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Thread: Cake Cooling

  1. #1
    Goomba Guest

    Default Cake Cooling

    For you cake baking pros out there- do you cool the cake in the pans
    entirely or turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling?

    I just baked a banana cake and let the two layers cool in the pan aprox
    20 min, then turned out onto a rack. Now I find the tops have stuck to
    the rack and left a nice gouge in each one. I can handle that since I'm
    going to assemble with some sort of filling before frosting. I think I
    can hide the gouges. But it got me to wondering if I'd forgotten some
    rule of cake cooling....?

    (and I know I goofed leaving them upside down on the rack as perhaps the
    bottoms were sturdier)

    Goomba

  2. #2
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    On Mar 30, 12:16*pm, Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > For you cake baking pros out there- do you cool the cake in the pans
    > entirely or turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling?
    >
    > I just baked a banana cake and let the two layers cool in the pan aprox
    > 20 min, then turned out onto a rack. Now I find the tops have stuck to
    > the rack and left a nice gouge in each one. *I can handle that since I'm
    > going to assemble with some sort of filling before frosting. I think I
    > can hide the gouges. *But it got me to wondering if I'd forgotten some
    > rule of cake cooling....?
    >
    > (and I know I goofed leaving them upside down on the rack as perhaps the
    > bottoms were sturdier)
    >
    > Goomba


    I usually let cool for about 10 minutes, but it also depends on the
    cake. I used to work at a bakery that would take them out immediately
    after pulling from the oven. BTW, you can always cut off the top to
    make your layers more even for filling/icing...

  3. #3
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    On Tue 30 Mar 2010 12:16:36p, Goomba told us...

    > For you cake baking pros out there- do you cool the cake in the pans
    > entirely or turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling?
    >
    > I just baked a banana cake and let the two layers cool in the pan aprox
    > 20 min, then turned out onto a rack. Now I find the tops have stuck to
    > the rack and left a nice gouge in each one. I can handle that since I'm
    > going to assemble with some sort of filling before frosting. I think I
    > can hide the gouges. But it got me to wondering if I'd forgotten some
    > rule of cake cooling....?
    >
    > (and I know I goofed leaving them upside down on the rack as perhaps the
    > bottoms were sturdier)
    >
    > Goomba
    >


    Usually, for cake layers, 10 minutes in the pan on a rack is sufficient.
    Then turn out on the rack and invert immediately onto anothe rack so that
    the bottom is on the bottom.

    Most likely what happened in your longer cooling in the pan allowed the
    cake to "sweat" and the moisture made it stick to the pan.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  4. #4
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    Goomba wrote:
    > For you cake baking pros out there- do you cool the cake in the pans
    > entirely or turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling?
    >
    > I just baked a banana cake and let the two layers cool in the pan aprox
    > 20 min, then turned out onto a rack. Now I find the tops have stuck to
    > the rack and left a nice gouge in each one. I can handle that since I'm
    > going to assemble with some sort of filling before frosting. I think I
    > can hide the gouges. But it got me to wondering if I'd forgotten some
    > rule of cake cooling....?
    >


    I turn them out onto the rack after 5-10 minutes or the bottom gets
    soggy. The trick is to flip the pans onto a rack, then flip the cakes
    onto another one or you will get stripes or squares pressed into the
    tops, the same pattern as your cooling racks.

    gloria p

  5. #5
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    > For you cake baking pros out there- do you cool the cake in the pans
    > entirely or turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling?
    >
    > I just baked a banana cake and let the two layers cool in the pan aprox
    > 20 min, then turned out onto a rack. Now I find the tops have stuck to
    > the rack and left a nice gouge in each one. I can handle that since I'm
    > going to assemble with some sort of filling before frosting. I think I
    > can hide the gouges. But it got me to wondering if I'd forgotten some
    > rule of cake cooling....?
    >
    > (and I know I goofed leaving them upside down on the rack as perhaps the
    > bottoms were sturdier)
    >
    > Goomba


    If I'm going to take the cake out of the pan/s:
    Cool in the pan on a rack for 15 minutes.
    Invert on rack, place another rack on top (actually the bottom of the
    layer), and flip it over. Now you're top side up.
    If you have two layers, you need three racks. I have four.

    When you assemble a layer cake, the bottom layer goes topside down onto
    your serving plate, filling or frosting added, top layer goes on right
    side up. Finish icing.

    Wrapping the outside of the pan with dampened terrycloth toweling before
    pouring the batter in will keep a hump from forming in the middle of the
    layer.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Angel Food Dessert, March 23, 2010

  6. #6
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    gloria.p wrote:

    > I turn them out onto the rack after 5-10 minutes or the bottom gets
    > soggy. The trick is to flip the pans onto a rack, then flip the cakes
    > onto another one or you will get stripes or squares pressed into the
    > tops, the same pattern as your cooling racks.
    >
    > gloria p


    Why yes I did! My goal was to bake these layers and freeze them so that
    I could get the baking out of the way when I have company next week. I
    want to make some desserts. But now I'm tempted to cut into and sample
    one of these layers.

