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Thread: a Canadian term

  1. #41
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 00:24:38 -0400, Cheryl wrote:

    > Congrats Steve! They're all prancing around trying to see who hates you
    > the most.


    Somebody has to bring all these motley people together and unite them
    into a common goal. It gives them a sense of purpose and brightens
    their lives, if even just a little.

    Gives me a warm fuzzy feeling, too.

    ObFood: Lay's Classic "Bacon, Lettuce, and Tomato" potato chips.
    Totally worthless. If you didn't know what flavor they were you'd
    never even come close to guessing BLT. Total FAIL.

    -sw

  2. #42
    sf Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 06:11:45 -0700, The Other Guy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 01:22:54 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >So... when people smoke a commercial corned beef for a few hours and
    > >call it pastrami, are they really making Canadian Smoked Meat? The
    > >article says we would call it "pastrami", but the meat hubby had
    > >tasted nothing like any pastrami I've ever eaten.

    >
    > No! Corned beef and pastrami have TOTALLY different spices.
    > The only thing the same is they're both brined.
    >

    Thanks!

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  3. #43
    sf Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Mon, 8 Oct 2012 17:39:13 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    Pope) wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 19:00:49 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve

    >
    > >> Well, when I was at Schwartz's, I saw them grilling the sliced
    > >> meat over very smoky coals, right before assembling it into
    > >> sandwiches, and in my estimate this could account for the entire
    > >> infusion of smoke taste in the meat.

    >
    > >Sounds like something that can be done at home. I've been tempted to
    > >try smoking corned beef in a Weber type grill, but figured I like deli
    > >pastrami just fine so it's not worth bothering with... however, hubby
    > >took to that smoked meat like a duck to water - so I think a little
    > >smoked meat experimenting is in our future.

    >
    > Sure, give it a shot. Slice some corned beef thickly (1/3"),
    > pepper it, get a even bed of charcoals going in the Weber, lay on a large
    > number of (ideally) maple wood chips, and then try grilling the
    > corned beef for 5 or 6 minutes, probably with the Weber's lid mostly on.
    >
    > You would want to use a BBQ insert (which could just be another grill,
    > oriented perpendicularly to the first one; but I have invested in a
    > couple inserts and they make these things much easier).
    >

    Not sure what you mean by BBQ insert... are you talking about those
    metal thingies with holes that you put wood chips in?


    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  4. #44
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 00:20:05 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 10/7/2012 5:35 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    >> melting Iberico cheese:
    >>
    >> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/

    >
    >I've never seen a meatball sub with pepperoni! But DAMN that looks good.


    The pepperoni makes it TIAD. And that roll has soggy crust, should
    have been toasted. And what are those green things, looks like pickle
    slices, with meatballs, BLECH! The Sqwertz truly has chronic TIAD.

  5. #45
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Michel Boucher <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I hope you're not suggesting that I should let him get away with
    > being a fathead. There are things that are worth addressing,
    > like blatant stereotypes.


    Blatant stereotypes like your "American arrogance" comment?

    (You will now claim that your use of this particular blatant stereotype is
    unique and justified somehow.)




  6. #46
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On 10/9/2012 8:37 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 00:20:05 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On 10/7/2012 5:35 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >>> ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    >>> melting Iberico cheese:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/

    >>
    >> I've never seen a meatball sub with pepperoni! But DAMN that looks good.

    >
    > The pepperoni makes it TIAD. And that roll has soggy crust, should
    > have been toasted. And what are those green things, looks like pickle
    > slices, with meatballs, BLECH! The Sqwertz truly has chronic TIAD.
    >



    I think Sqwertz makes some very good and interesting food... including
    this sandwich... and I enjoy his photos.

    BUT - I have mentioned before that I think he tries to put too many
    flavors into one dish/sandwich. That meatball and cheese sub would be
    great on its own. The addition of two STRONG flavors (peppers and
    pepperoni) would kind of overpower the basic sandwich in my opinion.

    But again, I think his basic sandwich would be wonderful.

    George L

  7. #47
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:k51cbe$j3d$[email protected]:

    > Blatant stereotypes like your "American arrogance" comment?


    It was said in jest, something you seem to lack a fair amount
    of...of which you seem to lack a fair amount...whatever.

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


  8. #48
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Cheryl wrote:

    > Congrats Steve! They're all prancing around trying to see who hates you
    > the most.


    Question for you: Are you and Jill the same poster? It's hard to
    believe two distinct people could be so identically obtuse.



