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Thread: a Canadian term

  1. #21
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 16:51:10 -0500, Michel Boucher wrote:

    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:131smt96ybunn$.[email protected]:
    >
    >> You're not exactly a role model for Canadians, Michel. Either
    >> is Dave. You both have a lot in common - you never post about
    >> cooking, just hover around and pounce on those non-food topics
    >> and arguments (which is why this was so easy).

    >
    > Totally untrue and I think Dave will back me up when I say "****
    > you, you weasely little ponce".


    In the 54 posts prior to this thread that you've made since 7/20/2012
    only 4 of them even mentioned food. Many of the others were
    anti-U.S-bashing and/or political posts. Thaty;s been you usual M.O
    for well over a decade. That makes you the hypocrite. Some goes for
    pussyfoot Dave.

    Reality sucks, eh? Don't cry. Just go away.

    Sincerely,

    Pimp Sqwertz (has a nice ring to it - thank you!)

  2. #22
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On 07/10/2012 5:51 PM, Michel Boucher wrote:
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:131smt96ybunn$.[email protected]:
    >
    >>>>> If fat is part of the tradition, in what way does it
    >>>>> tarnish said tradition? And it's not "Canadians", it's
    >>>>> members of the Montreal Jewish community who own and
    >>>>> operate these establshments (although most of the employees
    >>>>> now working at Schwartz's are Portuguese).
    >>>>
    >>>> You were responding to someone who is full of crap.
    >>>
    >>> I hope you're not suggesting that I should let him get away
    >>> with being a fathead. There are things that are worth
    >>> addressing, like blatant stereotypes.

    >>
    >> He says as he just disenfranchised the whole Montreal-Jewish
    >> community as "not Canadians".

    >
    > Reading not your forte? I didn't say anywhere that they weren't
    > Canadian (or that they were for that matter) but I was making a
    > proper attribution, unlike your uninformative stereotype.
    >
    >> You're not exactly a role model for Canadians, Michel. Either
    >> is Dave. You both have a lot in common - you never post about
    >> cooking, just hover around and pounce on those non-food topics
    >> and arguments (which is why this was so easy).

    >
    > Totally untrue and I think Dave will back me up when I say "****
    > you, you weasely little ponce".
    >





    Mais oui. But why do you even give him the time of day? He ain't worth
    it. Interesting that we are accused of hovering around and pouncing on
    non food topics in a thread where my comments were about "Canadian
    Smoked Meat" and clarifying that it is probably due to the well known
    (in Canada) Montreal smoked meat.

    That stuff is, the the best of my knowledge, primarily from two
    particular Montreal delis, both Jewish, and proudly Jewish. The twit
    might have been labouring under the impression that we think that being
    Jewish is a bad thing. I will give the Montreal Jewish the credit for
    also creating incredible bagels. There seems to be regional differences
    in bagels. Bagels in this corner of the world suck the big one.
    Montreal bagels OTOH, are incredible, and they are produced by a number
    of Jewish run bagel shops.

    FWIW when my son was managing a restaurant for a franchise whose
    Canadian operation was based in Montreal, one of their menu items was
    smoked salmon on a Montreal bagel. I don't think there is any slur
    attached to attributing the concept of smoked salmon on a bagel with
    cream cheese to Jews. He was very happy to find a restaurant in his
    neighbourhood that made incredible Montreal Jewish style bagels, but
    the bakery was run by a Lebanese couple.






  3. #23
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Sunday, October 7, 2012 3:35:38 PM UTC-6, Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 15:04:27 -0500, Michel Boucher wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote in

    >
    > > news:v3lcs.13855$[email protected]:

    >
    > >

    >
    > >>> If fat is part of the tradition, in what way does it tarnish

    >
    > >>> said tradition? And it's not "Canadians", it's members of

    >
    > >>> the Montreal Jewish community who own and operate these

    >
    > >>> establshments (although most of the employees now working at

    >
    > >>> Schwartz's are Portuguese).

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> You were responding to someone who is full of crap.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I hope you're not suggesting that I should let him get away with

    >
    > > being a fathead. There are things that are worth addressing,

    >
    > > like blatant stereotypes.

