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Thread: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

  1. #1
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

    My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally delicious.

    She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup over it.

    Anybody got anything on these?

    MartyB



  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

    On Tue 05 Oct 2010 05:01:31p, Nunya Bidnits told us...

    > My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally
    > delicious.
    >
    > She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup over
    > it.
    >
    > Anybody got anything on these?
    >
    > MartyB
    >
    >
    >


    Nope, I associate both of these with some degree of sweetness.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  3. #3
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel


    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Tue 05 Oct 2010 05:01:31p, Nunya Bidnits told us...
    >
    >> My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally
    >> delicious.
    >>
    >> She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup over
    >> it.
    >>
    >> Anybody got anything on these?
    >>
    >> MartyB
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Nope, I associate both of these with some degree of sweetness.


    Yeah, I know it's unusual and perhaps there's a hint in the blintzes but its
    very faint. So it's what I would call traditional, but I can't question her
    Jewish Mother street cred and I really liked her cooking. The noodle kugel
    was pretty simple, almost like a fine hash brown pie and you just put it in
    a bowl and pour in the soup. She could make a perfect matzoh ball from
    scratch too, soft outside, dense center. Yum.

    MartyB



  4. #4
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

    On Tue 05 Oct 2010 06:23:56p, Nunya Bidnits told us...

    >
    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Tue 05 Oct 2010 05:01:31p, Nunya Bidnits told us...
    >>
    >>> My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally
    >>> delicious.
    >>>
    >>> She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup
    >>> over it.
    >>>
    >>> Anybody got anything on these?
    >>>
    >>> MartyB
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Nope, I associate both of these with some degree of sweetness.

    >
    > Yeah, I know it's unusual and perhaps there's a hint in the
    > blintzes but its very faint. So it's what I would call
    > traditional, but I can't question her Jewish Mother street cred
    > and I really liked her cooking. The noodle kugel was pretty
    > simple, almost like a fine hash brown pie and you just put it in
    > a bowl and pour in the soup. She could make a perfect matzoh ball
    > from scratch too, soft outside, dense center. Yum.
    >
    > MartyB
    >
    >
    >


    Actually, the filling in cheese blintzes is usually not all that
    sweet. It's what you put *on* them that contributes most of the
    sweetness. The kugel sounds interesting, although I've never had one
    like that. Noodles and chicken go together like bagels and lox.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  5. #5
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

    On 10/5/2010 7:01 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally delicious.


    savory potato blintzes I've heard of but cheese blintzes are generally
    sweet.

    > She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup over it.


    noodle kugel pie? With chicken soup on top? Maybe she fried her luckshin
    into a lump?

    > Anybody got anything on these?


    Not I. where in Europe did her family come from?


    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  6. #6
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

    On 10/5/2010 8:23 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > She could make a perfect matzoh ball from
    > scratch too, soft outside, dense center. Yum.


    Is there any other way to make them than from scratch?

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  7. #7
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

    On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 00:27:50 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue 05 Oct 2010 05:01:31p, Nunya Bidnits told us...
    >
    >> My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally
    >> delicious.
    >>
    >> She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup over
    >> it.
    >>
    >> Anybody got anything on these?
    >>
    >> MartyB
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Nope, I associate both of these with some degree of sweetness.


    Blintzes and kugels can be sweet, savory, and anything between.

    http://www.cyber-kitchen.com/rfcj/ca...ategory=KUGELS

    http://www.cyber-kitchen.com/cgibin/...nocpp=1&Rank=1

  8. #8
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

    On 10/5/2010 8:30 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > Actually, the filling in cheese blintzes is usually not all that
    > sweet. It's what you put *on* them that contributes most of the
    > sweetness. The kugel sounds interesting, although I've never had one
    > like that. Noodles and chicken go together like bagels and lox.
    >


    Jennie Grossinger used a little sugar:


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Blintzes - Cheese Filling

    Recipe By :Jennie Grossinger
    Serving Size : 1 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : * Jewish Blintzes

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    2 cups Drained cottage cheese
    1 Egg yolk
    3/4 teaspoon Salt
    1 tablespoon Melted butter
    2 tablespoons Sugar -- (optional)
    1 teaspoon Lemon juice -- (optional)

    Beat the cheese, egg yolk, salt and butter together. Add the sugar
    or lemon juice if you like -- some people like them sweet, some don't.
    Fill pancakes.

