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Thread: Ceramic Knives

  1. #1
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Ceramic Knives

    My mom gave me one for Christmas last year, and it
    was okay but I was thinking about dumping it because
    I prefer my regular kitchen knife. The ceramic one
    had a straight blade and I'm used to the curve of
    a conventional kitchen knife. The ceramic knife
    did seem to be plenty sharp.

    About a week ago I lost it. I think it fell in the
    trash. Because I was already thinking about throwing
    it away, it didn't seem to be a significant loss.

    But then there was a sale on pineapples at the nearby
    Asian food store. The first time in a year that I
    tried peeling a pineapple with a steel knife the
    difference was very noticable. Even freshly sharpened,
    the steel knife didn't do nearly as well going through
    pineapple skin. I had been using the spiral method
    of removing the eyes with the ceramic knife, but that
    was just too difficult with the steel knife.

    So I bought a new ceramic knife. This one does have
    a curved blade. On my first pineapple with this knife,
    I could tell it was even sharper than the old one.
    I've only had it a little while, but it already seems
    to be a great knife. It's made in China, and it's
    called THE CERABLADE, or at least that's what's printed
    on the blade. I bought it at the Asian food store for
    $21. They had two smaller sizes that were cheaper,
    but I thought I should get what I wanted rather than
    save a couple bucks and live in misery for the rest
    of my life. There wasn't any sale or discount, so
    I imagine that price can be beaten on the net.

    I do take care not to drop it or use it on any hard
    surface. The edge only sees fruit and a wooden cutting
    board. Only cut myself once so far. On the first day
    I had it, it was sitting edge-up in my dish rack when
    I accidently dropped a pistachio in the vicinity. When
    I reached down to hunt for it, my arm lightly brushed
    against it and got cut. I barely felt it, but it sure
    bled for a while. I'm a little more careful now.

  2. #2
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    On 12/9/2011 9:32 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > My mom gave me one for Christmas last year, and it
    > was okay but I was thinking about dumping it because
    > I prefer my regular kitchen knife. The ceramic one
    > had a straight blade and I'm used to the curve of
    > a conventional kitchen knife. The ceramic knife
    > did seem to be plenty sharp.
    >
    > About a week ago I lost it. I think it fell in the
    > trash. Because I was already thinking about throwing
    > it away, it didn't seem to be a significant loss.
    >
    > But then there was a sale on pineapples at the nearby
    > Asian food store. The first time in a year that I
    > tried peeling a pineapple with a steel knife the
    > difference was very noticable. Even freshly sharpened,
    > the steel knife didn't do nearly as well going through
    > pineapple skin. I had been using the spiral method
    > of removing the eyes with the ceramic knife, but that
    > was just too difficult with the steel knife.
    >
    > So I bought a new ceramic knife. This one does have
    > a curved blade. On my first pineapple with this knife,
    > I could tell it was even sharper than the old one.
    > I've only had it a little while, but it already seems
    > to be a great knife. It's made in China, and it's
    > called THE CERABLADE, or at least that's what's printed
    > on the blade. I bought it at the Asian food store for
    > $21. They had two smaller sizes that were cheaper,
    > but I thought I should get what I wanted rather than
    > save a couple bucks and live in misery for the rest
    > of my life. There wasn't any sale or discount, so
    > I imagine that price can be beaten on the net.
    >
    > I do take care not to drop it or use it on any hard
    > surface. The edge only sees fruit and a wooden cutting
    > board. Only cut myself once so far. On the first day
    > I had it, it was sitting edge-up in my dish rack when
    > I accidently dropped a pistachio in the vicinity. When
    > I reached down to hunt for it, my arm lightly brushed
    > against it and got cut. I barely felt it, but it sure
    > bled for a while. I'm a little more careful now.


    Personally, I beware of any product "made in China"!!! There's no
    telling what manufacturing process or 'ingredients' used that included
    in their products! Just think of all those toy products that were
    recalled (who can count?!) because they were contaminated with high
    levels of lead and other toxic materials, etc.!

    Regardless, I'm not surprised the ceramic knife performed so well.
    Anywho, my point is I recently saw a rerun(?) the other day of "How It's
    Made" (or something like that) on one of the sat/cable channels
    regarding the "Kyocera" ceramic knives. I was impressed with the
    process used to manufacture Kyocera knives! One issue I learned was
    'ceramic' cannot be picked up by metal detectors at airports and other
    points of security! So, Kyocera purposely implants enough minute metal
    elements into their ceramic knives so they 'can' be detected by metal
    detectors (smart!).