    >
    >
    >
    > He says as he just disenfranchised the whole Montreal-Jewish community
    >
    > as "not Canadians".
    >
    >
    >
    > You're not exactly a role model for Canadians, Michel. Either is
    >
    > Dave. You both have a lot in common - you never post about cooking,
    >
    > just hover around and pounce on those non-food topics and arguments
    >
    > (which is why this was so easy).
    >
    >
    >
    > ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    >
    > melting Iberico cheese:
    >
    >
    >
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/
    >
    >
    >
    > -sw


    So were did you get the "afterbirth" for that picture Squertzie?


  4. #24
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Sunday, October 7, 2012 3:51:11 PM UTC-6, Michel Boucher wrote:
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote in
    >
    > news:131smt96ybunn$.[email protected]:
    >
    >
    >
    > >>>> If fat is part of the tradition, in what way does it

    >
    > >>>> tarnish said tradition? And it's not "Canadians", it's

    >
    > >>>> members of the Montreal Jewish community who own and

    >
    > >>>> operate these establshments (although most of the employees

    >
    > >>>> now working at Schwartz's are Portuguese).

    >
    > >>>

    >
    > >>> You were responding to someone who is full of crap.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> I hope you're not suggesting that I should let him get away

    >
    > >> with being a fathead. There are things that are worth

    >
    > >> addressing, like blatant stereotypes.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > He says as he just disenfranchised the whole Montreal-Jewish

    >
    > > community as "not Canadians".

    >
    >
    >
    > Reading not your forte? I didn't say anywhere that they weren't
    >
    > Canadian (or that they were for that matter) but I was making a
    >
    > proper attribution, unlike your uninformative stereotype.
    >
    >
    >
    > > You're not exactly a role model for Canadians, Michel. Either

    >
    > > is Dave. You both have a lot in common - you never post about

    >
    > > cooking, just hover around and pounce on those non-food topics

    >
    > > and arguments (which is why this was so easy).

    >
    >
    >
    > Totally untrue and I think Dave will back me up when I say "****
    >
    > you, you weasely little ponce".
    >

    And I agree. We have to stick together on that one.

  5. #25
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    "graham" <[email protected]> wrote in news:lUmcs.4828$mt1.711
    @newsfe21.iad:

    >> Totally untrue and I think Dave will back me up when I say "****
    >> you, you weasely little ponce".`

    >
    > You might have called him "un enculé" {;-)


    I doubt he would know the meaning.

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


  6. #26
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:uoncs.26037$[email protected]:

    > That stuff is, the the best of my knowledge, primarily from
    > two particular Montreal delis, both Jewish, and proudly
    > Jewish. The twit might have been labouring under the
    > impression that we think that being Jewish is a bad thing. I
    > will give the Montreal Jewish the credit for also creating
    > incredible bagels. There seems to be regional differences in
    > bagels. Bagels in this corner of the world suck the big one.
    > Montreal bagels OTOH, are incredible, and they are produced by
    > a number of Jewish run bagel shops.


    Get a Kettleman's franchise set up in your area.

    > FWIW when my son was managing a restaurant for a franchise
    > whose Canadian operation was based in Montreal, one of their
    > menu items was smoked salmon on a Montreal bagel. I don't
    > think there is any slur attached to attributing the concept
    > of smoked salmon on a bagel with cream cheese to Jews. He was
    > very happy to find a restaurant in his neighbourhood that made
    > incredible Montreal Jewish style bagels, but the bakery was
    > run by a Lebanese couple.


    It's obviously a skill that can be acquired.

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


  7. #27
    sf Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 10:18:56 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Oct 7, 10:07*am, The Other Guy <KnewsKg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 09:53:02 -0400, "pavane" <pav...@leisure.org>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > >"Michel Boucher" <alsand...@g.mail.com> wrote in message
    > > >news:[email protected] ...
    > > >> spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote in
    > > >>news:k4rvv0$bul$[email protected]:

    > >
    > > >>> sf *<sf.use...@gmail.com> wrote:

    > >
    > > >>>>What is Canadian smoked meat? *Hubby ordered some and it
    > > >>>>looked (tasted) like a very lean piece of corned beef that had
    > > >>>>spent some time in the smoker.

