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Thread: Cardoons?

  1. #1
    Tracy Guest

    Default Cardoons?

    Ever use them? I had never heard of them until the other day when my
    husband brought some home.

    It looks like celery, but tastes totally different. The interwebs say
    they taste like artichokes. Not quite in my opinion.

    -Tracy


  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 19:15:45 -0800 (PST), Tracy <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Ever use them? I had never heard of them until the other day when my
    > husband brought some home.
    >
    > It looks like celery, but tastes totally different. The interwebs say
    > they taste like artichokes. Not quite in my opinion.
    >

    The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.
    http://plantdatabase.co.nz/Cardoon
    http://www.friendsschoolplantsale.co...3/cardoon1.jpg
    I have no idea what they taste like. I don't know which part of the
    plant to eat or how to cook it.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  3. #3
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:22:14 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:


    >The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.


    No, they don't. You were with me, when we saw some at the Alemany
    market. They look like celery. I took a picture of them when you
    were with me.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    Tracy wrote:

    > Ever use them? I had never heard of them until the other day when my
    > husband brought some home.
    >
    > It looks like celery, but tastes totally different. The interwebs say
    > they taste like artichokes. Not quite in my opinion.


    This sounds most like how my ex's grandmother made them, except
    they said she pounded the stalks.

    I loved that fried cardoon.

    nancy

  5. #5
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    On Nov 23, 9:22*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:

    >
    > The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.http://plantdatabase.co.nz/Cardoonht...s/2009/03/card...
    > I have no idea what they taste like. *I don't know which part of the
    > plant to eat or how to cook it.


    Not so fast...LOL

    This is the pic I took of cardoons, when you came with me to the
    Alemany market several years ago. I told you then, that I was taking a
    pic to send to Nancy, cause she loves cardoons.
    They look like celery to me..
    http://i56.tinypic.com/jjlgyv.jpg

    Christine

  6. #6
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?


    "Tracy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    > Ever use them? I had never heard of them until the other day when my>
    > husband brought some home.
    >
    > It looks like celery, but tastes totally different. The interwebs say>
    > they taste like artichokes. Not quite in my opinion.


    They are a cousin to the srtichoke. You eat only the stems, and should boil
    them first to get rid of bitterness, then proceed with one of the many
    recipes. A typical one is baked with oil, garlic and crumbs, but there are
    loads of recipes.

    Part of their appeal is probably that they are fresh and edible in
    mid-winter when not much else is. They have a lot of fibre, too.



  7. #7
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?



    On 11/24/2010 12:22 AM, sf wrote:
    > On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 19:15:45 -0800 (PST), Tracy<[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Ever use them? I had never heard of them until the other day when my
    >> husband brought some home.
    >>
    >> It looks like celery, but tastes totally different. The interwebs say
    >> they taste like artichokes. Not quite in my opinion.
    >>

    > The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.
    > http://plantdatabase.co.nz/Cardoon
    > http://www.friendsschoolplantsale.co...3/cardoon1.jpg
    > I have no idea what they taste like. I don't know which part of the
    > plant to eat or how to cook it.
    >



    Interesting. This is what I had:

    http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/Diction...oons-5628.aspx

    -Tracy

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:27:32 -0800, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:22:14 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.

    >
    > No, they don't. You were with me, when we saw some at the Alemany
    > market. They look like celery. I took a picture of them when you
    > were with me.
    >

    You didn't see the entire plant.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  9. #9
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    On Wed, 24 Nov 2010 09:15:15 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:27:32 -0800, Christine Dabney
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:22:14 -0800, sf <sf@[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> >The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.

    >>
    >> No, they don't. You were with me, when we saw some at the Alemany
    >> market. They look like celery. I took a picture of them when you
    >> were with me.
    >>

    >You didn't see the entire plant.


    Yes we did. I posted the pic I took.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    On Nov 23, 9:27*pm, Christine Dabney <artis...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    > On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:22:14 -0800, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > >The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.

    >
    > No, they don't. You were with me, when we saw some at the Alemany
    > market. *They look like celery. I took a picture of them when *you
    > were with me.
    >
    > Christine
    > --http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com


    I'm confused as I had some cardoon plants, and they did flower like an
    artichoke...

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:51:51 -0800 (PST), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Nov 23, 9:22*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.http://plantdatabase.co.nz/Cardoonht...s/2009/03/card...
    > > I have no idea what they taste like. *I don't know which part of the
    > > plant to eat or how to cook it.

    >
    > Not so fast...LOL
    >
    > This is the pic I took of cardoons, when you came with me to the
    > Alemany market several years ago. I told you then, that I was taking a
    > pic to send to Nancy, cause she loves cardoons.
    > They look like celery to me..
    > http://i56.tinypic.com/jjlgyv.jpg
    >

    Why do you always feel the need to get into a pissing contest with me?
    I showed you what a cardoon looks like via google images, now I'll
    show you what *I* saw in England. http://oi55.tinypic.com/24uvk3d.jpg
    They look like artichokes to me.


