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Thread: a Canadian term

  1. #61
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 09:30:30 -0500, George Leppla wrote:
    >
    >> On 10/9/2012 8:37 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>
    >> I think Sqwertz makes some very good and interesting food... including
    >> this sandwich... and I enjoy his photos.
    >>
    >> BUT - I have mentioned before that I think he tries to put too many
    >> flavors into one dish/sandwich. That meatball and cheese sub would be
    >> great on its own. The addition of two STRONG flavors (peppers and
    >> pepperoni) would kind of overpower the basic sandwich in my opinion.

    >
    > I like strongly flavored foods. The peperoncini are for tang and
    > texture most of all - and I'm glad I started adding them. The
    > pepperoni isn't very noticeable on here. And a BUNCH of places
    > (besides Subway) serve pepperoni on their meatball subs, with the
    > pepperoncini peppers. It's supposed to be a spicy, full-flavored
    > sandwich. It's a classic Italian-American sandwich - at least in
    > Pittsburgh where I came from.
    >


    If it is classic Italian-American, why did you use Greek pepperoncini? the
    Italians are better.



  2. #62
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 8 Oct 2012 23:32:53 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 00:20:05 -0400, Cheryl wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 10/7/2012 5:35 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    >>>> melting Iberico cheese:
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/
    >>>
    >>> I've never seen a meatball sub with pepperoni! But DAMN that looks
    >>> good.

    >>
    >> 29,500 hits for:
    >>
    >> "meatball and pepperoni" sandwich -subway

    >
    > And Papa John's just sent me an email introducing their Meatball and
    > Pepperoni pizza. They must have been reading this thread and copied
    > my idea.
    >
    > Earlier in the week Jack in the Box came out with a burger on a
    > pretzel roll, just a couple days after I posted my pretzel rolls to
    > Facebook. They copied my idea, too.
    >
    > It appears the restaurant marketing execs are following me around
    > copying my ideas for their next hot menu items.
    >
    > -sw


    The fertilizer companies need to get in on this action.



  3. #63
    sf Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 17:15:32 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    Pope) wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Mon, 8 Oct 2012 17:39:13 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve

    >
    > >> You would want to use a BBQ insert (which could just be another grill,
    > >> oriented perpendicularly to the first one; but I have invested in a
    > >> couple inserts and they make these things much easier).

    >
    > >Not sure what you mean by BBQ insert... are you talking about those
    > >metal thingies with holes that you put wood chips in?

    >
    > No; they are metal things with holes, but they hold the item
    > being cooked, not the wood chips. The wood chips can go directly
    > on top of the charcoals.
    >
    > They come in various shapes, some flat, some basket-shaped.
    >
    > Here's an example (called a "BBQ Wok" although that is a silly
    > name for it):
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/Danesco-150121.../dp/B0018C3D80
    >
    >

    Thanks, I'm familiar with the concept except I've never seen or heard
    them called an insert before. They usually have higher sides, so I
    can understand the "wok" term a little better than for the one in that
    image. If I sliced the corned beef thick, why would I need to put it
    on a perforated sheet like that? The slices should be too thick to
    flex and fall through the grate.


    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  4. #64
    sf Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 14:38:30 -0700, "Pico Rico" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news[email protected]..
    > > On Mon, 8 Oct 2012 23:32:53 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 00:20:05 -0400, Cheryl wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> On 10/7/2012 5:35 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    > >>>> melting Iberico cheese:
    > >>>>
    > >>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/
    > >>>
    > >>> I've never seen a meatball sub with pepperoni! But DAMN that looks
    > >>> good.
    > >>
    > >> 29,500 hits for:
    > >>
    > >> "meatball and pepperoni" sandwich -subway

    > >
    > > And Papa John's just sent me an email introducing their Meatball and
    > > Pepperoni pizza. They must have been reading this thread and copied
    > > my idea.
    > >
    > > Earlier in the week Jack in the Box came out with a burger on a
    > > pretzel roll, just a couple days after I posted my pretzel rolls to
    > > Facebook. They copied my idea, too.
    > >
    > > It appears the restaurant marketing execs are following me around
    > > copying my ideas for their next hot menu items.
    > >
    > > -sw

    >
    > The fertilizer companies need to get in on this action.
    >

    He's at the center of his own little universe.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  5. #65
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    [ BBQ "woks"/inserts ]

    >Thanks, I'm familiar with the concept except I've never seen or heard
    >them called an insert before. They usually have higher sides, so I
    >can understand the "wok" term a little better than for the one in that
    >image. If I sliced the corned beef thick, why would I need to put it
    >on a perforated sheet like that? The slices should be too thick to
    >flex and fall through the grate.