    > >
    > > >>> It is a corned beef / pastrami-like preparation that is
    > > >>> (usually) grilled just before serving under smoky conditions
    > > >>> (say on a wood/charcoal grill).

    > >
    > > >>> I do not think it normally has been in a true smoker.

    > >
    > > >>> Anyway, it's pretty much as you describe. *Also called
    > > >>> "Montreal smoked meat".

    > >
    > > >>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montreal-style_smoked_meat

    > >
    > > >Fabulous picture in that article. I have always considered
    > > >Montreal smoked meat as the epitome of the existence
    > > >of a god or two in our universe. I never could figure out why
    > > >it never became popular in the US. It is so superior to the
    > > >common corned beef or pastrami.

    > >
    > > I'd love to try it, but while a search brings up plenty
    > > of info on HOW to make it, and delis that serve it (east
    > > coast mostly), I don't see anyplace selling it for shipping.
    > >

    >
    > The preparation is part of the presentation. You wouldn't expect to
    > get scrambled eggs by overnight delivery, right?
    >
    > http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?sec...nts&id=8575885


    So... when people smoke a commercial corned beef for a few hours and
    call it pastrami, are they really making Canadian Smoked Meat? The
    article says we would call it "pastrami", but the meat hubby had
    tasted nothing like any pastrami I've ever eaten.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  8. #28
    sf Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 19:00:49 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    Pope) wrote:
    >
    > Well, when I was at Schwartz's, I saw them grilling the sliced
    > meat over very smoky coals, right before assembling it into
    > sandwiches, and in my estimate this could account for the entire
    > infusion of smoke taste in the meat.
    >

    Sounds like something that can be done at home. I've been tempted to
    try smoking corned beef in a Weber type grill, but figured I like deli
    pastrami just fine so it's not worth bothering with... however, hubby
    took to that smoked meat like a duck to water - so I think a little
    smoked meat experimenting is in our future.



    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  9. #29
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    > melting Iberico cheese:
    >
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/
    >
    > -sw


    There you go again, Steve. YUM! (any onions?)
    Regardless, good luck finding *that* at Subway, folks.

    G.

  10. #30
    The Other Guy Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 01:22:54 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:


    >So... when people smoke a commercial corned beef for a few hours and
    >call it pastrami, are they really making Canadian Smoked Meat? The
    >article says we would call it "pastrami", but the meat hubby had
    >tasted nothing like any pastrami I've ever eaten.


    No! Corned beef and pastrami have TOTALLY different spices.
    The only thing the same is they're both brined.





    To reply by email, lose the Ks...


  11. #31
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    Michel Boucher wrote:

    > > You're not exactly a role model for Canadians, Michel.


    > Totally untrue and I think Dave will back me up when I say "****
    > you, you weasely little ponce".


    Sorry to tell you this, but sqwishy's ego is hermetically sealed in an
    inch-thick crust of petrified pastry. If you want to trigger his
    self-doubt reflex, you need to attack his phoney altruism.



  12. #32
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 19:00:49 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve


    >> Well, when I was at Schwartz's, I saw them grilling the sliced
    >> meat over very smoky coals, right before assembling it into
    >> sandwiches, and in my estimate this could account for the entire
    >> infusion of smoke taste in the meat.


    >Sounds like something that can be done at home. I've been tempted to
    >try smoking corned beef in a Weber type grill, but figured I like deli
    >pastrami just fine so it's not worth bothering with... however, hubby
    >took to that smoked meat like a duck to water - so I think a little
    >smoked meat experimenting is in our future.


    Sure, give it a shot. Slice some corned beef thickly (1/3"),
    pepper it, get a even bed of charcoals going in the Weber, lay on a large
    number of (ideally) maple wood chips, and then try grilling the
    corned beef for 5 or 6 minutes, probably with the Weber's lid mostly on.

    You would want to use a BBQ insert (which could just be another grill,
    oriented perpendicularly to the first one; but I have invested in a
    couple inserts and they make these things much easier).

    Steve

  13. #33
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 06:57:32 -0400, Gary wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >> ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    >> melting Iberico cheese:
    >>
    >> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/

    >
    > There you go again, Steve. YUM! (any onions?)
    > Regardless, good luck finding *that* at Subway, folks.