    Just did. Delicious....but now I'll have to make another cake! LOL

  7. #7
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > Wrapping the outside of the pan with dampened terrycloth toweling before
    > pouring the batter in will keep a hump from forming in the middle of the
    > layer.
    >

    huh? I've never heard of such a thing! You bake it with a damp towel
    around it...or what?

  8. #8
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    On Tue 30 Mar 2010 03:31:34p, Melba's Jammin' told us...

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> For you cake baking pros out there- do you cool the cake in the pans
    >> entirely or turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling?
    >>
    >> I just baked a banana cake and let the two layers cool in the pan aprox
    >> 20 min, then turned out onto a rack. Now I find the tops have stuck to
    >> the rack and left a nice gouge in each one. I can handle that since I'm
    >> going to assemble with some sort of filling before frosting. I think I
    >> can hide the gouges. But it got me to wondering if I'd forgotten some
    >> rule of cake cooling....?
    >>
    >> (and I know I goofed leaving them upside down on the rack as perhaps the
    >> bottoms were sturdier)
    >>
    >> Goomba

    >
    > If I'm going to take the cake out of the pan/s:
    > Cool in the pan on a rack for 15 minutes.
    > Invert on rack, place another rack on top (actually the bottom of the
    > layer), and flip it over. Now you're top side up.
    > If you have two layers, you need three racks. I have four.
    >
    > When you assemble a layer cake, the bottom layer goes topside down onto
    > your serving plate, filling or frosting added, top layer goes on right
    > side up. Finish icing.
    >
    > Wrapping the outside of the pan with dampened terrycloth toweling before
    > pouring the batter in will keep a hump from forming in the middle of the
    > layer.
    >


    Toweling works great, but I like the convenience of the "magic strips".
    I've had a set for over 20 years, so they'll probably not need replacing.
    The principle is the same, as the interior of the strip is absorbant fabric
    that you saturate with water, then squeeze out the excess.


    http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Small-B.../dp/B0000DDXL8

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  9. #9
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    On Mar 30, 6:31*pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    wrote:
    > In article <81f10pFpa...@mid.individual.net>,
    >
    > *Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > > For you cake baking pros out there- do you cool the cake in the pans
    > > entirely or turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling?

    >
    > > I just baked a banana cake and let the two layers cool in the pan aprox
    > > 20 min, then turned out onto a rack. Now I find the tops have stuck to
    > > the rack and left a nice gouge in each one. *I can handle that since I'm
    > > going to assemble with some sort of filling before frosting. I think I
    > > can hide the gouges. *But it got me to wondering if I'd forgotten some
    > > rule of cake cooling....?

    >
    > > (and I know I goofed leaving them upside down on the rack as perhaps the
    > > bottoms were sturdier)

    >
    > > Goomba

    >
    > If I'm going to take the cake out of the pan/s:
    > Cool in the pan on a rack for 15 minutes.
    > Invert on rack, place another rack on top (actually the bottom of the
    > layer), and flip it over. *Now you're top side up. *
    > If you have two layers, you need three racks. *I have four.
    >
    > When you assemble a layer cake, the bottom layer goes topside down onto
    > your serving plate, filling or frosting added, top layer goes on right
    > side up. *Finish icing. *
    >
    > Wrapping the outside of the pan with dampened terrycloth toweling before
    > pouring the batter in will keep a hump from forming in the middle of the
    > layer.
    >
    > --
    > Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJhttp://web.me.com/barbschaller
    > Angel Food Dessert, March 23, 2010


    How do you keep the ends attached to each other? Safety pins? Just
    curious, not trying to be a wise behind.


  10. #10
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    In article <8[email protected]>,
    Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > > Wrapping the outside of the pan with dampened terrycloth toweling before
    > > pouring the batter in will keep a hump from forming in the middle of the
    > > layer.
    > >

    > huh? I've never heard of such a thing! You bake it with a damp towel
    > around it...or what?


