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Thread: Broiled flounder mush question

  1. #1
    James Egan Guest

    Default Broiled flounder mush question

    I took 3 individually frozen flounder fillets, and thawed them out for
    over a day. I then dried them with a paper towel, sprayed them with some
    butter spray, added some spices, and broiled them on high about 4 inches
    from the upper heating element. After about 6 minutes I took a fork to
    check for flakiness, and found that they were mush. I noticed there was
    a good amount of liquid surrounding the fillets. I wasn't sure if I over
    cooked them or under cooked them, so I let them go for about 3 more
    minutes, and still mush. They weren't edible at all. So, I'm thinking that
    maybe I should broil flounder maybe 15 inches from the heating element on
    low? Or was the "mushiness" caused by the fact they were frozen and "soggy"?


    -Thanks


  2. #2
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Broiled flounder mush question


    "James Egan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ..
    >I took 3 individually frozen flounder fillets, and thawed them out for
    > over a day. I then dried them with a paper towel, sprayed them with some
    > butter spray, added some spices, and broiled them on high about 4 inches
    > from the upper heating element. After about 6 minutes I took a fork to
    > check for flakiness, and found that they were mush. I noticed there was
    > a good amount of liquid surrounding the fillets. I wasn't sure if I over
    > cooked them or under cooked them, so I let them go for about 3 more
    > minutes, and still mush. They weren't edible at all. So, I'm thinking that
    > maybe I should broil flounder maybe 15 inches from the heating element on
    > low? Or was the "mushiness" caused by the fact they were frozen and
    > "soggy"?
    >


    This has happened to me before with frozen fish, don't think it was
    flounder,
    though. I think I would let the filets sit on paper towels for a while next
    timem
    and then brush them with butter and broil on a rack or slotted broiler pan
    so
    they are not sitting in liquid while they cook.


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  3. #3
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Broiled flounder mush question


    "James Egan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ..
    >I took 3 individually frozen flounder fillets, and thawed them out for
    > over a day. I then dried them with a paper towel, sprayed them with some
    > butter spray, added some spices, and broiled them on high about 4 inches
    > from the upper heating element. After about 6 minutes I took a fork to
    > check for flakiness, and found that they were mush. I noticed there was
    > a good amount of liquid surrounding the fillets. I wasn't sure if I over
    > cooked them or under cooked them, so I let them go for about 3 more
    > minutes, and still mush. They weren't edible at all. So, I'm thinking that
    > maybe I should broil flounder maybe 15 inches from the heating element on
    > low? Or was the "mushiness" caused by the fact they were frozen and
    > "soggy"?



    It is so common. They package the fish after using a vacuum system that
    makes the meat draw in a lot of water. Then when it was frozen the ice
    destroyed the meat's connective tissue. Sometimes these things get
    partially thawed and refrozen which makes for a terrible texture.

    Buy fresh if possible. I have been seriously disenchanted with frozen
    seafood. The last straw was some expensive frozen scallops that were more
    than 50% weight in water and the scallops were a total loss.

    Paul



  4. #4
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Broiled flounder mush question

    James Egan wrote:

    > I took 3 individually frozen flounder fillets, and thawed them out for
    > over a day. I then dried them with a paper towel, sprayed them with some
    > butter spray, added some spices, and broiled them on high about 4 inches
    > from the upper heating element. After about 6 minutes I took a fork to
    > check for flakiness, and found that they were mush. I noticed there was
    > a good amount of liquid surrounding the fillets. I wasn't sure if I over
    > cooked them or under cooked them, so I let them go for about 3 more
    > minutes, and still mush. They weren't edible at all. So, I'm thinking that
    > maybe I should broil flounder maybe 15 inches from the heating element on
    > low? Or was the "mushiness" caused by the fact they were frozen and "soggy"?


    Dunno. I remember my mom fixing flounder filets that were delicious.
    But the last time I bought purportedly fresh filets (in Mexico) they
    went to mush when I tried to grill them. And the past couple of times
    I've purchased frozen "flounder" it was pretty gross.


  5. #5
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Broiled flounder mush question


    "Paul M. Cook" wrote:
    >
    > "James Egan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] ..
    > >I took 3 individually frozen flounder fillets, and thawed them out for
    > > over a day. I then dried them with a paper towel, sprayed them with some
    > > butter spray, added some spices, and broiled them on high about 4 inches
    > > from the upper heating element. After about 6 minutes I took a fork to
    > > check for flakiness, and found that they were mush. I noticed there was
    > > a good amount of liquid surrounding the fillets. I wasn't sure if I over
    > > cooked them or under cooked them, so I let them go for about 3 more
    > > minutes, and still mush. They weren't edible at all. So, I'm thinking that
    > > maybe I should broil flounder maybe 15 inches from the heating element on
    > > low? Or was the "mushiness" caused by the fact they were frozen and
    > > "soggy"?

    >
    > It is so common. They package the fish after using a vacuum system that
    > makes the meat draw in a lot of water. Then when it was frozen the ice
    > destroyed the meat's connective tissue. Sometimes these things get
    > partially thawed and refrozen which makes for a terrible texture.
    >
    > Buy fresh if possible. I have been seriously disenchanted with frozen
    > seafood. The last straw was some expensive frozen scallops that were more
    > than 50% weight in water and the scallops were a total loss.
    >
    > Paul


    I think the real problem is mishandling in transit where the item thaws
    and refreezes. The fish processed and flash frozen on the factory ships
    is generally very good as long as it's kept properly frozen until it's
    used.

  6. #6
    Puester Guest

    Default Re: Broiled flounder mush question

    James Egan wrote:
    > I took 3 individually frozen flounder fillets, and thawed them out for
    > over a day. I then dried them with a paper towel, sprayed them with some
    > butter spray, added some spices, and broiled them on high about 4 inches
    > from the upper heating element. After about 6 minutes I took a fork to
    > check for flakiness, and found that they were mush. I noticed there was
    > a good amount of liquid surrounding the fillets. I wasn't sure if I over
    > cooked them or under cooked them, so I let them go for about 3 more
    > minutes, and still mush. They weren't edible at all. So, I'm thinking that
    > maybe I should broil flounder maybe 15 inches from the heating element on
    > low? Or was the "mushiness" caused by the fact they were frozen and "soggy"?
    >
    >



    I think the latter.
    I also believe that somewhere along the line they were
    thawed and refrozen at least once.

    gloria p

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