    Recipe Source:
    THE ART OF JEWISH COOKING by Jennie Grossinger
    Published by Bantam Books, Inc. (c) 1958

    Formatted for MasterCook by Joe Comiskey, aka MR MAD -
    [email protected] -or- [email protected]

    03-22-1995


    The Jewish Home Beautiful has this one:


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    BLINTZES

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : doughs and pastries one-dish meals
    Side Dishes

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    Batter
    2 eggs
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1/2 teaspoon sugar
    1 cup water
    1 cup flour
    1/4 teaspoon baking powder

    Filling
    3/4 lb. cottage cheese
    1 egg
    1 tbsp. sugar
    1/8 tsp. cinnamon
    1 pinch salt
    1 tsp. grated lemon rind
    1 tsp. farina
    1 tbsp. soft butter

    Press the cheese through a ricer or a fine strainer and mix thoroughly
    with the other ingredients.

    Beat eggs, add salt and sugar, water and flour and beat to a smooth batter.

    Drop this batter (two tablespoons at a time) onto a small frying pan
    that has been slightly greased and heated. Tip the pan so that the
    batter spreads thinly over the entire pan. Work quickly.

    Bake on one side only until the top is dry and starts to blister. Turn
    out, bottom side up, on a board or clean cloth.

    When all the pancakes have been made, fill each with one tablespoon of
    the cheese mixture. Fold over the opposite sides to form little rectangles.

    Place in a well-greased baking pan, brush with melted butter and bake in
    a hot oven (400 degrees) until golden brown and crisp. If preferred,
    they may be fried instead of baked.

    Serve hot with sour cream or with powdered sugar and cinnamon.


    It's a long way to Shavuot when blintzes are traditional.






    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  9. #9
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel


    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 10/5/2010 8:23 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >> She could make a perfect matzoh ball from
    >> scratch too, soft outside, dense center. Yum.

    >
    > Is there any other way to make them than from scratch?


    Go to a restaurant?

    ;-)

    MartyB

    --
    -



  10. #10
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel


    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 10/5/2010 7:01 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >> My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally
    >> delicious.

    >
    > savory potato blintzes I've heard of but cheese blintzes are generally
    > sweet.
    >
    >> She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup over it.

    >
    > noodle kugel pie? With chicken soup on top? Maybe she fried her
    > luckshin into a lump?
    >
    >> Anybody got anything on these?

    >
    > Not I. where in Europe did her family come from?


    I don't recall but she grew up in the Adirondacks IIRC. Her husband is of
    Russian descent. I doubt that influenced her cooking though.

    MartyB


    --
    -



  11. #11
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel


    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 10/5/2010 8:23 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >> She could make a perfect matzoh ball from
    >> scratch too, soft outside, dense center. Yum.

    >
    > Is there any other way to make them than from scratch?


    All this talk got me really hungry for Jewish Mother Chicken Soup. Besides
    I've been ill and we all know this stuff has magic medicinal powers. I had a
    dozen skinless drumsticks left over from the barbecue contest. So I did my
    best to knock it off last night and I must say it's quite creditable, if not
    perfect, hint of dill and garlic, some well cooked carrots floating around
    and most of the onion and celery broken down.

    I pulled the meat from the bones when done and returned bones to stock. I
    compensated for the lack of skin by starting with a lot of water and
    reducing down the stock by a good 2/3 or more to extract as much flavor as
    possible from the bones over a long period. A little more schmaltz from skin
    would have been nice but it has the right flavor and the biggest diff is
    that it chilled down with only about a millimeter of congealed fat on top,
    probably not even worth skimming. (IMO, this stuff is always better served
    the second day.)

    Now I have never made matzoh balls so I may just resort to a box of
    Manischevitz mix rather than attempt that learning curve in one day. I could
    do dumplings but that requires a different flavor of slightly thickened
    chicken soup IMO.

    If I could just figure out the noodle kugel pie I wouldn't worry about the
    matzoh balls.

    MartyB



  12. #12
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

    On Wed 06 Oct 2010 06:38:51a, Nunya Bidnits told us...

    >
    > Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On 10/5/2010 8:23 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >>> She could make a perfect matzoh ball from scratch too, soft
    >>> outside, dense center. Yum.

    >>
    >> Is there any other way to make them than from scratch?

