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Thread: Cheese Planers

  1. #1
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Cheese Planers

    When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen implement
    called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather than pre-sliced
    cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese planer. I looked and it
    has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson. Swedish. Go figure It looks a
    little like this:

    http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2n

    So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table and am
    having one sent to him. This way he won't try to smuggle mine out of my
    house in his suitcase. LOL Besides, he's got a birthday coming up so what
    the heck, here honey, cut the cheese!

    Jill


  2. #2
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    On 8/7/2011 6:05 PM, jmcquown wrote:
    > When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen
    > implement called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather than
    > pre-sliced cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese planer. I
    > looked and it has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson. Swedish. Go figure
    > It looks a little like this:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2no
    > So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table and
    > am having one sent to him.



    Those work very well on semi-hard and hard cheeses. I really like the
    wooden handled ones. Every Swedish household I've ever been in has a
    number of these. Some of them have handles that match old silver
    patterns or Georg Jensen flatware.

    They can also be used to shave chocolate.


    gloria p

  3. #3
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers


    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j1nhrl$fau$[email protected]..
    > On 8/7/2011 6:05 PM, jmcquown wrote:
    >> When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen
    >> implement called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather than
    >> pre-sliced cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese planer. I
    >> looked and it has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson. Swedish. Go figure
    >> It looks a little like this:
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2no
    >> So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table and
    >> am having one sent to him.

    >
    >
    > Those work very well on semi-hard and hard cheeses. I really like the
    > wooden handled ones. Every Swedish household I've ever been in has a
    > number of these. Some of them have handles that match old silver patterns
    > or Georg Jensen flatware.
    >
    > They can also be used to shave chocolate.
    >
    >
    > gloria p


    Dang tiny URL! This is what I sent him:
    http://www.surlatable.com/product/PR...3/Cheese-Plane

    I've never been in a Swedish household but it does a nice job with Swiss and
    Cheddar. I never thought about shaving chocolate with it. Maybe I'll give
    it a try some time

    Jill


  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    On Sun, 07 Aug 2011 20:32:15 -0600, "gloria.p" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Those work very well on semi-hard and hard cheeses. I really like the
    > wooden handled ones. Every Swedish household I've ever been in has a
    > number of these. Some of them have handles that match old silver
    > patterns or Georg Jensen flatware.


    That's what the people we visited in Amsterdam used too. We aren't
    that civilized. We keep our cheese in the refrigerator and slice off
    a big hunk when we want to eat it (usually while standing over the
    cutting board).

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  5. #5
    Barry Lindin Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen
    > implement called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather than
    > pre-sliced cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese planer. I
    > looked and it has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson. Swedish. Go
    > figure It looks a little like this:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2n
    >
    > So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table
    > and am having one sent to him. This way he won't try to smuggle mine
    > out of my house in his suitcase. LOL Besides, he's got a birthday
    > coming up so what the heck, here honey, cut the cheese!
    >
    > Jill
    >


    wow. that john fella is one lucky coot!

  6. #6
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    On 8/8/2011 12:11 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:j1nhrl$fau$[email protected]..
    >> On 8/7/2011 6:05 PM, jmcquown wrote:
    >>> When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen
    >>> implement called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather than
    >>> pre-sliced cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese planer. I
    >>> looked and it has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson. Swedish. Go figure
    >>> It looks a little like this:
    >>>
    >>> http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2no
    >>> So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table and
    >>> am having one sent to him.

    >>
    >>
    >> Those work very well on semi-hard and hard cheeses. I really like the
    >> wooden handled ones. Every Swedish household I've ever been in has a
    >> number of these. Some of them have handles that match old silver
    >> patterns or Georg Jensen flatware.
    >>
    >> They can also be used to shave chocolate.
    >>
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > Dang tiny URL! This is what I sent him:
    > http://www.surlatable.com/product/PR...3/Cheese-Plane
    >
    > I've never been in a Swedish household but it does a nice job with Swiss
    > and Cheddar. I never thought about shaving chocolate with it. Maybe I'll
    > give it a try some time
    >


    When we married in the 60's we bought our household equipment in
    Scandinavian import
    stores (mostly "Scan", owned by the local coop). Our cutlery included a
    cheese plane and it still works very well.


    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  7. #7
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers


    "Barry Lindin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 0.162...
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table
    >> and am having one sent to him. This way he won't try to smuggle mine
    >> out of my house in his suitcase. LOL Besides, he's got a birthday
    >> coming up so what the heck, here honey, cut the cheese!
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>

    >
    > wow. that john fella is one lucky coot!



