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Thread: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

  1. #1
    phaeton Guest

    Default Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    Today I made a Sunday Pot Roast in the slow cooker. It turned out
    great, and also left a lot of liquid in the crock for gravy. Before
    making the gravy, I poured this liquid into a pan, and threw in half a
    head of cabbage all chopped up (should have done the whole head).
    Brought it to a boil, covered, reduced heat, simmered for 20. Then I
    removed the cabbage and made the gravy.

    I *love* cabbage done like this, and whenever I make a roast or corned
    beef, cabbage happens too.


    So is there a way to achieve the same or very similar result without
    cooking up a huge hunk of meat? I.e., canned beef stock, turkey bacon
    (for reduced fat) or such?

    Thanks.

    -J

  2. #2
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 11:56:17 -0700 (PDT), phaeton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Today I made a Sunday Pot Roast in the slow cooker. It turned out
    >great, and also left a lot of liquid in the crock for gravy. Before
    >making the gravy, I poured this liquid into a pan, and threw in half a
    >head of cabbage all chopped up (should have done the whole head).
    >Brought it to a boil, covered, reduced heat, simmered for 20. Then I
    >removed the cabbage and made the gravy.
    >
    >I *love* cabbage done like this, and whenever I make a roast or corned
    >beef, cabbage happens too.
    >
    >
    >So is there a way to achieve the same or very similar result without
    >cooking up a huge hunk of meat? I.e., canned beef stock, turkey bacon
    >(for reduced fat) or such?
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >-J


    Oh, yeah.

    You can sautee in bacon drippings, or go the Czech way and wilt the
    cabbage (shredded, not chopped) in dripping or lard, then adding
    beef broth and a bit of vinegar and sugar, and simmering until
    tender. It's standard fare in CZ, PO and Slovakia, and I suspect
    also Croatia.

    Alex

  3. #3
    U.N. Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    On Aug 2, 3:08*pm, Chemiker <prussianblu...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 11:56:17 -0700 (PDT), phaeton
    >
    >
    >
    > <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > >Today I made a Sunday Pot Roast in the slow cooker. *It turned out
    > >great, and also left a lot of liquid in the crock for gravy. *Before
    > >making the gravy, I poured this liquid into a pan, and threw in half a
    > >head of cabbage all chopped up (should have done the whole head).
    > >Brought it to a boil, covered, reduced heat, simmered for 20. *Then I
    > >removed the cabbage and made the gravy.

    >
    > >I *love* cabbage done like this, and whenever I make a roast or corned
    > >beef, cabbage happens too.

    >
    > >So is there a way to achieve the same or very similar result without
    > >cooking up a huge hunk of meat? *I.e., canned beef stock, turkey bacon
    > >(for reduced fat) or such?

    >
    > >Thanks.

    >
    > >-J

    >
    > Oh, yeah.
    >
    > You can sautee in bacon drippings, or go the Czech way and wilt the
    > cabbage (shredded, not chopped) in dripping or lard, then adding
    > beef broth and a bit of vinegar and sugar, and simmering until
    > tender. It's standard fare in CZ, PO and Slovakia, and I suspect
    > also Croatia.
    >
    > Alex


    Rilly? What do they call it there?

    -J

  4. #4
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 13:17:47 -0700 (PDT), "U.N."
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Aug 2, 3:08*pm, Chemiker <prussianblu...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 11:56:17 -0700 (PDT), phaeton
    >>
    >>



    >
    >Rilly? What do they call it there?


    OK, who am "they" and where be "there"?

    Alex

  5. #5
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    phaeton wrote:
    > I *love* cabbage done like this, and whenever I make a roast or corned
    > beef, cabbage happens too.
    >
    >
    > So is there a way to achieve the same or very similar result without
    > cooking up a huge hunk of meat? I.e., canned beef stock, turkey bacon
    > (for reduced fat) or such?


    We use bacon fat.


    Becca

  6. #6
    Art Kesler Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    I use low sodium chicken stock (from Trader Joe's) Tastes great.
    Works with all sorts of vegetables and vegetable combinations. You
    could use any chicken stock or beef stock or whatever. My goal is
    best flavor with lowest fat and lowest sodium possible.