    There's onion in the meatballs and in the sauce. Garlic dill
    peperoncinis between the two meats.

    -sw

  14. #34
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 17:16:10 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 16:51:10 -0500, Michel Boucher wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:131smt96ybunn$.[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> You're not exactly a role model for Canadians, Michel. Either
    >>> is Dave. You both have a lot in common - you never post about
    >>> cooking, just hover around and pounce on those non-food topics
    >>> and arguments (which is why this was so easy).

    >>
    >> Totally untrue and I think Dave will back me up when I say "****
    >> you, you weasely little ponce".

    >
    > In the 54 posts prior to this thread that you've made since 7/20/2012
    > only 4 of them even mentioned food. Many of the others were
    > anti-U.S-bashing and/or political posts


    Sure got quiet in here all the sudden. Score one for the "weasely
    little ponces".

    -sw

  15. #35
    Michel Boucher Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    George M. Middius <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >> Totally untrue and I think Dave will back me up when I say
    >> "**** you, you weasely little ponce".

    >
    > Sorry to tell you this, but sqwishy's ego is hermetically
    > sealed in an inch-thick crust of petrified pastry. If you want
    > to trigger his self-doubt reflex, you need to attack his
    > phoney altruism.


    If I had any interest in appealing to anything, I would not have
    killfiled him for the second time. My plonk file was wiped out so
    I have to rebuild it.

    --

    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected
    from happening.

    -- Barbara Tober


  16. #36
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On 08/10/2012 12:54 PM, George M. Middius wrote:
    > Michel Boucher wrote:
    >
    >>> You're not exactly a role model for Canadians, Michel.

    >
    >> Totally untrue and I think Dave will back me up when I say "****
    >> you, you weasely little ponce".

    >
    > Sorry to tell you this, but sqwishy's ego is hermetically sealed in an
    > inch-thick crust of petrified pastry. If you want to trigger his
    > self-doubt reflex, you need to attack his phoney altruism.
    >
    >



    It's so much easier to simply kill file him and to deny him the
    attention he apparently craves.

  17. #37
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 13:45:39 -0500, Michel Boucher wrote:

    > George M. Middius <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>> Totally untrue and I think Dave will back me up when I say
    >>> "**** you, you weasely little ponce".

    >>
    >> Sorry to tell you this, but sqwishy's ego is hermetically
    >> sealed in an inch-thick crust of petrified pastry. If you want
    >> to trigger his self-doubt reflex, you need to attack his
    >> phoney altruism.

    >
    > If I had any interest in appealing to anything, I would not have
    > killfiled him for the second time. My plonk file was wiped out so
    > I have to rebuild it.


    Ahh, the 'ol "I'm pretending I didn't see the post where you drilled
    me a new asshole"-routine.

    Seen that plenty of times before.

    -sw

  18. #38
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On 10/7/2012 5:35 PM, Sqwertz wrote:

    > ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    > melting Iberico cheese:
    >
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/


    I've never seen a meatball sub with pepperoni! But DAMN that looks good.

  19. #39
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On 10/8/2012 2:45 PM, Michel Boucher wrote:

    > George M. Middius <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>> Totally untrue and I think Dave will back me up when I say
    >>> "**** you, you weasely little ponce".

    >>
    >> Sorry to tell you this, but sqwishy's ego is hermetically
    >> sealed in an inch-thick crust of petrified pastry. If you want
    >> to trigger his self-doubt reflex, you need to attack his
    >> phoney altruism.

    >
    > If I had any interest in appealing to anything, I would not have
    > killfiled him for the second time. My plonk file was wiped out so
    > I have to rebuild it.
    >


    Congrats Steve! They're all prancing around trying to see who hates you
    the most.


  20. #40
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: a Canadian term

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 00:20:05 -0400, Cheryl wrote:

    > On 10/7/2012 5:35 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> ObFood: The perfect meatball and pepperoni sub, with gravity defying
    >> melting Iberico cheese:
    >>
    >> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/

    >
    > I've never seen a meatball sub with pepperoni! But DAMN that looks good.


    29,500 hits for:

    "meatball and pepperoni" sandwich -subway

    (Had to exclude Subway since that's how they make theirs - with fake
    pepperoni)

    -sw

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