    Sarcasm? How quaint. Actually I'm the lucky one. He buys all the
    groceries when he's here. Cheese included : )

    Jill


  8. #8
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    On Sun, 7 Aug 2011 20:05:56 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen implement
    >called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather than pre-sliced
    >cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese planer. I looked and it
    >has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson. Swedish. Go figure It looks a
    >little like this:
    >
    >http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2n
    >
    >So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table and am
    >having one sent to him. This way he won't try to smuggle mine out of my
    >house in his suitcase. LOL Besides, he's got a birthday coming up so what
    >the heck, here honey, cut the cheese!


    I think that's way over priced for an ordinary cheese plane.
    http://www.amazon.com/Fox-Run-Wooden...2816605&sr=8-1

    Actually I've seen those cheese planes at the 99 stores. I know some
    can be pricey, those with ruby encrusted handles... but otherwise they
    are all the same.

    I have a cheese plane that cuts with a wire, I got it many years ago
    as a freebie from Chef's Catalog. It works fine especially on soft
    cheeses (cheese planes like yours don't work well on soft cheeses) but
    I rarely use it, I much prefer an ordinary paring knife... not an hour
    ago I sliced cream cheese with a paring knife, used it as a spreader
    too... one tool to wash. I only buy block cheese, last I bought
    sliced were those singles when my daughter was a tot, more than 40
    years ago. I haven't used this in so long I almost gave up looking
    for it, was way in the back of one of my junk drawers, needs
    cleaning... I had forgotten that it has two wires for two different
    thicknesses:
    http://i54.tinypic.com/2i9nwgp.jpg

    I hope you packaged that cheese plane for your honey bunny with some
    good cheese to plane... tell him it'll get all gummed up with
    Velveeta. LOL

  9. #9
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > On Sun, 7 Aug 2011 20:05:56 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen implement
    >> called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather than pre-sliced
    >> cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese planer. I looked and it
    >> has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson. Swedish. Go figure It looks a
    >> little like this:
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2n
    >>
    >> So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table and am
    >> having one sent to him. This way he won't try to smuggle mine out of my
    >> house in his suitcase. LOL Besides, he's got a birthday coming up so what
    >> the heck, here honey, cut the cheese!

    >
    > I think that's way over priced for an ordinary cheese plane.
    > http://www.amazon.com/Fox-Run-Wooden...2816605&sr=8-1
    >
    > Actually I've seen those cheese planes at the 99 stores. I know some
    > can be pricey, those with ruby encrusted handles... but otherwise they
    > are all the same.
    >
    > I have a cheese plane that cuts with a wire, I got it many years ago
    > as a freebie from Chef's Catalog. It works fine especially on soft
    > cheeses (cheese planes like yours don't work well on soft cheeses) but
    > I rarely use it, I much prefer an ordinary paring knife... not an hour
    > ago I sliced cream cheese with a paring knife, used it as a spreader
    > too... one tool to wash. I only buy block cheese, last I bought
    > sliced were those singles when my daughter was a tot, more than 40
    > years ago. I haven't used this in so long I almost gave up looking
    > for it, was way in the back of one of my junk drawers, needs
    > cleaning... I had forgotten that it has two wires for two different
    > thicknesses:
    > http://i54.tinypic.com/2i9nwgp.jpg
    >
    > I hope you packaged that cheese plane for your honey bunny with some
    > good cheese to plane... tell him it'll get all gummed up with
    > Velveeta. LOL



    Good old fashioned potato peeler works better than a wire or a planer
    for slicing cheese. Try it. There will only be one thickness that it
    really works at tho' (seems to depend on how hard and dry the cheese is)

    Bob

  10. #10
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 08:19:58 -0400, James Silverton wrote:

    > On 8/8/2011 12:11 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >> Dang tiny URL! This is what I sent him:
    >> http://www.surlatable.com/product/PR...3/Cheese-Plane
    >>
    >> I've never been in a Swedish household but it does a nice job with Swiss
    >> and Cheddar. I never thought about shaving chocolate with it. Maybe I'll
    >> give it a try some time
    >>

    >
    > When we married in the 60's we bought our household equipment in
    > Scandinavian import
    > stores (mostly "Scan", owned by the local coop). Our cutlery included a
    > cheese plane and it still works very well.


    i miss the scan stores. i bought a fair amount of 'ready-to-assemble'
    furniture there.

    your pal,
    blake

  11. #11
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> On Sun, 7 Aug 2011 20:05:56 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen
    >>> implement called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather
    >>> than pre-sliced cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese
    >>> planer. I looked and it has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson.
    >>> Swedish. Go figure It looks a little like this:
    >>>
    >>> http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2n
    >>>
    >>> So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table
    >>> and am having one sent to him. This way he won't try to smuggle
    >>> mine out of my house in his suitcase. LOL Besides, he's got a
    >>> birthday coming up so what the heck, here honey, cut the cheese!