    From watching the show, I learned that ceramic knives are vastly
    different than fine stainless steel knives in that they will not
    absorb/adsorb (whichever!) odors or oils and subsequently impart
    unwanted flavors to other foods later sliced. Because of this
    'feature,' sushi 'chefs' (proper term?) prefer to use ceramic knives!

    Sky, who's feeling a bit 'jonesy' :>

    --

    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  3. #3
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives


    "Mark Thorson" <> wrote > My mom gave me one for Christmas last year, and it
    > was okay but I was thinking about dumping it because
    > I prefer my regular kitchen knife. The ceramic one
    > had a straight blade and I'm used to the curve of
    > a conventional kitchen knife. The ceramic knife
    > did seem to be plenty sharp.
    >
    > About a week ago I lost it. I think it fell in the
    > trash. Because I was already thinking about throwing
    > it away, it didn't seem to be a significant loss.
    >
    > But then there was a sale on pineapples at the nearby
    > Asian food store. The first time in a year that I
    > tried peeling a pineapple with a steel knife the
    > difference was very noticable. Even freshly sharpened,
    > the steel knife didn't do nearly as well going through
    > pineapple skin. I had been using the spiral method
    > of removing the eyes with the ceramic knife, but that
    > was just too difficult with the steel knife.
    >
    > So I bought a new ceramic knife. This one does have
    > a curved blade. On my first pineapple with this knife,
    > I could tell it was even sharper than the old one.
    > I've only had it a little while, but it already seems
    > to be a great knife. It's made in China, and it's
    > called THE CERABLADE, or at least that's what's printed
    > on the blade. I bought it at the Asian food store for
    > $21. They had two smaller sizes that were cheaper,
    > but I thought I should get what I wanted rather than
    > save a couple bucks and live in misery for the rest
    > of my life. There wasn't any sale or discount, so
    > I imagine that price can be beaten on the net.
    >
    > I do take care not to drop it or use it on any hard
    > surface. The edge only sees fruit and a wooden cutting
    > board. Only cut myself once so far. On the first day
    > I had it, it was sitting edge-up in my dish rack when
    > I accidently dropped a pistachio in the vicinity. When
    > I reached down to hunt for it, my arm lightly brushed
    > against it and got cut. I barely felt it, but it sure
    > bled for a while. I'm a little more careful now.


    Waaaah! Never, Ever put down anything sharp 'edge up'. Even our salad
    forks are placed tines down in the dishwasher. I can't imagine what sort of
    live critters Oneida was expecting us to toss in our salads when they
    designed Act I. Those forks are killer sharp and will do a world of hurt.
    Here on the bayou, 911 is too far away to be much help. Even if we lived
    beside the hospital, the visit would be painful and expensive. Mark, does
    your Mom know you're not careful enough? I'm telling. Polly


  4. #4
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    On Dec 9, 10:32*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > My mom gave me one for Christmas last year, and it
    > was okay but I was thinking about dumping it because
    > I prefer my regular kitchen knife. *The ceramic one
    > had a straight blade and I'm used to the curve of
    > a conventional kitchen knife. *The ceramic knife
    > did seem to be plenty sharp.
    >
    > About a week ago I lost it. *I think it fell in the
    > trash. *Because I was already thinking about throwing
    > it away, it didn't seem to be a significant loss.
    >
    > But then there was a sale on pineapples at the nearby
    > Asian food store. *The first time in a year that I
    > tried peeling a pineapple with a steel knife the
    > difference was very noticable. *Even freshly sharpened,
    > the steel knife didn't do nearly as well going through
    > pineapple skin. *I had been using the spiral method
    > of removing the eyes with the ceramic knife, but that
    > was just too difficult with the steel knife.
    >
    > So I bought a new ceramic knife. *This one does have
    > a curved blade. *On my first pineapple with this knife,
    > I could tell it was even sharper than the old one.
    > I've only had it a little while, but it already seems
    > to be a great knife. *It's made in China, and it's
    > called THE CERABLADE, or at least that's what's printed
    > on the blade. *I bought it at the Asian food store for
    > $21. *They had two smaller sizes that were cheaper,
    > but I thought I should get what I wanted rather than
    > save a couple bucks and live in misery for the rest
    > of my life. *There wasn't any sale or discount, so
    > I imagine that price can be beaten on the net.
    >
    > I do take care not to drop it or use it on any hard
    > surface. *The edge only sees fruit and a wooden cutting
    > board. *Only cut myself once so far. *On the first day
    > I had it, it was sitting edge-up in my dish rack when
    > I accidently dropped a pistachio in the vicinity. *When
    > I reached down to hunt for it, my arm lightly brushed
    > against it and got cut. *I barely felt it, but it sure
    > bled for a while. *I'm a little more careful now.


