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Thread: butter keepers

  1. #1
    Charlene Charette Guest

    Default butter keepers

    I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and was
    wondering if there is much difference between brands or are they all
    basically the same?

    --Charlene


    --
    America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose
    our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves. -- Abraham Lincoln


    email perronnellec at earthlink . net

  2. #2
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    In article <[email protected]> ,
    Charlene Charette <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and was
    > wondering if there is much difference between brands or are they all
    > basically the same?
    >
    > --Charlene


    I just have an old silver plated one that's an heirloom with a glass
    insert. To me, the only reason for a butter keeper is to keep it clean
    at room temp, and to keep the cats out of it. <g>
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive." -- Dalai Lama

  3. #3
    Van Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers


    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    To me, the only reason for a butter keeper is to keep it clean
    > at room temp, and to keep the cats out of it. <g>
    > --


    Nothin' like goin' to butter your toast and seeing those claw marks, huh?

    Van


    ---- Posted via Pronews.com - Premium Corporate Usenet News Provider ----
    http://www.pronews.com offers corporate packages that have access to 100,000+ newsgroups

  4. #4
    Ted Campanelli Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not
    so great) words of knowledge:
    > I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and was
    > wondering if there is much difference between brands or are they all
    > basically the same?
    >
    > --Charlene
    >
    >


    They are pretty much all the same.

  5. #5
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    Ted Campanelli wrote:
    > Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not
    > so great) words of knowledge:
    >> I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and was
    >> wondering if there is much difference between brands or are they all
    >> basically the same?
    >>
    >> --Charlene
    >>
    >>

    >
    > They are pretty much all the same.


    I just want to make sure we're using the same terms to describe the same
    item?
    Butter keepers are those upside down cups that hold the inverted butter
    over a small amount of water, right? They are kept outside of the
    refrigerator so that the butter can remain soft.You have to replace the
    water every once in a while.
    Butter dishes, on the other hand, are (usually covered) dishes that hold
    a portion of butter and either go in the fridge between uses or remain
    on the counter if you desire.

  6. #6
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    Goomba wrote:
    > Ted Campanelli wrote:
    >> Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes
    >> not so great) words of knowledge:
    >>> I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and
    >>> was wondering if there is much difference between brands or are
    >>> they all basically the same?
    >>>
    >>> --Charlene
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> They are pretty much all the same.

    >
    > I just want to make sure we're using the same terms to describe the
    > same item?
    > Butter keepers are those upside down cups that hold the inverted
    > butter over a small amount of water, right?


    Butter bells, yes.

    > They are kept outside of
    > the refrigerator so that the butter can remain soft.You have to
    > replace the water every once in a while.


    The water should be changed every week and the water should be cold but not
    icy. I love my butter bell

    Jill


  7. #7
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Ted Campanelli wrote:
    >>> Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes
    >>> not so great) words of knowledge:
    >>>> I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and
    >>>> was wondering if there is much difference between brands or are
    >>>> they all basically the same?
    >>>>
    >>>> --Charlene
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> They are pretty much all the same.

    >>
    >> I just want to make sure we're using the same terms to describe the
    >> same item?
    >> Butter keepers are those upside down cups that hold the inverted
    >> butter over a small amount of water, right?

    >
    > Why does a butter keeper need water in it?
    > Butter does not dry out.


    Butter BELLS are small crocks that have cold water in a cup around the
    central butter container to keep unrefrigerated butter from going rancid.
    They're designed to keep butter for up to 30 days sitting out on the
    counter. The idea is soft, spreadable butter that doesn't spoil. You keep
    it cool with water, it doesn't spoil.

    Jill


  8. #8
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    Omelet wrote:

    > Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> I just want to make sure we're using the same terms to describe the
    >> same item?
    >> Butter keepers are those upside down cups that hold the inverted
    >> butter over a small amount of water, right? They are kept outside of
    >> the refrigerator so that the butter can remain soft.You have to
    >> replace the water every once in a while.


    > Why does a butter keeper need water in it?
    > Butter does not dry out.


    A butter bell has water in it to keep out air. The water does
    not touch the butter.

    nancy

  9. #9
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    On Oct 30, 8:20�am, Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Ted Campanelli wrote:
    > > Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not
    > > so great) words of knowledge:
    > >> I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and was
    > >> wondering if there is much difference between brands or are they all
    > >> basically the same?

    >
    > >> --Charlene

    >
    > > They are pretty much all the same.