    >>
    >> I think that's way over priced for an ordinary cheese plane.
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Fox-Run-Wooden...003C5M4LS/ref=
    >> sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1312816605&sr=8-1
    >>
    >> Actually I've seen those cheese planes at the 99 stores. I know
    >> some can be pricey, those with ruby encrusted handles... but
    >> otherwise they are all the same.
    >>
    >> I have a cheese plane that cuts with a wire, I got it many years ago
    >> as a freebie from Chef's Catalog. It works fine especially on soft
    >> cheeses (cheese planes like yours don't work well on soft cheeses)
    >> but I rarely use it, I much prefer an ordinary paring knife... not an
    >> hour ago I sliced cream cheese with a paring knife, used it as a
    >> spreader too... one tool to wash. I only buy block cheese, last I
    >> bought sliced were those singles when my daughter was a tot, more
    >> than 40 years ago. I haven't used this in so long I almost gave up
    >> looking for it, was way in the back of one of my junk drawers, needs
    >> cleaning... I had forgotten that it has two wires for two different
    >> thicknesses:
    >> http://i54.tinypic.com/2i9nwgp.jpg
    >>
    >> I hope you packaged that cheese plane for your honey bunny with some
    >> good cheese to plane... tell him it'll get all gummed up with
    >> Velveeta. LOL

    >
    >
    > Good old fashioned potato peeler works better than a wire or a planer
    > for slicing cheese. Try it. There will only be one thickness that it
    > really works at tho' (seems to depend on how hard and dry the cheese
    > is)



    I've got one similar to Jill's model but it's better suited to slicing
    truffles. At least that's how I saw it used.

    I use the cheapo wire/roller slicer since I can easily adjust cheese
    slice thickness and get wider slices at the same time. Working at the
    crepe restaurant I had to slice up a 50lb block of Monterey Jack cheese
    daily. If I had to use that narrow plane, it would probably take all day.

    Who wants cheese slivers and crackers anyway?

    Andy

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 12:08:16 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Who wants cheese slivers and crackers anyway?


    Those thin cheese slices go well with bread. It's very civilized.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  13. #13
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen
    > implement called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather than
    > pre-sliced cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese planer.
    > I looked and it has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson. Swedish. Go
    > figure It looks a little like this:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2n
    >
    > So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table
    > and am having one sent to him. This way he won't try to smuggle mine
    > out of my house in his suitcase. LOL Besides, he's got a birthday
    > coming up so what the heck, here honey, cut the cheese!


    Mine looks almost idential. I have 2 of them so when one is in the
    dishwasher, we have another. Nice job on hard or semi-hard cheeses.
    The sort that use a string are just too finicky for that application.


    --


  14. #14
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    sf wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 12:08:16 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Who wants cheese slivers and crackers anyway?

    >
    > Those thin cheese slices go well with bread. It's very civilized.


    Yup. And even with my medical issues, I can use the cheese planes
    quite well to make a grill cheese samwich. Just layer them up a bit
    (grin). The ones i have slice about like the pre-sliced packaged
    cheeses come but I like a bit more so go with a sort of 1/2 layer extra.

    --


  15. #15
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 11:12:25 -0500, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> On Sun, 7 Aug 2011 20:05:56 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen implement
    >>> called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather than pre-sliced
    >>> cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese planer. I looked and it
    >>> has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson. Swedish. Go figure It looks a
    >>> little like this:
    >>>
    >>> http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2n
    >>>
    >>> So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table and am
    >>> having one sent to him. This way he won't try to smuggle mine out of my
    >>> house in his suitcase. LOL Besides, he's got a birthday coming up so what
    >>> the heck, here honey, cut the cheese!

    >>
    >> I think that's way over priced for an ordinary cheese plane.
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Fox-Run-Wooden...2816605&sr=8-1
    >>
    >> Actually I've seen those cheese planes at the 99 stores. I know some
    >> can be pricey, those with ruby encrusted handles... but otherwise they
    >> are all the same.
    >>
    >> I have a cheese plane that cuts with a wire, I got it many years ago
    >> as a freebie from Chef's Catalog. It works fine especially on soft
    >> cheeses (cheese planes like yours don't work well on soft cheeses) but
    >> I rarely use it, I much prefer an ordinary paring knife... not an hour
    >> ago I sliced cream cheese with a paring knife, used it as a spreader
    >> too... one tool to wash. I only buy block cheese, last I bought
    >> sliced were those singles when my daughter was a tot, more than 40
    >> years ago. I haven't used this in so long I almost gave up looking
    >> for it, was way in the back of one of my junk drawers, needs
    >> cleaning... I had forgotten that it has two wires for two different
    >> thicknesses:
    >> http://i54.tinypic.com/2i9nwgp.jpg
    >>
    >> I hope you packaged that cheese plane for your honey bunny with some
    >> good cheese to plane... tell him it'll get all gummed up with
    >> Velveeta. LOL