    The new one seems sharper because it is. A year from now, it will be
    like the one you just lost. Ceramic knives can be sharpened with a
    diamond stone or other stones also useful for carbide. Enjoy it!

    Jerry
    --
    "I view the progress of science as being the slow erosion of the
    tendency to dichotomize." Barbara Smuts, U. Mich.
    ŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻ ŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻ

  5. #5
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    On Dec 9, 11:12*pm, Sky <skyho...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM> wrote:
    ...

    > Regardless, I'm not surprised the ceramic knife performed so well.
    > Anywho, my point is I recently saw a rerun(?) the other day of "How It's
    > Made" (or something like that) on one of the sat/cable channels
    > regarding the "Kyocera" ceramic knives. *I was impressed with the
    > process used to manufacture Kyocera knives! *One issue I learned was
    > 'ceramic' cannot be picked up by metal detectors at airports and other
    > points of security! So, Kyocera purposely implants enough minute metal
    > elements into their ceramic knives so they 'can' be detected by metal
    > detectors (smart!).


    ...

    Steel, whether stainless or not, doesn't absorb odors. Some ceramics
    do, but not the high-fired ceramic that knives are made of. Think
    about it: can you imagine a piece of solid steep soaking up something
    that it was dipped into?

    Jerry
    --
    "I view the progress of science as being the slow erosion of the
    tendency to dichotomize." Barbara Smuts, U. Mich.
    ŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻ ŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻ

  6. #6
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    On 12/9/2011 10:25 PM, Jerry Avins wrote:
    >
    > Steel, whether stainless or not, doesn't absorb odors. Some ceramics
    > do, but not the high-fired ceramic that knives are made of. Think
    > about it: can you imagine a piece of solid steep soaking up something
    > that it was dipped into?


    The TV show specifically said that (stainless) steel knives will retain
    the flavors of various fish oils (when slicing to make sushi) and
    reiterated the ceramic knives do not. I can see how "oils" will make
    residues on steel and wouldn't on ceramics, especially when properly
    washed. I only reiterate what I 'learned' (?!) via watching a TV show
    on a reputable 'learning' channel --- yeah yeah -- I gotta take that
    with a grain of salt, too!

    Sky, who's no expert nor posed as one!

    --

    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  7. #7
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives


    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > My mom gave me one for Christmas last year, and it
    > was okay but I was thinking about dumping it because
    > I prefer my regular kitchen knife. The ceramic one
    > had a straight blade and I'm used to the curve of
    > a conventional kitchen knife. The ceramic knife
    > did seem to be plenty sharp.
    >
    > About a week ago I lost it. I think it fell in the
    > trash. Because I was already thinking about throwing
    > it away, it didn't seem to be a significant loss.
    >
    > But then there was a sale on pineapples at the nearby
    > Asian food store. The first time in a year that I
    > tried peeling a pineapple with a steel knife the
    > difference was very noticable. Even freshly sharpened,
    > the steel knife didn't do nearly as well going through
    > pineapple skin. I had been using the spiral method
    > of removing the eyes with the ceramic knife, but that
    > was just too difficult with the steel knife.
    >
    > So I bought a new ceramic knife. This one does have
    > a curved blade. On my first pineapple with this knife,
    > I could tell it was even sharper than the old one.
    > I've only had it a little while, but it already seems
    > to be a great knife. It's made in China, and it's
    > called THE CERABLADE, or at least that's what's printed
    > on the blade. I bought it at the Asian food store for
    > $21. They had two smaller sizes that were cheaper,
    > but I thought I should get what I wanted rather than
    > save a couple bucks and live in misery for the rest
    > of my life. There wasn't any sale or discount, so
    > I imagine that price can be beaten on the net.
    >
    > I do take care not to drop it or use it on any hard
    > surface. The edge only sees fruit and a wooden cutting
    > board. Only cut myself once so far. On the first day
    > I had it, it was sitting edge-up in my dish rack when
    > I accidently dropped a pistachio in the vicinity. When
    > I reached down to hunt for it, my arm lightly brushed
    > against it and got cut. I barely felt it, but it sure
    > bled for a while. I'm a little more careful now.


