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Thread: Cheese Cutter

  1. #1
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Cheese Cutter

    I really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar (which Bill has every day
    in his lunch) because it creates less drag, and I've actually cut
    myself with the *back* of the blade a time or two when I was a bit
    careless. Time to find a dedicated weapon.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines


    To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"

  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    >works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    >not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    >knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar (which Bill has every day
    >in his lunch) because it creates less drag, and I've actually cut
    >myself with the *back* of the blade a time or two when I was a bit
    >careless. Time to find a dedicated weapon.


    I almost always use a regular butterknife (a.k.a. table setting knife) from
    our silverware set for slicing cheese. Cheese does not require a sharp
    knife (with some exceptions), and all using a good kitchen knife
    (such as a boning knife) does is dull the knife really fast.

    This does not work for a very hard aged cheese, however.

    Steve

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On Sat, 24 Jul 2010 18:09:09 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:

    > I really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    > works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    > not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    > knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar (which Bill has every day
    > in his lunch) because it creates less drag, and I've actually cut
    > myself with the *back* of the blade a time or two when I was a bit
    > careless. Time to find a dedicated weapon.


    I just use a knife or a grater (grater has a slicer on it). For
    parmesan and manchego I can also use a serrated veggie peeler.
    For chef salads, I have a julliener peeler that works on 1.5"
    thick (or less) cheese like cheddars or jack.

    -sw

  4. #4
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On 2010-07-25, Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:

    > not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    > knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar.....


    The thinner the blade, the less resistance and sticking. Wire is
    good, but beware. I paid big bucks for a wire "slicer" with all
    stainless steel base and handle and wire and....

    The freakin' wire unraveled rendering the whole shebang useless. It
    came with an extra wire, but so what!? PIA!!

    nb

  5. #5
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On Jul 24, 9:09*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@spambot.com> wrote:
    > I really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    > works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    > not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    > knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar (which Bill has every day
    > in his lunch) because it creates less drag, and I've actually cut
    > myself with the *back* of the blade a time or two when I was a bit
    > careless. Time to find a dedicated weapon.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >
    > --
    >
    > "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    > if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    > and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    > it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines
    >
    > To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"



    Probably the best choice is a cheese knife - curved blade with lots of
    holes in it to reduce drag.

    I also own the planer and the wire type.

  6. #6
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On Sat, 24 Jul 2010 18:09:09 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    >works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    >not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    >knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar (which Bill has every day
    >in his lunch) because it creates less drag, and I've actually cut
    >myself with the *back* of the blade a time or two when I was a bit
    >careless. Time to find a dedicated weapon.
    >
    >Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd



    You know that everything under the sun is on the Internet these days..
    there are a lot of options at this link.

    http://www.cheeseslicing.com/site/681068/page/45029

    My favorite wire cutter is nowhere to be found for sale online. I got
    it from Martha Stewart's offerings many years ago and it is similar
    to, but not quite like this:

    http://www.cooking.com/products/shpr...=FROOGLE694563

    Mine had 3 wires (the above has 2), each for a different thickness of
    cutting cheeses. It is by Amco, is stainless and quite hefty. I can
    find a photo, but no availability, dang it. Perhaps someone knows if
    it is still sold.

    http://www.amazon.com/Amco-10167-Tri.../dp/B00004RFIZ

    Boron

  7. #7
    PL Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    > works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    > not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    > knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar (which Bill has every day
    > in his lunch) because it creates less drag, and I've actually cut
    > myself with the *back* of the blade a time or two when I was a bit
    > careless. Time to find a dedicated weapon.
    >



    We just use our old bone handled bread and butter knives. (Only 'sharp' on
    one side ;-)


    But if the cheese is that hard you're needing to stick your fingers on top of
    the knife to force it through, you need to let it come to room temp for a lot
    longer. I leave all my cheeses out for at least 2-3 hours (sometimes longer
    depending on outside temp) before serving.


    But for hard cheeses like your cheddar, straight out of the fridge, just use
    a *one sided* sharp knife..... or a heavy 'chinese' chopper.




    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    I didn't fight my way to the top of the food chain to be a vegetarian.

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On Sat, 24 Jul 2010 18:09:09 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    > works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    > not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    > knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar (which Bill has every day
    > in his lunch) because it creates less drag, and I've actually cut
    > myself with the *back* of the blade a time or two when I was a bit
    > careless. Time to find a dedicated weapon.
    >

    I just use my french chef's knife, nothing fancy. It worked just fine
    on some aged Gouda this week. The trick is to cut thin slices with a
    sharp knife.

    --

    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On Sat, 24 Jul 2010 21:37:05 -0400, Boron Elgar
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Mine had 3 wires (the above has 2), each for a different thickness of
    > cutting cheeses. It is by Amco, is stainless and quite hefty. I can
    > find a photo, but no availability, dang it. Perhaps someone knows if
    > it is still sold.


