation unduly complex. Just halve the
    ingredients and be done with it. Cheesecake making isn't rocket science.
    Slap the appropriate quantity of the ingredients into a pan, then cook
    away. If you're out a tad, you'll know for the next time..

    --

    Krypsis

  10. #10
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 12/6/2012 10:07 PM, Rider wrote:
    > I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    > easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    > Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    > cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    > a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    > that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    > ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    > to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .
    >
    > Thanks



    You can make it any size by adjusting the baking time.

    Another nice presentation is individual cheesecakes made in a pan like
    this: http://preview.tinyurl.com/bk8mnav just click the lower link.

    Cheesecake freezes very well, so you could just take out as much as you
    want to use/serve.

    Susan

  11. #11
    S Viemeister Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On 12/7/2012 9:30 AM, Susan wrote:

    > Another nice presentation is individual cheesecakes made in a pan like
    > this: http://preview.tinyurl.com/bk8mnav just click the lower link.
    >

    I have one of those pans - I've used it to make individual layer cakes.



  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On Fri, 7 Dec 2012 07:21:29 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> On Fri, 7 Dec 2012 03:17:18 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle wrote:
    >>
    >>> Rider wrote:
    >>>> I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    >>>> easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    >>>> Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    >>>> cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    >>>> a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    >>>> that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    >>>> ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    >>>> to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks
    >>>
    >>> you want the volume of a cylinder
    >>>
    >>> V = l*pi*r^2
    >>>
    >>> for 9" and 1" tall V is 254 cubic inches
    >>>
    >>> for 6" and 1" tall V is 113 cubic inches
    >>>
    >>> 113/254 = .44 so it's actually a little less than half

    >>
    >> Since the edges of a pie pan are tapered, you need to calculate the
    >> areas of conical fustrams rather than cylinders. If you wanted to
    >> take a shortcut such as you did, simply do the math in 2 dimensions
    >> rather than 3 (that;'s what I did). Screw the cylinder.
    >>
    >> Area = cheesecake x radius^2
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > (your shortcut+critique)*(my shortcut+saying this)/stupid = neg. infinity


    Does not compute. Danger Will Robinson!

    -sw

  13. #13
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On 12/6/12 10:07 PM, Rider wrote:
    > I think
    > that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    > ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one.


    It may be difficult to halve the recipe, eggs in particular.

    Suggestion: make the entire recipe, bake two 6" cheesecakes, and freeze
    one. Cheesecake freezes really well.

    -- Larry


  14. #14
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 12/7/2012 10:17 AM, pltrgyst wrote:

    > It may be difficult to halve the recipe, eggs in particular.
    >


    Not at all; you just round up, no damage done.

    I don't even use a recipe for cheesecake any more; just an egg for each
    8 oz of cream cheese, lemon juice, sometimes zest as well, vanilla and
    sweetener.

    If you're that concerned about the egg, just use a smaller size. I use
    extra large without any adjustments, though.

    Susan

  15. #15
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On 12/6/2012 5:17 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
    > Rider wrote:
    >> I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    >> easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    >> Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    >> cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    >> a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    >> that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    >> ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    >> to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > you want the volume of a cylinder
    >
    > V = l*pi*r^2
    >
    > for 9" and 1" tall V is 254 cubic inches
    >
    > for 6" and 1" tall V is 113 cubic inches
    >
    > 113/254 = .44 so it's actually a little less than half
    >


    The radius of 9" and 6" cakes are 4.5" and 3". This however, makes no
    difference in your ratios which are correct. It doesn't matter much
    since most cheesecake recipes seem oblivious to the volume of the pans
    and are typically wrong anyway.

  16. #16
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    dsi1 wrote:
    > On 12/6/2012 5:17 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
    >> Rider wrote:
    >>> I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    >>> easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    >>> Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    >>> cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    >>> a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    >>> that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    >>> ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    >>> to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >> you want the volume of a cylinder
    >>
    >> V = l*pi*r^2
    >>
    >> for 9" and 1" tall V is 254 cubic inches
    >>
    >> for 6" and 1" tall V is 113 cubic inches
    >>
    >> 113/254 = .44 so it's actually a little less than half
    >>

    >
    > The radius of 9" and 6" cakes are 4.5" and 3". This however, makes no
    > difference in your ratios which are correct. It doesn't matter much
    > since most cheesecake recipes seem oblivious to the volume of the pans
    > and are typically wrong anyway.


    radius, diameter, whatever!

    math is hard!


  17. #17
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On 12/7/2012 9:36 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    > dsi1 wrote:
    >> On 12/6/2012 5:17 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
    >>> Rider wrote:
    >>>> I have recently started making cheesecakes. Actually they are a lot
    >>>> easier to make than I thought they would be, just time consuming.
    >>>> Anyway I have a question. All of the recipies that I have are for a 9"
    >>>> cake, That is a really large cheese cake and too large unless there is
    >>>> a large group of people, I would much rather cook a 6" cake. I think
    >>>> that I read somewhere, some time, ago that you can just halve the
    >>>> ingredients for a 9" cake to make a 6" one. Before I do that I figured
    >>>> to check in here and see if anyone agrees with this or not .
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks
    >>>
    >>> you want the volume of a cylinder
    >>>
    >>> V = l*pi*r^2
    >>>
    >>> for 9" and 1" tall V is 254 cubic inches
    >>>
    >>> for 6" and 1" tall V is 113 cubic inches
    >>>
    >>> 113/254 = .44 so it's actually a little less than half
    >>>

    >>
    >> The radius of 9" and 6" cakes are 4.5" and 3". This however, makes no
    >> difference in your ratios which are correct. It doesn't matter much
    >> since most cheesecake recipes seem oblivious to the volume of the pans
    >> and are typically wrong anyway.

    >
    > radius, diameter, whatever!
    >
    > math is hard!
    >


    I don't believe that I've ever used pi in cooking. I don't even use pi
    pans anymore.

  18. #18
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On 07/12/2012 2:36 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
    >>
    >>> you want the volume of a cylinder
    >>>
    >>> V = l*pi*r^2
    >>>
    >>> for 9" and 1" tall V is 254 cubic inches
    >>>
    >>> for 6" and 1" tall V is 113 cubic inches
    >>>
    >>> 113/254 = .44 so it's actually a little less than half
    >>>

    >>
    >> The radius of 9" and 6" cakes are 4.5" and 3". This however, makes no
    >> difference in your ratios which are correct. It doesn't matter much
    >> since most cheesecake recipes seem oblivious to the volume of the pans
    >> and are typically wrong anyway.

    >
    > radius, diameter, whatever!
    >
    > math is hard!
    >



    I would be more concerned about the changes to the cooking time. I used
    to make brownies with a recipe from Joy of Cooking. It called for a
    particular size of baking pan that but I used a larger one, which of
    course meant the batter did come up as high in the pan. It completely
    changed the texture of the brownies.

  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cheesecake Sizes

    On Fri, 07 Dec 2012 15:43:22 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > I would be more concerned about the changes to the cooking time. I used
    > to make brownies with a recipe from Joy of Cooking. It called for a
    > particular size of baking pan that but I used a larger one, which of
    > course meant the batter did come up as high in the pan. It completely
    > changed the texture of the brownies.


    That was your data point for later adjustments. Personally, I under
    bake my brownies because I prefer the "fudge" type. You'd use a knife
    to determine when cheesecakes are baked, just like with any other
    custard filling, then let them set up overnight in the refrigerator.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

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