    I have three inexpensive ceramic ones. First one bought online. The other
    two were bought at TJ Maxx. They're small. They're good. And I like that
    the ones I have came with sheaths so I can use them for travel.



  8. #8
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives


    Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > My mom gave me one for Christmas last year, and it
    > was okay but I was thinking about dumping it because
    > I prefer my regular kitchen knife. The ceramic one
    > had a straight blade and I'm used to the curve of
    > a conventional kitchen knife. The ceramic knife
    > did seem to be plenty sharp.
    >
    > About a week ago I lost it. I think it fell in the
    > trash. Because I was already thinking about throwing
    > it away, it didn't seem to be a significant loss.
    >
    > But then there was a sale on pineapples at the nearby
    > Asian food store. The first time in a year that I
    > tried peeling a pineapple with a steel knife the
    > difference was very noticable. Even freshly sharpened,
    > the steel knife didn't do nearly as well going through
    > pineapple skin. I had been using the spiral method
    > of removing the eyes with the ceramic knife, but that
    > was just too difficult with the steel knife.
    >
    > So I bought a new ceramic knife. This one does have
    > a curved blade. On my first pineapple with this knife,
    > I could tell it was even sharper than the old one.
    > I've only had it a little while, but it already seems
    > to be a great knife. It's made in China, and it's
    > called THE CERABLADE, or at least that's what's printed
    > on the blade. I bought it at the Asian food store for
    > $21. They had two smaller sizes that were cheaper,
    > but I thought I should get what I wanted rather than
    > save a couple bucks and live in misery for the rest
    > of my life. There wasn't any sale or discount, so
    > I imagine that price can be beaten on the net.
    >
    > I do take care not to drop it or use it on any hard
    > surface. The edge only sees fruit and a wooden cutting
    > board. Only cut myself once so far. On the first day
    > I had it, it was sitting edge-up in my dish rack when
    > I accidently dropped a pistachio in the vicinity. When
    > I reached down to hunt for it, my arm lightly brushed
    > against it and got cut. I barely felt it, but it sure
    > bled for a while. I'm a little more careful now.


    A while back I noted that Harbor Freight carries several ceramic kitchen
    knives ranging from about $6-$11 when on sale that work well and are an
    excellent way to try out ceramic knives without much investment. Don't
    drop or pry with them and they do just fine. They also don't react with
    acidic foods like good carbon steel knives will.

  9. #9
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    Sky wrote:
    >
    > Regardless, I'm not surprised the ceramic knife performed so well.
    > Anywho, my point is I recently saw a rerun(?) the other day of "How It's
    > Made" (or something like that) on one of the sat/cable channels
    > regarding the "Kyocera" ceramic knives. I was impressed with the
    > process used to manufacture Kyocera knives! One issue I learned was
    > 'ceramic' cannot be picked up by metal detectors at airports and other
    > points of security! So, Kyocera purposely implants enough minute metal
    > elements into their ceramic knives so they 'can' be detected by metal
    > detectors (smart!).


    Ceramic knives have become cheap enough to treat them like junk blades.
    When they break trash them and pull one of the spares out of the drawer.
    Amazing how the market for them went from a high tech speciality product
    to economy of scale mass manufacturing in a coupleof decades.

    Maybe they should be called "jewel knives" because their material is a
    synethic gem. The name would parallel "jewel watches".