    I've never used more wire than just a single one. I thought the whole
    trick to thickness was the angle of the roller to the wire.

    --

    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  10. #10
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On Jul 24, 9:45*pm, PL <Pet...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus> wrote:
    > Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@spambot.com> wrote innews:[email protected]:
    >
    > > I really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    > > works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    > > not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    > > knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar (which Bill has every day
    > > in his lunch) because it creates less drag, and I've actually cut
    > > myself with the *back* of the blade a time or two when I was a bit
    > > careless. Time to find a dedicated weapon.

    >
    > We just use our old bone handled bread and butter knives. (Only 'sharp' on
    > one side ;-)
    >
    > But if the cheese is that hard you're needing to stick your fingers on top of
    > the knife to force it through, you need to let it come to room temp for alot
    > longer. I leave all my cheeses out for at least 2-3 hours (sometimes longer
    > depending on outside temp) before serving.
    >
    > But for hard cheeses like your cheddar, straight out of the fridge, just use
    > a *one sided* sharp knife..... or a heavy 'chinese' chopper.
    >
    > --
    > Peter Lucas
    > Brisbane
    > Australia
    >
    > I didn't fight my way to the top of the food chain to be a vegetarian.


    ==
    Commercially, I used to use steel piano wire and a hardwood dowel to
    cut 10 lb. blocks of well aged cheddar. Even when cold this worked for
    me and I cut up one pile of cheese every week.
    ==

  11. #11
    atec77 Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On 25/07/2010 11:09 AM, Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > I really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    > works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    > not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    > knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar (which Bill has every day
    > in his lunch) because it creates less drag, and I've actually cut
    > myself with the *back* of the blade a time or two when I was a bit
    > careless. Time to find a dedicated weapon.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >

    I keep a large wide blade steak knife about 12"long
    it does cheeses as well very easily
    slices pizza pretty well also

    --
    X-No-Archive: Yes

  12. #12
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    For thin slices of cheese, I use a Wusthof cheese plane, it works great
    but the cheese is very thin.. For thicker slices, I use a KitchenAid
    Professional cheese slicer, it is a wire.

    Becca

  13. #13
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On Sat, 24 Jul 2010 22:00:10 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 24 Jul 2010 21:37:05 -0400, Boron Elgar
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Mine had 3 wires (the above has 2), each for a different thickness of
    >> cutting cheeses. It is by Amco, is stainless and quite hefty. I can
    >> find a photo, but no availability, dang it. Perhaps someone knows if
    >> it is still sold.

    >
    >I've never used more wire than just a single one. I thought the whole
    >trick to thickness was the angle of the roller to the wire.



    The one I use is a bit unusual and the wires so taut, even after all
    these years of use, that one can truly use the 3 sides (the handle is
    triangular) to vary the thickness.

    In single wire cutters I have had, either adjustable wire with roller
    or "freestanding" wire, indeed, the thickness is controlled by the
    hand movements. It is one of the things I adore about this cutter.

    When I went to dig out this thing to get the brand name, I realized
    just how many cheese cutter I had..not just the wire ones (3 of them),
    but two full sets of knives that have blades particular to types of
    cheese.

    Did I mention we're very fond of cheese at this house?

    Boron

  14. #14
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    >Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >
    >> I really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    >> works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    >> not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning
    >> knife on the harder cheeses, such as cheddar (which Bill has every day
    >> in his lunch) because it creates less drag, and I've actually cut
    >> myself with the *back* of the blade a time or two when I was a bit
    >> careless. Time to find a dedicated weapon.


    You're obviously a low class no account hoggish whore. Regardless how
    hard the cheese don't be such a ****ing PIG... simply cut smaller
    slices, not thinner, just not the entire area of the cheese, cut half
    slices or third slices, cut at an angle alternately from each side of
    the block/wedge... an ordinary paring knife will do... stop hacking
    off full slabs, demonstrate some daintiness, you uncouth beastie.
    Don't yoose have any common sense... sheesh, I gotta teach yoose
    moroons everything... does yer mommy still gotta cut your food on yer
    plate... must be embarrassing dining out with you. I bet you're one
    of those drooling pinheads who hacks into the middle of a stick of
    butter, like it's all yours, with no consideration for others with the
    mess you leave... typical snobbish JAP, I bet you don't flush the
    toilet.

  15. #15
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 08:53:12 -0400, Boron Elgar
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Did I mention we're very fond of cheese at this house?


    Sounds like it!

    My husband was a cheese hound too. He thought he was fine because he
    was in shape and not overweight. Guess who ended up with high
    cholesterol and a serious heart problem? It wasn't me. So whatever
    you do, be careful.