    Art


    On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 11:56:17 -0700 (PDT), phaeton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Today I made a Sunday Pot Roast in the slow cooker. It turned out
    >great, and also left a lot of liquid in the crock for gravy. Before
    >making the gravy, I poured this liquid into a pan, and threw in half a
    >head of cabbage all chopped up (should have done the whole head).
    >Brought it to a boil, covered, reduced heat, simmered for 20. Then I
    >removed the cabbage and made the gravy.
    >
    >I *love* cabbage done like this, and whenever I make a roast or corned
    >beef, cabbage happens too.
    >
    >
    >So is there a way to achieve the same or very similar result without
    >cooking up a huge hunk of meat? I.e., canned beef stock, turkey bacon
    >(for reduced fat) or such?
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >-J



  7. #7
    U.N. Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    On Aug 2, 3:42*pm, Chemiker <prussianblu...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 13:17:47 -0700 (PDT), "U.N."
    >
    > <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > >On Aug 2, 3:08*pm, Chemiker <prussianblu...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > >> On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 11:56:17 -0700 (PDT), phaeton

    >
    > >Rilly? * What do they call it there?

    >
    > OK, who am "they" and where be "there"?
    >
    > Alex


    "They" would be the people of CZ, PO, and Slovakia (and Croatia by
    suspect). "There" would be the four aforementioned places.

    I agree that it was a poorly worded question, on my part.

    Thanks.

    -J

  8. #8
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    On Sun, 02 Aug 2009 16:41:13 -0500, Becca <[email protected]> wrote:

    >phaeton wrote:
    >> I *love* cabbage done like this, and whenever I make a roast or corned
    >> beef, cabbage happens too.
    >>
    >>
    >> So is there a way to achieve the same or very similar result without
    >> cooking up a huge hunk of meat? I.e., canned beef stock, turkey bacon
    >> (for reduced fat) or such?

    >
    >We use bacon fat.
    >
    >
    >Becca


    Me too.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 07/25

  9. #9
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    Art Kesler wrote:
    > I use low sodium chicken stock (from Trader Joe's) Tastes great.
    > Works with all sorts of vegetables and vegetable combinations. You
    > could use any chicken stock or beef stock or whatever. My goal is
    > best flavor with lowest fat and lowest sodium possible.
    >
    > Art
    >
    >
    > On Sun, 2 Aug 2009 11:56:17 -0700 (PDT), phaeton
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Today I made a Sunday Pot Roast in the slow cooker. It turned out
    >> great, and also left a lot of liquid in the crock for gravy. Before
    >> making the gravy, I poured this liquid into a pan, and threw in half a
    >> head of cabbage all chopped up (should have done the whole head).
    >> Brought it to a boil, covered, reduced heat, simmered for 20. Then I
    >> removed the cabbage and made the gravy.
    >>
    >> I *love* cabbage done like this, and whenever I make a roast or corned
    >> beef, cabbage happens too.
    >>
    >>
    >> So is there a way to achieve the same or very similar result without
    >> cooking up a huge hunk of meat? I.e., canned beef stock, turkey bacon
    >> (for reduced fat) or such?
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> -J

    >


    I use cabbage in vegetable soup whenever I remember to grab some at the
    store when grabbing stuff to make the soup. If It's a beef based soup,
    I'll often sear the beef in strips or chunks first, and use the
    drippings in the soup while the vegetables (including the cabbage) cook,
    I keep the meat itself separate (and rare) until time to serve. The hot
    soup will finish off the meat to medium rare in the bowl, but will still
    be tender.

    If with chicken, I simmer the chicken in broth until cooked. pull the
    chicken to chuck or shred, de-fat and season the broth, add the veggies,
    then when tender, add the chicken back in.

    If not using meat, I saute the cabbage and other veggies you would
    normally in bacon fat I keep a jar in the fridge for this purpose, and
    for fried eggs. Then add the noodles (normally the no yolk egg noodles)
    when veggies are close to tender in the broth.

    There's not much fat in any of the soup versions, and only the amount of
    sodium that you want in it.