    Correct. I'm not surprised you've never heard of it but it's
    information that serious cake decorators know about. :-) Google up
    "cake cooling strips." Terry toweling is cheaper and works as well.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Angel Food Dessert, March 23, 2010

  11. #11
    Karen AKA Kajikit Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    On Tue, 30 Mar 2010 15:16:36 -0400, Goomba <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >For you cake baking pros out there- do you cool the cake in the pans
    >entirely or turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling?
    >
    >I just baked a banana cake and let the two layers cool in the pan aprox
    >20 min, then turned out onto a rack. Now I find the tops have stuck to
    >the rack and left a nice gouge in each one. I can handle that since I'm
    >going to assemble with some sort of filling before frosting. I think I
    >can hide the gouges. But it got me to wondering if I'd forgotten some
    >rule of cake cooling....?
    >
    >(and I know I goofed leaving them upside down on the rack as perhaps the
    >bottoms were sturdier)
    >
    >Goomba


    Cool them in the pan for a minute or so then get a PAIR of cooling
    racks. Invert the cake onto the first rack and then put the other rack
    on top of it and flip it so that the cake is sitting on its base. The
    bottom of the cake doesn't stick to the rack like the top.
    --

    Karen aka Kajikit
    http://kajikitscorner.com
    http://kajikit.blogspot.com
    If you want to send me an email please send it to kajikit AT gmail DOT com, not the addy in this message.

  12. #12
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mar 30, 6:31*pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    > wrote:
    > > In article <81f10pFpa...@mid.individual.net>,
    > >
    > > *Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > > > For you cake baking pros out there- do you cool the cake in the pans
    > > > entirely or turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling?

    > >
    > > > I just baked a banana cake and let the two layers cool in the pan aprox
    > > > 20 min, then turned out onto a rack. Now I find the tops have stuck to
    > > > the rack and left a nice gouge in each one. *I can handle that since I'm
    > > > going to assemble with some sort of filling before frosting. I think I
    > > > can hide the gouges. *But it got me to wondering if I'd forgotten some
    > > > rule of cake cooling....?

    > >
    > > > (and I know I goofed leaving them upside down on the rack as perhaps the
    > > > bottoms were sturdier)

    > >
    > > > Goomba

    > >
    > > If I'm going to take the cake out of the pan/s:
    > > Cool in the pan on a rack for 15 minutes.
    > > Invert on rack, place another rack on top (actually the bottom of the
    > > layer), and flip it over. *Now you're top side up. *
    > > If you have two layers, you need three racks. *I have four.
    > >
    > > When you assemble a layer cake, the bottom layer goes topside down onto
    > > your serving plate, filling or frosting added, top layer goes on right
    > > side up. *Finish icing. *
    > >
    > > Wrapping the outside of the pan with dampened terrycloth toweling before
    > > pouring the batter in will keep a hump from forming in the middle of the
    > > layer.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJhttp://web.me.com/barbschaller
    > > Angel Food Dessert, March 23, 2010

    >
    > How do you keep the ends attached to each other? Safety pins? Just
    > curious, not trying to be a wise behind.


    No problem. I forgot to include that info. I used T-pins.


    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Angel Food Dessert, March 23, 2010

  13. #13
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling


    "Goomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > For you cake baking pros out there- do you cool the cake in the pans
    > entirely or turn out onto a cooling rack to finish cooling?
    >
    > I just baked a banana cake and let the two layers cool in the pan aprox 20
    > min, then turned out onto a rack. Now I find the tops have stuck to the
    > rack and left a nice gouge in each one. I can handle that since I'm going
    > to assemble with some sort of filling before frosting. I think I can hide
    > the gouges. But it got me to wondering if I'd forgotten some rule of cake
    > cooling....?
    >
    > (and I know I goofed leaving them upside down on the rack as perhaps the
    > bottoms were sturdier)
    >


    I've never had that happen! Not sure what I'd do, but as you said, you'd
    put the tops together and the bottoms would be the flat edges to the bottom
    of the layer cake and the top. You can always trim to make them fit flat.

    One thing I learned when I used to do cakes was to turn the cakes onto a
    baking sheet after the first half hour of cooling and freeze them while
    still a little warm. This led to very moist cakes and easier to trim the
    layers and put together. Also held back some of the crumbs to make for a
    smooth frosted cake.

    I don't think you plan to decorate the banana cake, but piping icing borders
    really cleans up any "mistakes".


  14. #14
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 5.250...
    >>

    >
    > Toweling works great, but I like the convenience of the "magic strips".
    > I've had a set for over 20 years, so they'll probably not need replacing.
    > The principle is the same, as the interior of the strip is absorbant
    > fabric
    > that you saturate with water, then squeeze out the excess.
    >
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Small-B.../dp/B0000DDXL8
    >


    Whoa! I've baked and decorated for more than 30 years and never seen those.
    I don't do so much these days but I'll have to look into those for my next
    one if I get back into it.


  15. #15
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    On Tue, 30 Mar 2010 22:31:17 -0400, "Cheryl" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected] 85.250...
    >>>

    >>
    >> Toweling works great, but I like the convenience of the "magic strips".
    >> I've had a set for over 20 years, so they'll probably not need replacing.
    >> The principle is the same, as the interior of the strip is absorbant
    >> fabric
    >> that you saturate with water, then squeeze out the excess.
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Small-B.../dp/B0000DDXL8
    >>

    >
    >Whoa! I've baked and decorated for more than 30 years and never seen those.
    >I don't do so much these days but I'll have to look into those for my next
    >one if I get back into it.