    >
    > I just want to make sure we're using the same terms to describe the same
    > item?
    > Butter keepers are those upside down cups that hold the inverted butter
    > over a small amount of water, right? They are kept outside of the
    > refrigerator so that the butter can remain soft.You have to replace the
    > water every once in a while.
    > Butter dishes, on the other hand, are (usually covered) dishes that hold
    > a portion of butter and either go in the fridge between uses or remain
    > on the counter if you desire.


    Correct.

  10. #10
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    On Oct 30, 10:11�am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In article <6mtn4dFinc2...@mid.individual.net>,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > �Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > > Ted Campanelli wrote:
    > > > Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not
    > > > so great) words of knowledge:
    > > >> I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and was
    > > >> wondering if there is much difference between brands or are they all
    > > >> basically the same?

    >
    > > >> --Charlene

    >
    > > > They are pretty much all the same.

    >
    > > I just want to make sure we're using the same terms to describe the same
    > > item?
    > > Butter keepers are those upside down cups that hold the inverted butter
    > > over a small amount of water, right? They are kept outside of the
    > > refrigerator so that the butter can remain soft.You have to replace the
    > > water every once in a while.
    > > Butter dishes, on the other hand, are (usually covered) dishes that hold
    > > a portion of butter and either go in the fridge between uses or remain
    > > on the counter if you desire.

    >
    > Why does a butter keeper need water in it?
    > Butter does not dry out.



    The water acts as a barrier; keeps bugs, dust, and odors out, also
    helps prevent oxidation... and butter consisting of approximately
    10pct water it does indeed dry out.

  11. #11
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Butter BELLS are small crocks that have cold water in a cup around
    >> the central butter container to keep unrefrigerated butter from
    >> going rancid. They're designed to keep butter for up to 30 days
    >> sitting out on the counter. The idea is soft, spreadable butter
    >> that doesn't spoil. You keep it cool with water, it doesn't spoil.
    >>

    >
    > Hm, okay. I just use that covered silver butter dish and I've never
    > had butter go rancid. A cube usually only lasts two to three weeks.
    > I tend to cook with it and keep it by the stove.


    I don't use that much butter so keeping it unrefrigerated is problematic.
    But when you want to spread it on bread and it's hard as a rock, yikes!

    Here's a link:

    http://www.lehmans.com/shopping/prod...rd=butter+bell

    or the tiny one:

    http://tinyurl.com/ydcvcr

    Jill


  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ted Campanelli wrote:
    > > Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not
    > > so great) words of knowledge:
    > >> I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and was
    > >> wondering if there is much difference between brands or are they all
    > >> basically the same?
    > >>
    > >> --Charlene
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > > They are pretty much all the same.

    >
    > I just want to make sure we're using the same terms to describe the same
    > item?
    > Butter keepers are those upside down cups that hold the inverted butter
    > over a small amount of water, right? They are kept outside of the
    > refrigerator so that the butter can remain soft.You have to replace the
    > water every once in a while.
    > Butter dishes, on the other hand, are (usually covered) dishes that hold
    > a portion of butter and either go in the fridge between uses or remain
    > on the counter if you desire.


    Why does a butter keeper need water in it?
    Butter does not dry out.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive." -- Dalai Lama

  13. #13
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The water should be changed every week and the water should be cold but not
    > icy. I love my butter bell
    >
    > Jill


    I must have hinky water I was developing mold on the rim. ICK!

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/kilikini
    (Send her a note!)

  14. #14
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I don't use that much butter so keeping it unrefrigerated is problematic.
    > But when you want to spread it on bread and it's hard as a rock, yikes!


    > Jill


    I have a small round dish (3" diameter?) and I keep about 1-2 tbsp of
    butter in it, unrefrigerated, for spreading. If it's been out for a few
    days and I need butter for frying, I'll use it and replace it with
    another tablespoon-size pat from the fridge. Lather, rinse, repeat.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/kilikini
    (Send her a note!)

  15. #15
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    "jmcquown" wrote:
    > Omelet wrote:
    > > I tend to cook with it and keep it by the stove.


    Why by the stove... I mostly use butter for cooking too but I keep it
    in a covered glass butter dish in the fridge... butter doesn't need to
    be soft for cooking... your knives can't be that dull and your wrists
    that limp.

    > I don't use that much butter so keeping it unrefrigerated is problematic.
    > But when you want to spread it on bread and it's hard as a rock, yikes!