    You can do it just on top of the grill that came with your Weber.
    But in my experience, sometimes things fall through the grill and the
    insert doesn't have that problem; plus you can place/remove the
    insert with its contents in one move, without having to place/remove
    individual items (in this case, slices of corned beef) from a hot
    Weber. It ends up saving some work.

    Something like an eggplant, or steaks, the insert is unnecessary.
    Whereas something like fish, or smaller vegetables, it really helps. I
    suspect in the case of sliced corned beef, it would help although
    I haven't tried that yet.


    Steve

  6. #66
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 14:35:27 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 14:23:30 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 09:53:02 -0400, pavane wrote:
    >>
    >>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montreal-style_smoked_meat
    >>>
    >>> Fabulous picture in that article.

    >>
    >> Except for the big 'ol honking tail of fat with no meat attached to it
    >> trying to crawl away.

    >
    > I just now read te part that says they have a version of it that is
    > pure fat - no meat at all - just fat. Figures those Canadians would
    > find some way to tarnish an other otherwise fine sandwich tradition.


    Not to mention what they do to French fries!

    -sw

  7. #67
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 14:32:34 -0700, Pico Rico wrote:

    > "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news[email protected]..
    >> On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 09:30:30 -0500, George Leppla wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 10/9/2012 8:37 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I think Sqwertz makes some very good and interesting food... including
    >>> this sandwich... and I enjoy his photos.
    >>>
    >>> BUT - I have mentioned before that I think he tries to put too many
    >>> flavors into one dish/sandwich. That meatball and cheese sub would be
    >>> great on its own. The addition of two STRONG flavors (peppers and
    >>> pepperoni) would kind of overpower the basic sandwich in my opinion.

    >>
    >> I like strongly flavored foods. The peperoncini are for tang and
    >> texture most of all - and I'm glad I started adding them. The
    >> pepperoni isn't very noticeable on here. And a BUNCH of places
    >> (besides Subway) serve pepperoni on their meatball subs, with the
    >> pepperoncini peppers. It's supposed to be a spicy, full-flavored
    >> sandwich. It's a classic Italian-American sandwich - at least in
    >> Pittsburgh where I came from.
    >>

    >
    > If it is classic Italian-American, why did you use Greek pepperoncini? the
    > Italians are better.


    <yawn>

    -sw

  8. #68
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Michel Boucher <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    > in news:k51vuc$nq4$[email protected]:
    >
    >>>>>> Blatant stereotypes like your "American arrogance"
    >>>>>> comment?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> It was said in jest, something you seem to lack a fair
    >>>>> amount of...of which you seem to lack a fair
    >>>>> amount...whatever.
    >>>>
    >>>> Saying it in jest doesn't make if funny but it's a
    >>>> convenient claim.
    >>>
    >>> De gustibus et coloribus et jocularibus non disputantur.
    >>>
    >>> In other words, if you don't see the humour in it, that does
    >>> not mean it isn't funny. It just isn't funny to you.
    >>> Awwwwww.

    >>
    >> Most people don't find mindless stereotypes to be funny.
    >> However the expectation that everyone will laugh at your lack
    >> of social consciousness is mildly amusing.

    >
    > Just because you term it a stereotype, the better to disregard it,
    > does not mean it is untrue. Perhaps I should have said "thin-
    > skinned" instead. :-)


    And that would be different how?



  9. #69
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    in news:k5437d$b1k$[email protected]:

    >> Just because you term it a stereotype, the better to
    >> disregard it, does not mean it is untrue. Perhaps I should
    >> have said "thin- skinned" instead. :-)

    >
    > And that would be different how?


    Because being thin-skinned is an observable condition, like
    persistent conservatism, neither of which is curable.

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


  10. #70
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > On 07/10/2012 9:24 AM, sf wrote:
    > >
    > > What is Canadian smoked meat? Hubby ordered some and it looked
    > > (tasted) like a very lean piece of corned beef that had spent some
    > > time in the smoker.

    >
    > That's a good question. I have never heard of it. There is Montreal
    > Smoked Meat, which is a very good corned beef/ pastrami that originated
    > in a couple of very well known Montreal delis. Maybe it is like Canadian
    > bacon, a product apparently named for something we eat here, but unknown
    > in Canada by that name.


    Do you have anything called "American"?

  11. #71
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Michel Boucher <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    > in news:k5437d$b1k$[email protected]:
    >
    >>> Just because you term it a stereotype, the better to
    >>> disregard it, does not mean it is untrue. Perhaps I should
    >>> have said "thin- skinned" instead. :-)

    >>
    >> And that would be different how?

    >
    > Because being thin-skinned is an observable condition, like
    > persistent conservatism, neither of which is curable.