    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  12. #12
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    On Wed, 24 Nov 2010 09:33:54 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:51:51 -0800 (PST), "[email protected]"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Nov 23, 9:22*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> > The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.http://plantdatabase.co.nz/Cardoonht...s/2009/03/card...
    >> > I have no idea what they taste like. *I don't know which part of the
    >> > plant to eat or how to cook it.

    >>
    >> Not so fast...LOL
    >>
    >> This is the pic I took of cardoons, when you came with me to the
    >> Alemany market several years ago. I told you then, that I was taking a
    >> pic to send to Nancy, cause she loves cardoons.
    >> They look like celery to me..
    >> http://i56.tinypic.com/jjlgyv.jpg
    >>

    >Why do you always feel the need to get into a pissing contest with me?
    >I showed you what a cardoon looks like via google images, now I'll
    >show you what *I* saw in England. http://oi55.tinypic.com/24uvk3d.jpg
    >They look like artichokes to me.


    Cardoon and artichoke are in the thistle family... the edible portion
    of cardoon does look like celery but before it's trimmed it looks like
    thistle as does artichoke.

  13. #13
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:22:14 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:


    >>The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.


    >No, they don't. You were with me, when we saw some at the Alemany
    >market. They look like celery. I took a picture of them when you
    >were with me.


    The ones I've seen definitely look like thistles. There are
    people who say the common invasive thistles growing around here
    are the same thing as cardoons, but I have not been able to
    confirm this.

    Steve

  14. #14
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:

    >http://i56.tinypic.com/jjlgyv.jpg


    I guess those are just the stalks.

    If one types "cardoon" into Google Images, about have the photos
    look like the above, and the rest are photos of thistles. If you
    look closely at some of the thistel photos, the stocks look
    somewhat like your photo (though not necessarily exactly).

    Steve

  15. #15
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:51:51 -0800 (PST), "[email protected]"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:


    > > This is the pic I took of cardoons, when you came with me to the
    > > Alemany market several years ago. I told you then, that I was taking a
    > > pic to send to Nancy, cause she loves cardoons.
    > > They look like celery to me..
    > > http://i56.tinypic.com/jjlgyv.jpg
    > >

    > Why do you always feel the need to get into a pissing contest with me?
    > I showed you what a cardoon looks like via google images, now I'll
    > show you what *I* saw in England. http://oi55.tinypic.com/24uvk3d.jpg
    > They look like artichokes to me.


    They are both the same species, Cynara cardunculus:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globe_artichoke

    Artichokes have been cultivated for their flower buds, cardoons for
    their stems.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  16. #16
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    >Cardoon and artichoke are in the thistle family... the edible portion
    >of cardoon does look like celery but before it's trimmed it looks like
    >thistle as does artichoke.


    Fancy Yuppite Restaurants will serve part of the thistle section...
    most typically I've seen them sliced longitudinally so that a given
    piece of cardoon on your plate has some of the stalk, some of the
    (miniscule) cardoon heart, and a pointy leaf or two.

    Steve

  17. #17
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:27:32 -0800, Christine Dabney
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:22:14 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > >The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.

    > >
    > > No, they don't. You were with me, when we saw some at the Alemany
    > > market. They look like celery. I took a picture of them when you
    > > were with me.
    > >

    > You didn't see the entire plant.


    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardoon>

    Since I've not been successful in my attempts to grow Artichokes (just
    too hot and dry here), I'm planning to eventually switch my attention to
    these and give them a try...
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or
    no influence on society. -- Mark Twain

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I showed you what a cardoon looks like via google images, now I'll
    > show you what *I* saw in England. http://oi55.tinypic.com/24uvk3d.jpg
    > They look like artichokes to me.


    sf, are the heads edible at all?
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or
    no influence on society. -- Mark Twain

  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    In article <ick5hj$df5$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:

    > Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:22:14 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > >>The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.

    >
    > >No, they don't. You were with me, when we saw some at the Alemany
    > >market. They look like celery. I took a picture of them when you
    > >were with me.

    >
    > The ones I've seen definitely look like thistles. There are
    > people who say the common invasive thistles growing around here
    > are the same thing as cardoons, but I have not been able to
    > confirm this.
    >
    > Steve


    I'd planned on trying the common thistle that grows a lot around here in
    the spring, but have not worked up the nerve yet. <g>
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or
    no influence on society. -- Mark Twain

  20. #20
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Cardoons?

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article<ick5hj$df5$[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:
    >
    >> Christine Dabney<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:22:14 -0800, sf<[email protected]> wrote:

    >>
    >>>> The cardoon plants I've seen *look* like artichokes, Tracy.

    >>
    >>> No, they don't. You were with me, when we saw some at the Alemany
    >>> market. They look like celery. I took a picture of them when you
    >>> were with me.

    >>
    >> The ones I've seen definitely look like thistles. There are
    >> people who say the common invasive thistles growing around here
    >> are the same thing as cardoons, but I have not been able to
    >> confirm this.
    >>
    >> Steve

    >
    > I'd planned on trying the common thistle that grows a lot around here in
    > the spring, but have not worked up the nerve yet.<g>


    I wish I had Euell (s?) Gibbons' books here.

    --
    Jean B.

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