    --

    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  16. #16
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    On Sat, 24 Jul 2010 21:37:05 -0400, Boron Elgar
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You know that everything under the sun is on the Internet these days..
    >there are a lot of options at this link.


    <snip>

    Your post inspired me to google around for wire-based cheese cutters.
    In the one-thing-leads-to-another department, a mandoline popped up.
    Snap! I buzzed into the kitchen (Bill's sitting at the counter,
    blearily reading the Sunday paper) and grabbed my Oxo hand mandoline
    (which is handy as hell, BTW) and the tag end of cheddar in the
    reefer. I ran off a few slices, all the while Bill is (blearily)
    watching me with a "WTF" expression on his face. When I told him my
    cheese slicer search saga, his only comment on the cheese slices was,
    "It's not even." It rolls off thicker on one side than the other. The
    man has a serious case of OCD with Certain Things and this is one of
    them. His law partner wandered into his office one day while he was
    eating the lunch I'd made him, and he had about a dozen Wheat Thins
    spread out with an equal number of cheddar cheese squares perched on
    each, in military ranks, as it were. And that's just crackers and
    cheese. You oughta see his closet... (former Marine and never got over
    it).

    Oh, and I've ordered
    http://www.amazon.com/R%C3%B6sle-127...0079779&sr=1-6

    The Amco in your post was unavailable, but thanks for the idea!

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines


    To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"

  17. #17
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    "Terry Pulliam Burd" wrote

    > really need to find a good cheese cutter - knife, wire, whatever
    > works best. Anyone have a recommendation for one for everyday service,
    > not "pretty" for company, just a work horse. I've often used my boning


    I use something like this:

    http://www.amazon.com/Anolon-52201-C...0080507&sr=8-3

    Or: http://tinyurl.com/345xrnk

    Thats simple and works for most of my needs. I have several of them.



  18. #18
    JL Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:

    > On Sat, 24 Jul 2010 21:37:05 -0400, Boron Elgar
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    > >You know that everything under the sun is on the Internet these days..
    > >there are a lot of options at this link.

    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Your post inspired me to google around for wire-based cheese cutters.
    > In the one-thing-leads-to-another department, a mandoline popped up.
    > Snap! I buzzed into the kitchen (Bill's sitting at the counter,
    > blearily reading the Sunday paper) and grabbed my Oxo hand mandoline
    > (which is handy as hell, BTW) and the tag end of cheddar in the
    > reefer. I ran off a few slices, all the while Bill is (blearily)
    > watching me with a "WTF" expression on his face. When I told him my
    > cheese slicer search saga, his only comment on the cheese slices was,
    > "It's not even." It rolls off thicker on one side than the other. The
    > man has a serious case of OCD with Certain Things and this is one of
    > them. His law partner wandered into his office one day while he was
    > eating the lunch I'd made him, and he had about a dozen Wheat Thins
    > spread out with an equal number of cheddar cheese squares perched on
    > each, in military ranks, as it were. And that's just crackers and
    > cheese. You oughta see his closet... (former Marine and never got over
    > it).
    >
    > Oh, and I've ordered
    > http://www.amazon.com/R%C3%B6sle-127...0079779&sr=1-6
    >
    > The Amco in your post was unavailable, but thanks for the idea!
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >

    Hmmmm.....i have one of those wire cheese cutters, have had for years,
    but, i used to think it was a shame that it made uneven and rather thick
    slices, great for griled cheese & cheeseburgers and cooking but not so
    good for thin sandwich slices.

    Then after a good 5 years or more of use i some how became suddenly
    aware of the slice size setting mechanism for adjusting slice thickness

    But then im former USN and even though FMSS'ed i guess it did'nt take


    --

    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  19. #19
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My husband was a cheese hound too. He thought he was fine because he
    >was in shape and not overweight. Guess who ended up with high
    >cholesterol and a serious heart problem? It wasn't me. So whatever
    >you do, be careful.


    My last HDL reading was lower than I would like. I'm looking for
    dietary ways to improve it. Anyone have any ideas?


    Steve

  20. #20
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Cheese Cutter

    "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:i2huvr$oev$[email protected]..
    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > My last HDL reading was lower than I would like. I'm looking for
    > dietary ways to improve it. Anyone have any ideas?
    >


    Looks like there may not be any foods that raise HDL, even though there are
    some that could lower LDL.

    Check this out: Alcohol in moderation could raise HDL. I wonder why?
    http://cholesterol.emedtv.com/hdl/fo...raise-hdl.html

    "While several foods have been proven to lower LDL cholesterol, no foods
    that raise HDL consistently have been found. Foods containing omega-3 fatty
    acids (such as fatty fish) have been shown to have heart benefits; however,
    they do not increase HDL"
    [...]
    "Moderate alcohol has been shown to increase HDL; however, it does not lower
    LDL."



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