    I add butter to already hot food, (veggies, baked/mashed potato, hot
    cereal, waffles/pancakes, etc) so it quickly melts... the only times I
    spread butter is on toast and warm crusty bread... slice a few thin
    pats onto each slice, by the time I'm ready to spread it the butter is
    soft. I don't ever remember spreading butter on soft bread... the
    thought of butter slathered on untoasted wonder white and its ilk is
    gack. I think the only time I want soft butter is for spreading on
    matzo, but that's rare and on those few occasions 20 seconds per stick
    on low in the nuker does the trick. This was one of those odd
    mornings that I felt like breakfast (I very rarely eat breakfast),
    decided to fry eggs, hacked off a thick pat of cold butter with the
    spatuala and plopped it into the heated pan, by the time I put the
    butter back in the fridge and got the eggs from the fridge the butter
    was melted... four perfectly cooked over easys open faced on two
    slices of rye toast. I just can't come up with any reason why I'd
    need to regularly keep butter at room temperature.


  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Ted Campanelli wrote:
    > >>> Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes
    > >>> not so great) words of knowledge:
    > >>>> I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and
    > >>>> was wondering if there is much difference between brands or are
    > >>>> they all basically the same?
    > >>>>
    > >>>> --Charlene
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>
    > >>> They are pretty much all the same.
    > >>
    > >> I just want to make sure we're using the same terms to describe the
    > >> same item?
    > >> Butter keepers are those upside down cups that hold the inverted
    > >> butter over a small amount of water, right?

    > >
    > > Why does a butter keeper need water in it?
    > > Butter does not dry out.

    >
    > Butter BELLS are small crocks that have cold water in a cup around the
    > central butter container to keep unrefrigerated butter from going rancid.
    > They're designed to keep butter for up to 30 days sitting out on the
    > counter. The idea is soft, spreadable butter that doesn't spoil. You keep
    > it cool with water, it doesn't spoil.
    >
    > Jill


    Hm, okay. I just use that covered silver butter dish and I've never had
    butter go rancid. A cube usually only lasts two to three weeks. I tend
    to cook with it and keep it by the stove.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive." -- Dalai Lama

  17. #17
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > "jmcquown" wrote:
    > > The water should be changed every week.

    >
    > I must have hinky water I was developing mold on the rim. *ICK!


    I didn't know Kohler made butter bells... LOL



  18. #18
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    Sheldon wrote:
    > "jmcquown" wrote:
    >> I don't use that much butter so keeping it unrefrigerated is
    >> problematic. But when you want to spread it on bread and it's hard
    >> as a rock, yikes!

    >
    > I add butter to already hot food, (veggies, baked/mashed potato, hot
    > cereal, waffles/pancakes, etc) so it quickly melts... the only times I
    > spread butter is on toast and warm crusty bread... slice a few thin
    > pats onto each slice, by the time I'm ready to spread it the butter is
    > soft. I don't ever remember spreading butter on soft bread... the
    > thought of butter slathered on untoasted wonder white and its ilk is
    > gack.


    Who said a word about untoasted Wonder white bread? Wasn't me.
    Refrigerated cold butter doesn't spread well on whole wheat *toast*, which,
    by the way, my mother was eating nearly every day. I like my butter bell.
    Sue me.

    Jill


  19. #19
    Lass Chance_2 Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    Since I keep my thermostat at 63 degrees in the winter, my only problem
    is spreading ROOM TEMP butter, not "keeping it".

    LassChance


  20. #20
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: butter keepers

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Oct 30, 10:11?am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > In article <6mtn4dFinc2...@mid.individual.net>,
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > ?Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > > > Ted Campanelli wrote:
    > > > > Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not
    > > > > so great) words of knowledge:
    > > > >> I've been looking at butter keepers (such as the butter bell) and was
    > > > >> wondering if there is much difference between brands or are they all
    > > > >> basically the same?

    > >
    > > > >> --Charlene

    > >
    > > > > They are pretty much all the same.

    > >
    > > > I just want to make sure we're using the same terms to describe the same
    > > > item?
    > > > Butter keepers are those upside down cups that hold the inverted butter
    > > > over a small amount of water, right? They are kept outside of the
    > > > refrigerator so that the butter can remain soft.You have to replace the
    > > > water every once in a while.
    > > > Butter dishes, on the other hand, are (usually covered) dishes that hold
    > > > a portion of butter and either go in the fridge between uses or remain
    > > > on the counter if you desire.

    > >
    > > Why does a butter keeper need water in it?
    > > Butter does not dry out.

    >
    >
    > The water acts as a barrier; keeps bugs, dust, and odors out, also
    > helps prevent oxidation... and butter consisting of approximately
    > 10pct water it does indeed dry out.


    Ok, but my covered butter dish seems to prevent that. Silver is
    anit-bacterial.

    I just don't see the point in adding water, that can get contaminated
    even faster if it's exposed to the outside air.

    It's like, ew.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive." -- Dalai Lama

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