  9. #49
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 09:30:30 -0500, George Leppla
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 10/9/2012 8:37 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 00:20:05 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 10/7/2012 5:35 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    >>>> melting Iberico cheese:
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/
    >>>
    >>> I've never seen a meatball sub with pepperoni! But DAMN that looks good.

    >>
    >> The pepperoni makes it TIAD. And that roll has soggy crust, should
    >> have been toasted. And what are those green things, looks like pickle
    >> slices, with meatballs, BLECH! The Sqwertz truly has chronic TIAD.
    >>

    >
    >
    >I think Sqwertz makes some very good and interesting food... including
    >this sandwich... and I enjoy his photos.
    >
    >BUT - I have mentioned before that I think he tries to put too many
    >flavors into one dish/sandwich. That meatball and cheese sub would be
    >great on its own. The addition of two STRONG flavors (peppers and
    >pepperoni) would kind of overpower the basic sandwich in my opinion.
    >
    >But again, I think his basic sandwich would be wonderful.
    >
    >George L


    Don't beat around the bush, just come out with it, you want to suck
    the dwarf's dick.

  10. #50
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tuesday, October 9, 2012 10:43:56 AM UTC-4, George M. Middius wrote:
    > Cheryl wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Congrats Steve! They're all prancing around trying to see who hates you

    >
    > > the most.

    >
    >
    >
    > Question for you: Are you and Jill the same poster? It's hard to
    >
    > believe two distinct people could be so identically obtuse.


    Question for you: **** off and die.

  11. #51
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 8 Oct 2012 17:39:13 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve


    >> You would want to use a BBQ insert (which could just be another grill,
    >> oriented perpendicularly to the first one; but I have invested in a
    >> couple inserts and they make these things much easier).


    >Not sure what you mean by BBQ insert... are you talking about those
    >metal thingies with holes that you put wood chips in?


    No; they are metal things with holes, but they hold the item
    being cooked, not the wood chips. The wood chips can go directly
    on top of the charcoals.

    They come in various shapes, some flat, some basket-shaped.

    Here's an example (called a "BBQ Wok" although that is a silly
    name for it):

    http://www.amazon.com/Danesco-150121.../dp/B0018C3D80


    Steve

  12. #52
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Michel Boucher <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:k51cbe$j3d$[email protected]:
    >
    >> Blatant stereotypes like your "American arrogance" comment?

    >
    > It was said in jest, something you seem to lack a fair amount
    > of...of which you seem to lack a fair amount...whatever.


    Saying it in jest doesn't make if funny but it's a convenient claim.



  13. #53
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    in news:k51sgo$v61$[email protected]:

    >>> Blatant stereotypes like your "American arrogance" comment?

    >>
    >> It was said in jest, something you seem to lack a fair amount
    >> of...of which you seem to lack a fair amount...whatever.

    >
    > Saying it in jest doesn't make if funny but it's a convenient
    > claim.


    De gustibus et coloribus et jocularibus non disputantur.

    In other words, if you don't see the humour in it, that does not
    mean it isn't funny. It just isn't funny to you. Awwwwww.

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


  14. #54
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Mon, 8 Oct 2012 23:32:53 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 00:20:05 -0400, Cheryl wrote:
    >
    >> On 10/7/2012 5:35 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >>> ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    >>> melting Iberico cheese:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/

    >>
    >> I've never seen a meatball sub with pepperoni! But DAMN that looks good.

    >
    > 29,500 hits for:
    >
    > "meatball and pepperoni" sandwich -subway


    And Papa John's just sent me an email introducing their Meatball and
    Pepperoni pizza. They must have been reading this thread and copied
    my idea.

    Earlier in the week Jack in the Box came out with a burger on a
    pretzel roll, just a couple days after I posted my pretzel rolls to
    Facebook. They copied my idea, too.

    It appears the restaurant marketing execs are following me around
    copying my ideas for their next hot menu items.

    -sw

  15. #55
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 09:30:30 -0500, George Leppla wrote:

    > On 10/9/2012 8:37 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    > I think Sqwertz makes some very good and interesting food... including
    > this sandwich... and I enjoy his photos.
    >
    > BUT - I have mentioned before that I think he tries to put too many
    > flavors into one dish/sandwich. That meatball and cheese sub would be
    > great on its own. The addition of two STRONG flavors (peppers and
    > pepperoni) would kind of overpower the basic sandwich in my opinion.


    I like strongly flavored foods. The peperoncini are for tang and
    texture most of all - and I'm glad I started adding them. The
    pepperoni isn't very noticeable on here. And a BUNCH of places
    (besides Subway) serve pepperoni on their meatball subs, with the
    pepperoncini peppers. It's supposed to be a spicy, full-flavored
    sandwich. It's a classic Italian-American sandwich - at least in
    Pittsburgh where I came from.

