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Thread: Brining meats

  1. #1
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Brining meats

    Wife was shopping at our fave package store and
    ran into a fellow who was a chef, trained in Europe.
    She mentioned how she enjoyed certain meat
    dishes (in Europe) and he told her it was prob.
    because they brined the meat first, and later
    reincorporated some of the brine into the sauces.

    He also said that brining is not as well known
    here in the US, but I know some BBQ-types
    use it.

    ANybody have any experience on brining
    meats before cooking?

    Chemiker, who's never used it.

  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    Chemiker <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Wife was shopping at our fave package store and
    >ran into a fellow who was a chef, trained in Europe.
    >She mentioned how she enjoyed certain meat
    >dishes (in Europe) and he told her it was prob.
    >because they brined the meat first, and later
    >reincorporated some of the brine into the sauces.


    >He also said that brining is not as well known
    >here in the US, but I know some BBQ-types
    >use it.


    >ANybody have any experience on brining
    >meats before cooking?


    For sure. I fairly routinely brine pork chops (the
    free-range sort). I do not return brining liquid to the
    dish though, that is a bit gross plus it is too salty.

    Googling might reveal a prior post from me with the
    exact procedure for doing this.

    Steve

  3. #3
    =?iso-2022-kr?q?=1B=24=29C=0E=22=3E=0F_Horry_=0E=22=3E=0F?= Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 10:06:31 -0600, Chemiker wrote:

    > Wife was shopping at our fave package store and ran into a fellow who
    > was a chef, trained in Europe. She mentioned how she enjoyed certain
    > meat dishes (in Europe) and he told her it was prob. because they brined
    > the meat first, and later reincorporated some of the brine into the
    > sauces.
    >
    > He also said that brining is not as well known here in the US, but I
    > know some BBQ-types use it.
    >
    > ANybody have any experience on brining meats before cooking?
    >
    > Chemiker, who's never used it.


    Nor have I. But here's a short instructional video by a French(-
    sounding) woman showing how to brine a turkey.

    http://video.about.com/bbq/How-to-Brine-Turkey.htm

    I didn't realize it would take that long.

  4. #4
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    Chemiker wrote:

    > Wife was shopping at our fave package store and
    > ran into a fellow who was a chef, trained in Europe.
    > She mentioned how she enjoyed certain meat
    > dishes (in Europe) and he told her it was prob.
    > because they brined the meat first, and later
    > reincorporated some of the brine into the sauces.
    >
    > He also said that brining is not as well known
    > here in the US, but I know some BBQ-types
    > use it.
    >
    > ANybody have any experience on brining
    > meats before cooking?
    >
    > Chemiker, who's never used it.


    I brine bone-in chicken parts before grilling. It adds moisture and
    allows you to get seasoning all the way down to the bone.


  5. #5
    Harry Buskin Guest

    Default The Other Dark Meat, WAS Re: Brining meats

    Catch this article:

    http://www.mcclatchydc.com/251/story/59566.html

    The other dark meat is racoon, brined.

    HAB



  6. #6
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    Chemiker <[email protected]> wrote:

    > He also said that brining is not as well known
    > here in the US, but I know some BBQ-types
    > use it.


    It seems to be gaining a certain amount of trendy
    status lately. I've brined hams, pork chops, and
    chicken within recent weeks. Wet cure for ham and
    bacon (which I've done for several years) is
    essentially brining.

    > ANybody have any experience on brining
    > meats before cooking?


    It worked well for some pork chops I made last
    week. Put "brining meat" into your favorite
    search engine and you'll get hundreds of links.
    I posted a link here recently in a thread about
    dry breasts.

    Bill Ranck
    Blacksburg, Va.

  7. #7
    Harry Buskin Guest

    Default The Other Dark Meat, WAS Re: Brining meats

    Catch this article:

    http://www.mcclatchydc.com/251/story/59566.html

    The other dark meat is racoon, brined.