    >
    > All this talk got me really hungry for Jewish Mother Chicken Soup.
    > Besides I've been ill and we all know this stuff has magic
    > medicinal powers. I had a dozen skinless drumsticks left over from
    > the barbecue contest. So I did my best to knock it off last night
    > and I must say it's quite creditable, if not perfect, hint of dill
    > and garlic, some well cooked carrots floating around and most of
    > the onion and celery broken down.
    >
    > I pulled the meat from the bones when done and returned bones to
    > stock. I compensated for the lack of skin by starting with a lot
    > of water and reducing down the stock by a good 2/3 or more to
    > extract as much flavor as possible from the bones over a long
    > period. A little more schmaltz from skin would have been nice but
    > it has the right flavor and the biggest diff is that it chilled
    > down with only about a millimeter of congealed fat on top,
    > probably not even worth skimming. (IMO, this stuff is always
    > better served the second day.)
    >
    > Now I have never made matzoh balls so I may just resort to a box
    > of Manischevitz mix rather than attempt that learning curve in one
    > day. I could do dumplings but that requires a different flavor of
    > slightly thickened chicken soup IMO.
    >
    > If I could just figure out the noodle kugel pie I wouldn't worry
    > about the matzoh balls.
    >
    > MartyB


    All sounds good. My one piece of advice when forming the matzo balls
    is to make sue your hands are wet.



    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  13. #13
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel


    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Wed 06 Oct 2010 06:38:51a, Nunya Bidnits told us...
    >
    >>
    >> Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> On 10/5/2010 8:23 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >>>> She could make a perfect matzoh ball from scratch too, soft
    >>>> outside, dense center. Yum.
    >>>
    >>> Is there any other way to make them than from scratch?

    >>
    >> All this talk got me really hungry for Jewish Mother Chicken Soup.
    >> Besides I've been ill and we all know this stuff has magic
    >> medicinal powers. I had a dozen skinless drumsticks left over from
    >> the barbecue contest. So I did my best to knock it off last night
    >> and I must say it's quite creditable, if not perfect, hint of dill
    >> and garlic, some well cooked carrots floating around and most of
    >> the onion and celery broken down.
    >>
    >> I pulled the meat from the bones when done and returned bones to
    >> stock. I compensated for the lack of skin by starting with a lot
    >> of water and reducing down the stock by a good 2/3 or more to
    >> extract as much flavor as possible from the bones over a long
    >> period. A little more schmaltz from skin would have been nice but
    >> it has the right flavor and the biggest diff is that it chilled
    >> down with only about a millimeter of congealed fat on top,
    >> probably not even worth skimming. (IMO, this stuff is always
    >> better served the second day.)
    >>
    >> Now I have never made matzoh balls so I may just resort to a box
    >> of Manischevitz mix rather than attempt that learning curve in one
    >> day. I could do dumplings but that requires a different flavor of
    >> slightly thickened chicken soup IMO.
    >>
    >> If I could just figure out the noodle kugel pie I wouldn't worry
    >> about the matzoh balls.
    >>
    >> MartyB

    >
    > All sounds good. My one piece of advice when forming the matzo balls
    > is to make sue your hands are wet.


    So noted, thanks!

    MartyB



  14. #14
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

    Nunya Bidnits <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally delicious.


    The cheese used is in blintzes is farmer's cheese, which is basically
    the same as the traditional "tvorog" (Russian) or "bialy ser" (Polish).
    Usually, at least some sugar is added (not to mention other sweet
    components), but it can be omitted if desired. Here is a recipe:

    Filling:
    600 g (20 oz) farmer's cheese
    1-2 tablespoons good sour cream or crème fraîche
    1-2 eggs
    1 tablespoon sugar
    a pinch of salt
    optionally, cinnamon to taste

    Mix everything very well until it combines into a uniform elastic mass.

    Blintzes:
    3 eggs
    1 cup milk
    1 1/2 cups plain flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    3/4 cups water
    4 tablespoons butter for frying

    Lightly beat the eggs and milk together. Sift the flour and salt
    together, add to eggs and milk and mix till smooth. Add water and mix
    again. In a hot pan put 1/2 teaspoon butter. Pour in about 4
    tablespoons of batter and cook on one side, then on the other till light
    brown. Drain on grease-proof paper. Continue process till all blintzes
    are made.