    I will admit that the "Four Treasure" chow fun yesterday was a little
    overboard,. I just happened to have small amounts of musgovian lamb,
    chicken, scallops, and shrimp that needed using up but each one was
    not enough to make a whole dish on it's own.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...in/photostream

    -sw

  16. #56
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 09:37:15 -0500, Michel Boucher wrote:

    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:k51cbe$j3d$[email protected]:
    >
    >> Blatant stereotypes like your "American arrogance" comment?

    >
    > It was said in jest, something you seem to lack a fair amount
    > of...of which you seem to lack a fair amount...whatever.


    Yeah it's all your fault, Marty.

    Michel has had the same MO here for a decade or two. He's just here
    to argue, and has never been especially good at it.

    -sw

  17. #57
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tuesday, October 9, 2012 1:26:00 PM UTC-6, Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 09:30:30 -0500, George Leppla wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On 10/9/2012 8:37 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I think Sqwertz makes some very good and interesting food... including

    >
    > > this sandwich... and I enjoy his photos.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > BUT - I have mentioned before that I think he tries to put too many

    >
    > > flavors into one dish/sandwich. That meatball and cheese sub would be

    >
    > > great on its own. The addition of two STRONG flavors (peppers and

    >
    > > pepperoni) would kind of overpower the basic sandwich in my opinion.

    >
    >
    >
    > I like strongly flavored foods. The peperoncini are for tang and
    >
    > texture most of all - and I'm glad I started adding them. The
    >
    > pepperoni isn't very noticeable on here. And a BUNCH of places
    >
    > (besides Subway) serve pepperoni on their meatball subs, with the
    >
    > pepperoncini peppers. It's supposed to be a spicy, full-flavored
    >
    > sandwich. It's a classic Italian-American sandwich - at least in
    >
    > Pittsburgh where I came from.
    >
    >
    >
    > I will admit that the "Four Treasure" chow fun yesterday was a little
    >
    > overboard,. I just happened to have small amounts of musgovian lamb,
    >
    > chicken, scallops, and shrimp that needed using up but each one was
    >
    > not enough to make a whole dish on it's own.
    >
    >
    >
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...in/photostream
    >
    >
    >
    > -sw


    Brilliant, just simply brilliant. Way to go.


  18. #58
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 06:11:45 -0700, The Other Guy wrote:

    > On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 01:22:54 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>So... when people smoke a commercial corned beef for a few hours and
    >>call it pastrami, are they really making Canadian Smoked Meat? The
    >>article says we would call it "pastrami", but the meat hubby had
    >>tasted nothing like any pastrami I've ever eaten.

    >
    > No! Corned beef and pastrami have TOTALLY different spices.
    > The only thing the same is they're both brined.


    You can keep repeating that but it's simply not true, Sheldon.

    -sw

  19. #59
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Michel Boucher <alsandorz@g.ma[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    > in news:k51sgo$v61$[email protected]:
    >
    >>>> Blatant stereotypes like your "American arrogance" comment?
    >>>
    >>> It was said in jest, something you seem to lack a fair amount
    >>> of...of which you seem to lack a fair amount...whatever.

    >>
    >> Saying it in jest doesn't make if funny but it's a convenient
    >> claim.

    >
    > De gustibus et coloribus et jocularibus non disputantur.
    >
    > In other words, if you don't see the humour in it, that does not
    > mean it isn't funny. It just isn't funny to you. Awwwwww.


    Most people don't find mindless stereotypes to be funny. However the
    expectation that everyone will laugh at your lack of social consciousness is
    mildly amusing.



  20. #60
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote
    in news:k51vuc$nq4$[email protected]:

    >>>>> Blatant stereotypes like your "American arrogance"
    >>>>> comment?
    >>>>
    >>>> It was said in jest, something you seem to lack a fair
    >>>> amount of...of which you seem to lack a fair
    >>>> amount...whatever.
    >>>
    >>> Saying it in jest doesn't make if funny but it's a
    >>> convenient claim.

    >>
    >> De gustibus et coloribus et jocularibus non disputantur.
    >>
    >> In other words, if you don't see the humour in it, that does
    >> not mean it isn't funny. It just isn't funny to you.
    >> Awwwwww.

    >
    > Most people don't find mindless stereotypes to be funny.
    > However the expectation that everyone will laugh at your lack
    > of social consciousness is mildly amusing.


    Just because you term it a stereotype, the better to disregard it,
    does not mean it is untrue. Perhaps I should have said "thin-
    skinned" instead. :-)

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


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