  10. #10
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    On Fri, 9 Dec 2011 22:13:23 -0600, "Polly Esther"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    snip
    >
    >Waaaah! Never, Ever put down anything sharp 'edge up'. Even our salad
    >forks are placed tines down in the dishwasher. snip

    .. Polly
    Everyone here is taught to put any sharp utensil in the last, at the
    back, utensil basket. That way, anyone unloading the dishwasher know
    where to expect sharps. I am not a fan of putting pokey/sharp things
    sharp side down in the basket. They often ruin the basket bottom or
    stick through far enough to snag the passing washer arm.
    Janet US

  11. #11
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I do take care not to drop it or use it on any hard
    > surface. The edge only sees fruit and a wooden cutting
    > board. Only cut myself once so far. On the first day
    > I had it, it was sitting edge-up in my dish rack when
    > I accidently dropped a pistachio in the vicinity. When
    > I reached down to hunt for it, my arm lightly brushed
    > against it and got cut. I barely felt it, but it sure
    > bled for a while. I'm a little more careful now.


    I like ceramics for limited uses. As you said they are very sharp but they
    certainly are not durable or versatile.

    I like them for vegetables except that you have to be careful not to snag
    them in the cutting surface if you are trying to work quickly. They feel to
    me like they catch in the cutting mat or board and I fear chipping them so I
    have to slow down and make sure each cut is released from the mat before
    going to the next.

    While they are supposedly ok as long as there are no bones, I don't like
    using them on meat, boneless or not, except for fish. Steel knives are far
    superior.

    They also require extra care in handling, cleaning, and storage to avoid
    damaging them.

    However when you want really nice precise and uniform cuts of vegetables
    they work quite well. But for making the major cuts, such as halving an
    onion, I still prefer steel. At that point I may as well proceed with the
    steel knife.

    Given all the hassle for limited usefulness, I wouldn't buy another one.

    MartyB




  12. #12
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >
    > Everyone here is taught to put any sharp utensil in the last, at the
    > back, utensil basket. That way, anyone unloading the dishwasher know
    > where to expect sharps. I am not a fan of putting pokey/sharp things
    > sharp side down in the basket. They often ruin the basket bottom or
    > stick through far enough to snag the passing washer arm.


    No, I'm going to continue to put my ceramic knife
    in the dishrack sharp edge up, and bitch about it here
    every time I cut myself. I'm like John Kuthe that way.

  13. #13
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    On 12/10/2011 5:41 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >>
    >> Everyone here is taught to put any sharp utensil in the last, at the
    >> back, utensil basket. That way, anyone unloading the dishwasher know
    >> where to expect sharps. I am not a fan of putting pokey/sharp things
    >> sharp side down in the basket. They often ruin the basket bottom or
    >> stick through far enough to snag the passing washer arm.

    >
    > No, I'm going to continue to put my ceramic knife
    > in the dishrack sharp edge up, and bitch about it here
    > every time I cut myself. I'm like John Kuthe that way.


    I've been using two ceramic knives for about 9 months now. They cost
    about $20 for the set and are still very sharp; so much so that they've
    replaced most of my collection of steel knives. They do need to be wiped
    with a soapy sponge if they are not to transfer odors. Onion-flavored
    pineapple is not good! I don't wash them in the dishwasher but I never
    did that for kitchen knives anyway.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  14. #14
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    On Sat, 10 Dec 2011 14:41:48 -0800, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >>
    >> Everyone here is taught to put any sharp utensil in the last, at the
    >> back, utensil basket. That way, anyone unloading the dishwasher know
    >> where to expect sharps. I am not a fan of putting pokey/sharp things
    >> sharp side down in the basket. They often ruin the basket bottom or
    >> stick through far enough to snag the passing washer arm.

    >
    >No, I'm going to continue to put my ceramic knife
    >in the dishrack sharp edge up, and bitch about it here
    >every time I cut myself. I'm like John Kuthe that way.


    I never suggested that anyone put their preparation knives in the
    dishwasher (upside or downside). I was only talking about the other
    sharp and pokey things that we use that do go into the dishwasher. Now
    don't make me worry about you. Be good and don't put your sharp
    knives in the dishwasher )
    Janet US

  15. #15
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    On Dec 10, 1:44*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    september.invalid> wrote:
    > Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >
    > > I do take care not to drop it or use it on any hard
    > > surface. *The edge only sees fruit and a wooden cutting
    > > board. *Only cut myself once so far. *On the first day
    > > I had it, it was sitting edge-up in my dish rack when
    > > I accidently dropped a pistachio in the vicinity. *When
    > > I reached down to hunt for it, my arm lightly brushed
    > > against it and got cut. *I barely felt it, but it sure
    > > bled for a while. *I'm a little more careful now.