    Put 1 tablespoon of the filling on each blintz, not quite in the centre.
    Fold over a flap to cover filling, then fold in each side and finally
    roll up remaining side, making a kind of envelope. Five minutes before
    serving heat 1 tablespoon of butter in the frying-pan, put in the
    blintzes and brown all over.

    Note: I personally prefer to cook the blintzes and other kinds of crèpes
    on one side only, put the filling on that side, fold in the crèpes and
    then brown them in the pan. That way the wrapper won't be overcooked.

    > She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup over it.


    A simple version of lokshen kugel is easy enough to make. Here is what
    I make very occasionally.

    Cook the noodles in salted water until not quite ready. Put in a
    colander and rinse with cold water. Drain, put the noodles in a plate
    and mix with an egg. In a hot pan cook the noodles in some fat until a
    firm golden crust forms. Turn over the kugel (perhaps inverting it onto
    a flat lid, to make it easier), adding more fat if necessary, and cook
    the other side. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, for 10-15
    minutes. If desired, cut in pieces and serve with broth or soup, or
    with some other dish.

    Victor

  15. #15
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel



    Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >
    > My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally delicious.


    Why would cheese blintzes ever be sweet? Never had any that were; are
    they supposed to be?


    > She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup over it.
    >
    > Anybody got anything on these?
    >
    > MartyB


    Hmmm...chicken soup over a kugel/pudding? Could be interesting.

    Most of our traditional Ashkenazi recipes are best prepared in colder
    weather, so haven't started that route yet. Not very familiar with
    Sephardic cooking though.

  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel

    On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 17:34:34 -0600, Arri London <[email protected]>
    wrote:



    I've seen jam and honey accompany cheese on a cheese plate, so why
    not?

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  17. #17
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel


    Victor Sack <[email protected]> wrote:
    <good recipes clipped>

    Thanks!!! I appreciate all the detail.

    MartyB



  18. #18
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel


    Arri London <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >>
    >> My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally
    >> delicious.

    >
    > Why would cheese blintzes ever be sweet? Never had any that were; are
    > they supposed to be?
    >


    That was my experience. I had never had blintzes any other way. Later down
    the road after we divorced, I had blintzes elsewhere and thought something
    was wrong with them. Only then did I find out that sweetness was the norm.
    But I still love the savory ones the best.

    >
    >> She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup over it.
    >>
    >> Anybody got anything on these?
    >>
    >> MartyB

    >
    > Hmmm...chicken soup over a kugel/pudding? Could be interesting.
    >
    > Most of our traditional Ashkenazi recipes are best prepared in colder
    > weather, so haven't started that route yet. Not very familiar with
    > Sephardic cooking though.


    It wasn't pudding texture, more like a crispy noodle pie. Not strong
    flavored at all, mostly a vehicle for soaking up that wonderful soup.

    MartyB



  19. #19
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel



    sf wrote:
    >
    > On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 17:34:34 -0600, Arri London <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > I've seen jam and honey accompany cheese on a cheese plate, so why
    > not?
    >



    Where did you see that? Sounds dreadful

  20. #20
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Cheese blintzes and noodle kugel



    Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >
    > Arri London <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > >>
    > >> My Ex MIL made savory cheese blintzes. Not sweet, and totally
    > >> delicious.

    > >
    > > Why would cheese blintzes ever be sweet? Never had any that were; are
    > > they supposed to be?
    > >

    >
    > That was my experience. I had never had blintzes any other way. Later down
    > the road after we divorced, I had blintzes elsewhere and thought something
    > was wrong with them. Only then did I find out that sweetness was the norm.
    > But I still love the savory ones the best.


    Same here. Only fruit blintzes are sweet, in my own limited experience.

    >
    > >
    > >> She also made a noodle kugel pie and poured her chicken soup over it.
    > >>
    > >> Anybody got anything on these?
    > >>
    > >> MartyB

    > >
    > > Hmmm...chicken soup over a kugel/pudding? Could be interesting.
    > >
    > > Most of our traditional Ashkenazi recipes are best prepared in colder
    > > weather, so haven't started that route yet. Not very familiar with
    > > Sephardic cooking though.

    >
    > It wasn't pudding texture, more like a crispy noodle pie. Not strong
    > flavored at all, mostly a vehicle for soaking up that wonderful soup.
    >
    > MartyB


    Sorry bout that...kugels are often labelled puddings as in 'lockshen
    pudding'. Noodles and soup always work for me

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