    >
    >
    >Good old fashioned potato peeler works better than a wire or a planer
    >for slicing cheese. Try it. There will only be one thickness that it
    >really works at tho' (seems to depend on how hard and dry the cheese is)
    >
    >Bob


    A paring knife is the most versatile, I can cut any thickness, and
    it's more sanitary, those cheese planes require handling the cheese
    with the other hand... I don't like them for company... all those
    filthy hands... for company I cut cubes in advance and toothpics are
    cheap.

  16. #16
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers


    "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 7 Aug 2011 20:05:56 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>When John was here in June he fell in love with a little kitchen implement
    >>called a cheese planer. I buy blocks of cheese rather than pre-sliced
    >>cheese. I have to admit, this ia s great cheese planer. I looked and it
    >>has a hallmark - Karlsson & Nilsson. Swedish. Go figure It looks a
    >>little like this:
    >>
    >>http://tinyurl.com/3w3ly2n
    >>
    >>So I looked it up. I found something similar online at Sur la Table and
    >>am
    >>having one sent to him. This way he won't try to smuggle mine out of my
    >>house in his suitcase. LOL Besides, he's got a birthday coming up so what
    >>the heck, here honey, cut the cheese!

    >
    > I think that's way over priced for an ordinary cheese plane.
    > http://www.amazon.com/Fox-Run-Wooden...2816605&sr=8-1
    >
    > Actually I've seen those cheese planes at the 99 stores. I know some
    > can be pricey, those with ruby encrusted handles... but otherwise they
    > are all the same.
    >
    > I have a cheese plane that cuts with a wire, I got it many years ago
    > as a freebie from Chef's Catalog. It works fine especially on soft
    > cheeses (cheese planes like yours don't work well on soft cheeses)



    I rarely buy soft cheeses so the point is moot.


    > I rarely use it, I much prefer an ordinary paring knife... not an hour
    > ago I sliced cream cheese with a paring knife, used it as a spreader
    > too... one tool to wash.
    > I hope you packaged that cheese plane for your honey bunny with some
    > good cheese to plane... tell him it'll get all gummed up with
    > Velveeta. LOL



    My "honey bunny" has probably never bought Velveeta. John prefers swiss
    cheese or extra sharp cheddar, in blocks I found a planer like you
    posted but when I went to buy it it said "out of stock". So I got the one
    from Sur la Table. More expensive? Sure. But he's worth it.

    Jill


  17. #17
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    On Mon, 8 Aug 2011 18:25:28 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > So I got the one from Sur la Table. More expensive? Sure. But he's worth it.


    LOL

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  18. #18
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers


    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > sf wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 12:08:16 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > Who wants cheese slivers and crackers anyway?

    >>
    >> Those thin cheese slices go well with bread. It's very civilized.

    >
    > Yup. And even with my medical issues, I can use the cheese planes
    > quite well to make a grill cheese samwich. Just layer them up a bit
    > (grin). The ones i have slice about like the pre-sliced packaged
    > cheeses come but I like a bit more so go with a sort of 1/2 layer extra.
    >
    > --
    >

    The planer I have makes the perfect thickness for cheese toast, especially
    yummy on sourdough bread! But yes, John used it to make grilled cheese
    sandwiches I use it to slice swiss cheese for burgers.


  19. #19
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 8 Aug 2011 18:25:28 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> So I got the one from Sur la Table. More expensive? Sure. But he's
    >> worth it.

    >
    > LOL
    >

    The cheap one was out of stock. Something funny about my being willing to
    spend more?


  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Planers

    On Tue, 9 Aug 2011 01:58:06 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > On Mon, 8 Aug 2011 18:25:28 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> So I got the one from Sur la Table. More expensive? Sure. But he's
    > >> worth it.

    > >
    > > LOL
    > >

    > The cheap one was out of stock. Something funny about my being willing to
    > spend more?


    The expensive one was what? $20? I just got a kick out of what you
    said. I would have said the same thing about something inexpensive
    that I bought for my husband, so the way you phrased it tickled me.
    That's all. Nothing more, nothing less.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

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