    I've tried them, they never worked for me. Guess it was just me but
    after several tries I gave up. I was into cake decorating for a while.
    Here are a couple of wedding cakes I made.
    Now remember, I'm a rank amateur and I made these for friends.

    Wedding one. The flowers are real but I made 110 leaves.
    http://i42.tinypic.com/154fyit.jpg

    Wedding two.
    http://i40.tinypic.com/ff90nk.jpg

    Side of bottom cake layer.
    http://i44.tinypic.com/293hw9i.jpg

    I'm going to hit send now before I talk myself out of embarrassing
    myself here.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw

    www.kokoscornerblog.com
    updated 03/28/10

  16. #16
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    koko wrote:

    > Now remember, I'm a rank amateur and I made these for friends.
    >
    > Wedding one. The flowers are real but I made 110 leaves.
    > http://i42.tinypic.com/154fyit.jpg
    >
    > Wedding two.
    > http://i40.tinypic.com/ff90nk.jpg
    >
    > Side of bottom cake layer.
    > http://i44.tinypic.com/293hw9i.jpg
    >
    > I'm going to hit send now before I talk myself out of embarrassing
    > myself here.


    Not at all. They're *gorgeous*.

    Serene

    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  17. #17
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    On Tue 30 Mar 2010 09:39:38p, koko told us...

    > On Tue, 30 Mar 2010 22:31:17 -0400, "Cheryl" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] 185.250...
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Toweling works great, but I like the convenience of the "magic
    >>> strips". I've had a set for over 20 years, so they'll probably not
    >>> need replacing. The principle is the same, as the interior of the
    >>> strip is absorbant fabric that you saturate with water, then squeeze
    >>> out the excess.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Small-B.../dp/B0000DDXL8
    >>>

    >>
    >>Whoa! I've baked and decorated for more than 30 years and never seen
    >>those. I don't do so much these days but I'll have to look into those
    >>for my next one if I get back into it.

    >
    > I've tried them, they never worked for me. Guess it was just me but
    > after several tries I gave up. I was into cake decorating for a while.
    > Here are a couple of wedding cakes I made.
    > Now remember, I'm a rank amateur and I made these for friends.
    >
    > Wedding one. The flowers are real but I made 110 leaves.
    > http://i42.tinypic.com/154fyit.jpg
    >
    > Wedding two.
    > http://i40.tinypic.com/ff90nk.jpg
    >
    > Side of bottom cake layer.
    > http://i44.tinypic.com/293hw9i.jpg
    >
    > I'm going to hit send now before I talk myself out of embarrassing
    > myself here.


    The cakes are beautiful, Koko. As to the magic strips, I've never had a
    failure with them.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  18. #18
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling


    "koko" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > Side of bottom cake layer.
    > http://i44.tinypic.com/293hw9i.jpg
    >
    > I'm going to hit send now before I talk myself out of embarrassing
    > myself here.
    >
    > koko


    Lovely! I once did that sort of thing and I know the work that represents.
    I was never that good.




  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    In article <[email protected]>,
    koko <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >> http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Small-B.../dp/B0000DDXL8
    > >>

    > >
    > >Whoa! I've baked and decorated for more than 30 years and never seen those.
    > >I don't do so much these days but I'll have to look into those for my next
    > >one if I get back into it.

    >
    > I've tried them, they never worked for me. Guess it was just me but
    > after several tries I gave up. I was into cake decorating for a while.
    > Here are a couple of wedding cakes I made.
    > Now remember, I'm a rank amateur and I made these for friends.
    >
    > Wedding one. The flowers are real but I made 110 leaves.
    > http://i42.tinypic.com/154fyit.jpg
    >
    > Wedding two.
    > http://i40.tinypic.com/ff90nk.jpg
    >
    > Side of bottom cake layer.
    > http://i44.tinypic.com/293hw9i.jpg
    >
    > I'm going to hit send now before I talk myself out of embarrassing
    > myself here.
    >
    > koko


    Wow Koko, those are beautiful! And I really mean that. :-)
    Were those leaves Marzipan or frosting? I've never made any real effort
    at cake decoration. It's quite an art.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "We're all adults here, except for those of us who aren't." --Blake Murphy

  20. #20
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Cake Cooling

    koko wrote:
    > Wedding one. The flowers are real but I made 110 leaves.
    > http://i42.tinypic.com/154fyit.jpg
    >
    > Wedding two.
    > http://i40.tinypic.com/ff90nk.jpg
    >
    > Side of bottom cake layer.
    > http://i44.tinypic.com/293hw9i.jpg
    >
    > I'm going to hit send now before I talk myself out of embarrassing
    > myself here.
    >
    > koko


    Your cakes are just lovely.


    Becca

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