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Thread: Called spring greens in England

  1. #1
    Pat Mc Guest

    Default Called spring greens in England


    I have just joined this forum - being of English roots - living in
    America - getting older and more time for my vegetable garden - what can
    I grow to be the equivalent of "spring greens" in England?

    Thanks




    --
    Pat Mc

  2. #2
    John John Guest

    Default Re: Called spring greens in England

    On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 17:42:05 +0000, Pat Mc
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I have just joined this forum - being of English roots - living in
    >America - getting older and more time for my vegetable garden - what can
    >I grow to be the equivalent of "spring greens" in England?


    "These are young cabbages which are harvested before they form a
    'heart' and have tender, loose leaves."

    Says http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/spring_greens

    --
    John




  3. #3
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: Called spring greens in England

    "Pat Mc" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I have just joined this forum - being of English roots - living in
    > America - getting older and more time for my vegetable garden - what can
    > I grow to be the equivalent of "spring greens" in England?
    >
    > Thanks


    welcome!

    What are "spring greens"... "welcome!"
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4L_y9isEBCs



  4. #4
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: Called spring greens in England

    "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:k4sscn$b47$[email protected]..

    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4L_y9isEBCs


    I miss Ronno...



  5. #5
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Called spring greens in England

    On Oct 7, 12:42*pm, Pat Mc <Pat.Mc.ab7a308.233...@foodbanter.com>
    wrote:
    >
    > I have just joined this forum - being of English roots - living in
    > America - getting older and more time for my vegetable garden - what can
    > I grow to be the equivalent of "spring greens" in England?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    > Pat Mc
    >
    >

    After your membership dues are received we'll discuss "spring greens."


  6. #6
    Malcolm Loades Guest

    Default Re: Called spring greens in England

    In message <[email protected]>, Pat Mc
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >I have just joined this forum - being of English roots - living in
    >America - getting older and more time for my vegetable garden - what
    >can
    >I grow to be the equivalent of "spring greens" in England?
    >

    In the UK I've seen Collard Greens referred to as the American term for
    Spring Greens.

    Malcolm

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Called spring greens in England

    On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 08:30:12 +1100, John John <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 17:42:05 +0000, Pat Mc
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >I have just joined this forum - being of English roots - living in
    > >America - getting older and more time for my vegetable garden - what can
    > >I grow to be the equivalent of "spring greens" in England?

    >
    > "These are young cabbages which are harvested before they form a
    > 'heart' and have tender, loose leaves."
    >
    > Says http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/spring_greens


    Interesting! I'm only familiar with "Spring Mix" which is salad
    greens. I bet baby bok choy would be a good substitute.



    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Mushrooms - was: Called spring greens in England

    On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 08:30:12 +1100, John John <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >
    > Says http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/spring_greens


    One of the links is to a recipe for mushroom ragout
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/nutmegmash_70579

    I need some help with translation

    "chestnut mushrooms" - aka: cremini?

    "field mushrooms" - are these what we'd call "wild" mushrooms (such
    as shiitake, enoki and oyster) that have been commercially grown and
    can be purchased in a grocery store now?



    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  9. #9
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: Called spring greens in England

    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 08:30:12 +1100, John John <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >> Says http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/spring_greens

    >
    > Interesting! I'm only familiar with "Spring Mix" which is salad
    > greens. I bet baby bok choy would be a good substitute.



    Are they similar to collard greens? I had to eat some kale the other day...
    eww

    I try spring mix once in while. But I feel like I'm eating grass (not the
    good kind). And I'm veggie. Even with blue cheese all over it, I have
    trouble eating it.



  10. #10
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: Mushrooms - was: Called spring greens in England

    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 08:30:12 +1100, John John <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >>
    >> Says http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/spring_greens

    >
    > One of the links is to a recipe for mushroom ragout
    > http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/nutmegmash_70579
    >
    > I need some help with translation
    >
    > "chestnut mushrooms" - aka: cremini?
    >
    > "field mushrooms" - are these what we'd call "wild" mushrooms (such
    > as shiitake, enoki and oyster) that have been commercially grown and
    > can be purchased in a grocery store now?



    Are those Chinese potatoes? The ex would always make fun of me when we got
    Chinese and I would say "I really like these Chinese potatoes they put in my
    mixed vegetables"



  11. #11
    Malcolm Loades Guest

    Default Re: Mushrooms - was: Called spring greens in England

    In message <[email protected]>, sf
    <[email protected]> writes
    >On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 08:30:12 +1100, John John <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >>
    >> Says http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/spring_greens

    >
    >One of the links is to a recipe for mushroom ragout
    >http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/nutmegmash_70579
    >
    >I need some help with translation
    >
    >"chestnut mushrooms" - aka: cremini?


    Yes, cremini.
    >
    >"field mushrooms" - are these what we'd call "wild" mushrooms (such
    >as shiitake, enoki and oyster) that have been commercially grown and
    >can be purchased in a grocery store now?


    No, their equivalent would be the regular white mushrooms on sale
    everywhere. The bigger and more open they are the better they would be
    for this recipe.

    Malcolm

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