    As is being abrasive, intolerant, and gratuitously insulting. I'm no
    conservative by any definition, but I have no tolerance for your style of
    pissant posturing.

    You should realize there are plenty of stereotypes one could apply to French
    Canadians, none of which are particularly pleasant. I'm sure when you hear
    that crap, you take offense. If you can't understand why the same reaction
    applies to others when *you* spout your personal prejudices, then you need
    to seek treatment for your sociopathic tendencies.

    Time for you to go lay down somewhere and take your nap.



  12. #72
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    in news:k5483q$bf2$[email protected]:

    > You should realize there are plenty of stereotypes one could
    > apply to French Canadians, none of which are particularly
    > pleasant.


    Or true as opposed to sterotypes about USAians ;-)

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


  13. #73
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Michel Boucher <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    > in news:k5483q$bf2$[email protected]:
    >
    >> You should realize there are plenty of stereotypes one could
    >> apply to French Canadians, none of which are particularly
    >> pleasant.

    >
    > Or true as opposed to sterotypes about USAians ;-)


    So much for your phony hypocritical progressive bull****. You're a bigoted
    redneck, nothing more, never mind your location. Enjoy living with yourself,
    bigot.



  14. #74
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Michel Boucher <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Because being thin-skinned is an observable condition, like
    >persistent conservatism, neither of which is curable.


    I've concluded conservatism is an anger disorder. Something
    like "borderline personality". A diagnosable derangement.


    Steve

  15. #75
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Steve Pope wrote:

    > I've concluded conservatism is an anger disorder. Something
    > like "borderline personality". A diagnosable derangement.


    I think you're on to something. Now all we need is an efficacious
    treatment. So far, neither prolonged education nor reduced taxation
    has had any effect. I say we try forcible deprivation from religious
    rituals. That might cure some of them.



  16. #76
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On 10/10/2012 12:22 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > Dave Smith wrote:
    >>
    >> On 07/10/2012 9:24 AM, sf wrote:
    >>>
    >>> What is Canadian smoked meat? Hubby ordered some and it looked
    >>> (tasted) like a very lean piece of corned beef that had spent some
    >>> time in the smoker.

    >>
    >> That's a good question. I have never heard of it. There is Montreal
    >> Smoked Meat, which is a very good corned beef/ pastrami that originated
    >> in a couple of very well known Montreal delis. Maybe it is like Canadian
    >> bacon, a product apparently named for something we eat here, but unknown
    >> in Canada by that name.

    >
    > Do you have anything called "American"?
    >



    American Bacon? American smoked meat?

    No.


  17. #77
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    in news:k54csb$c4p$[email protected]:

    > Michel Boucher <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote in news:k5483q$bf2$[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> You should realize there are plenty of stereotypes one could
    >>> apply to French Canadians, none of which are particularly
    >>> pleasant.

    >>
    >> Or true as opposed to sterotypes about USAians ;-)

    >
    > So much for your phony hypocritical progressive bull****.
    > You're a bigoted redneck, nothing more, never mind your
    > location. Enjoy living with yourself, bigot.


    Pot...kettle...plonk

    --
    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


  18. #78
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote in news:k54cvf$ovc$1
    @blue-new.rahul.net:

    > Michel Boucher <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Because being thin-skinned is an observable condition, like
    >>persistent conservatism, neither of which is curable.

    >
    > I've concluded conservatism is an anger disorder. Something
    > like "borderline personality". A diagnosable derangement.


    Where does it sit in the DSM IV? I believe it is not curable
    because it hasn't yet been identified as a disorder or chemical
    imbalance in the brain. Research however is starting to reveal
    that an enlarged amygdala is double-plus ungood, brain-wise:

    http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/1012/10122301

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


  19. #79
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    George M. Middius <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Steve Pope wrote:
    >
    >> I've concluded conservatism is an anger disorder. Something
    >> like "borderline personality". A diagnosable derangement.

    >
    > I think you're on to something. Now all we need is an
    > efficacious treatment. So far, neither prolonged education nor
    > reduced taxation has had any effect. I say we try forcible
    > deprivation from religious rituals. That might cure some of
    > them.


    Or just convince them they are martyrs to their cause.

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


  20. #80
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:yKjds.39106$[email protected]:

    >>> That's a good question. I have never heard of it. There is
    >>> Montreal Smoked Meat, which is a very good corned beef/
    >>> pastrami that originated in a couple of very well known
    >>> Montreal delis. Maybe it is like Canadian bacon, a product
    >>> apparently named for something we eat here, but unknown
    >>> in Canada by that name.

    >>
    >> Do you have anything called "American"?

    >
    > American Bacon? American smoked meat?


    American butter tarts, American bars, poutine.

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


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