    >
    > I like ceramics for limited uses. As you said they are very sharp but they
    > certainly are not durable or versatile.
    >
    > I like them for vegetables except that you have to be careful not to snag
    > them in the cutting surface if you are trying to work quickly. They feel to
    > me like they catch in the cutting mat or board and I fear chipping them so I
    > have to slow down and make sure each cut is released from the mat before
    > going to the next.
    >
    > While they are supposedly ok as long as there are no bones, I don't like
    > using them on meat, boneless or not, except for fish. Steel knives are far
    > superior.
    >
    > They also require extra care in handling, cleaning, and storage to avoid
    > damaging them.
    >
    > However when you want really nice precise and uniform cuts of vegetables
    > they work quite well. But for making the major cuts, such as halving an
    > onion, I still prefer steel. At that point I may as well proceed with the
    > steel knife.
    >
    > Given all the hassle for limited usefulness, I wouldn't buy another one.
    >
    > MartyB


    Thanks for convincing me not to fall prey.

  16. #16
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    On 10/12/2011 1:44 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > Mark Thorson<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> I do take care not to drop it or use it on any hard
    >> surface. The edge only sees fruit and a wooden cutting
    >> board. Only cut myself once so far. On the first day
    >> I had it, it was sitting edge-up in my dish rack when
    >> I accidently dropped a pistachio in the vicinity. When
    >> I reached down to hunt for it, my arm lightly brushed
    >> against it and got cut. I barely felt it, but it sure
    >> bled for a while. I'm a little more careful now.

    >
    > I like ceramics for limited uses. As you said they are very sharp but they
    > certainly are not durable or versatile.



    That about sums it up. They are good for some things. It is nice to have
    a knife that ids razor sharp, but it there are those issues of
    durability and versatility. While they are terrific for tasks where you
    need an extremely sharp knife to cut something that is relatively soft,
    you can't use them for a lot of things that you might normally use a
    knife for. You can't use them for hard things, anything frozen. No
    poking and no prying. No cutting into or around bones.


    I have three of them, including one that I had bought for my mother on
    Christmas and reclaimed after she died. They are handy for some things
    but If I had to choose between steel or ceramic, there is no doubt that
    I would opt for steel.


  17. #17
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >
    > I never suggested that anyone put their preparation knives in the
    > dishwasher (upside or downside). I was only talking about the other
    > sharp and pokey things that we use that do go into the dishwasher. Now
    > don't make me worry about you. Be good and don't put your sharp
    > knives in the dishwasher )


    I don't have a dishwasher. The dish rack is for drying.

  18. #18
    BubbaBob Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:

    I have a top of the line Kyocera santaku that is one of the finest knives
    I've ever used. I've had it for a year and I use it daily. It's still sharp
    enough to shave with. It's also taken two falls to the floor that didn't
    damage it. I also have one of the smaller cheaper ceramic knives that
    doesn't even begin to compare to it. You get what you pay for.

  19. #19
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives

    BubbaBob <rnorton47@_remove_this_comcast.net> wrote:

    > Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I have a top of the line Kyocera santaku that is one of the finest
    > knives I've ever used. I've had it for a year and I use it daily. It's
    > still sharp enough to shave with. It's also taken two falls to the
    > floor that didn't damage it. I also have one of the smaller cheaper
    > ceramic knives that doesn't even begin to compare to it. You get what
    > you pay for.



    I have a kyocera white ceramic 5.5" utility knife.

    It's an excellent knife! It's almost gravity free, smoothly drifting
    through anything like butter!

    For anyone interested, it's NOT good for carving bones!

    Bend the blade on bones and it will break!

    Otherwise it will stay sharp and last for years.

    I bought the ceramic knife thanks to Ming Sai's expertise/demonstrations.

    Andy
    --
    I AM brave!!! I just saved a fish from drowning!
    --From "Scrubbs"

  20. #20
    Rik Brown Guest

    Default Re: Ceramic Knives


    Question: When it does get dull (and in some time frame it must), how
    does one sharpen it? -- Rik


    --
    Rik Brown

    Share your experiences in the forums, blogs, videos, and online
    community at 'TRAVEL.COM' (http://www.TRAVEL.com).
    Message Origin: http://www.travel.com


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