    Regards,

    Bob


  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    phaeton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Today I made a Sunday Pot Roast in the slow cooker. It turned out
    > great, and also left a lot of liquid in the crock for gravy. Before
    > making the gravy, I poured this liquid into a pan, and threw in half a
    > head of cabbage all chopped up (should have done the whole head).
    > Brought it to a boil, covered, reduced heat, simmered for 20. Then I
    > removed the cabbage and made the gravy.
    >
    > I *love* cabbage done like this, and whenever I make a roast or corned
    > beef, cabbage happens too.
    >
    >
    > So is there a way to achieve the same or very similar result without
    > cooking up a huge hunk of meat? I.e., canned beef stock, turkey bacon
    > (for reduced fat) or such?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -J


    Home made stock? :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    In article <[email protected]>,
    koko <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 02 Aug 2009 16:41:13 -0500, Becca <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >phaeton wrote:
    > >> I *love* cabbage done like this, and whenever I make a roast or corned
    > >> beef, cabbage happens too.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> So is there a way to achieve the same or very similar result without
    > >> cooking up a huge hunk of meat? I.e., canned beef stock, turkey bacon
    > >> (for reduced fat) or such?

    > >
    > >We use bacon fat.
    > >
    > >
    > >Becca

    >
    > Me too.
    >
    > koko


    Sometimes I just quarter it and steam it, and treat with a little
    grapseed oil (or butter), lemon pepper and dill weed.

    My favorite way to serve it tho' is stuffed. ;-d

    Y'all have, however, just given me an idea for dinner (I've been asleep
    all afternoon). Some steamed cabbage, sliced and mixed together with
    some of that leftover roast pork loin and tomato sauce that's in the
    'frige. I can slice the pork loin thinly, heat it up and mix it in with
    sliced steamed cabbage.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    In article <h555jq$bcn$[email protected]>,
    Bob Muncie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I use cabbage in vegetable soup whenever I remember to grab some at the
    > store when grabbing stuff to make the soup. If It's a beef based soup,
    > I'll often sear the beef in strips or chunks first, and use the
    > drippings in the soup while the vegetables (including the cabbage) cook,
    > I keep the meat itself separate (and rare) until time to serve. The hot
    > soup will finish off the meat to medium rare in the bowl, but will still
    > be tender.


    This sounds really good!

    Do you ever use lean pork for soup? I never have, but I do often use it
    in stir fry's or rice dishes.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  13. #13
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article <h555jq$bcn$[email protected]>,
    > Bob Muncie <bob.muncie@[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I use cabbage in vegetable soup whenever I remember to grab some at the
    >> store when grabbing stuff to make the soup. If It's a beef based soup,
    >> I'll often sear the beef in strips or chunks first, and use the
    >> drippings in the soup while the vegetables (including the cabbage) cook,
    >> I keep the meat itself separate (and rare) until time to serve. The hot
    >> soup will finish off the meat to medium rare in the bowl, but will still
    >> be tender.

    >
    > This sounds really good!
    >
    > Do you ever use lean pork for soup? I never have, but I do often use it
    > in stir fry's or rice dishes.


    Om - I have never really liked pork in soup that is vegetable based
    (lean or Otherwise) that much, although once in a while I'll fry up
    pork like hot Italian sausage de-skinned and browned and broken up like
    burger and have that in a vegetable soup, and that does go well with the
    cabbage, but the drippings are mostly fat, and I wouldn't use them for
    the soup. I like bacon, hocks, neck bone, or meaty ham bones in cream or
    bean based soups though. And in those I like the meat smoked.

    Bob

  14. #14
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Cabbage simmered in pan drippings

    In article <h55hvj$p72$[email protected]>,
    Bob Muncie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > > In article <h555jq$bcn$[email protected]>,
    > > Bob Muncie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I use cabbage in vegetable soup whenever I remember to grab some at the
    > >> store when grabbing stuff to make the soup. If It's a beef based soup,
    > >> I'll often sear the beef in strips or chunks first, and use the
    > >> drippings in the soup while the vegetables (including the cabbage) cook,
    > >> I keep the meat itself separate (and rare) until time to serve. The hot
    > >> soup will finish off the meat to medium rare in the bowl, but will still
    > >> be tender.

    > >
    > > This sounds really good!
    > >
    > > Do you ever use lean pork for soup? I never have, but I do often use it
    > > in stir fry's or rice dishes.

    >
    > Om - I have never really liked pork in soup that is vegetable based
    > (lean or Otherwise) that much, although once in a while I'll fry up
    > pork like hot Italian sausage de-skinned and browned and broken up like
    > burger and have that in a vegetable soup, and that does go well with the
    > cabbage, but the drippings are mostly fat, and I wouldn't use them for
    > the soup. I like bacon, hocks, neck bone, or meaty ham bones in cream or
    > bean based soups though. And in those I like the meat smoked.
    >
    > Bob


    Thanks.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

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