    HAB




  8. #8
    Chris Marksberry Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats


    > Wife was shopping at our fave package store and
    > ran into a fellow who was a chef, trained in Europe.
    > She mentioned how she enjoyed certain meat
    > dishes (in Europe) and he told her it was prob.
    > because they brined the meat first, and later
    > reincorporated some of the brine into the sauces.
    >
    > He also said that brining is not as well known
    > here in the US, but I know some BBQ-types
    > use it.
    >
    > ANybody have any experience on brining
    > meats before cooking?
    >
    > Chemiker, who's never used it.


    Here's a method from Pastorio... I know he tweaked it many times.


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Basic Meat Brine

    Recipe By :Bob Pastorio
    Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Marinade

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 Quart water
    4 tablespoons sugar
    3 Tablespoons kosher salt
    1 tablespoon black pepper
    1 teaspoon thyme
    2 teaspoons oregano
    4 bay leaves -- crumbled
    4 cloves garlic -- smashed
    2 tablespoons vinegar


    This much brine will take care of a 3 or 4 pound piece of pork loin,
    a
    chicken (or chicken pieces), a 3 or 4 pound beef, lamb or veal roast.
    How long to leave the meats in the brine? Depends. For poultry, at
    least 24 hours. Up to about 36 hours. Roasts benefit from 3 days or more.

    Heat the water and add the remaining ingredients. Bring to a low
    simmer, stir a few times and remove from the heat. Let cool.
    That's the brine. How to use it? One very easy way is a gallon
    freezer bag. Put the meat in the bag and pour the cooled brine over
    it. Squeeze out much of the air, put the bag in a container and
    refrigerate. Just in case of leaks.
    Source:
    "Food Wine List"




  9. #9
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    Chris Marksberry said...

    >
    > Here's a method from Pastorio... I know he tweaked it many times.
    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Basic Meat Brine
    >
    > Recipe By :Bob Pastorio


    <snipped for brevity>


    Oooh! Another Pastorio gem!

    Thanks. Now I'll have to try brining something.

    Is brining the finishing touch before cooking or do you season after
    brining as well?

    Andy
    [RIP Pastorio]

  10. #10
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    Chris Marksberry <[email protected]> wrote:

    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Basic Meat Brine
    >
    >Recipe By :Bob Pastorio
    >Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    >Categories : Marinade
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    >-------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 1 Quart water
    > 4 tablespoons sugar
    > 3 Tablespoons kosher salt
    > 1 tablespoon black pepper
    > 1 teaspoon thyme
    > 2 teaspoons oregano
    > 4 bay leaves -- crumbled
    > 4 cloves garlic -- smashed
    > 2 tablespoons vinegar


    I would say this is not a brine, it is a marinade. There is not
    enough salt in it to be a brine, plus there is vinegar -- brines
    are not acidic.

    Spices are optional in a brine and sugar is not normally included.
    These ingredients are more typical in marinades.

    A basic brine is water and salt in a 12:1 ratio by volume.
    I've seen recipes calling for 8:1 but I have not found that
    level of salt necessary. I've seen 16:1 used in a recipe from Acme
    chop house, San Francisco. The above recipe is about 21:1.
    I would say the salt concentation is too low for brining action.

    Steve

  11. #11
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Is brining the finishing touch before cooking or do you season after
    >brining as well?


    In my experience, brining is the initial phase. I start
    about 6 hours before I need to cook the meat and brine for
    4 hours. I then rinse it and rinse it, then set it aside
    at room temp for the remaining time before cooking. At
    that point, after rinsing, I will add some black pepper.
    This would be the time to add more seasoning -- if your
    meat requires it.

    Brining is used to help tenderize a tough, but flavorful
    piece of meat. It's not a flavoring technique, at least
    in its basic form.

    A classic brined pork chop does not have all this seasoning
    and spices added to the brine. Brined fish, however, normally
    includes some spices -- usually in the cardamom/nutmeg/allspice
    direction.

    Steve

  12. #12
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    Steve Pope said...

    > Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Is brining the finishing touch before cooking or do you season after
    >>brining as well?

    >
    > In my experience, brining is the initial phase. I start
    > about 6 hours before I need to cook the meat and brine for
    > 4 hours. I then rinse it and rinse it, then set it aside
    > at room temp for the remaining time before cooking. At
    > that point, after rinsing, I will add some black pepper.
    > This would be the time to add more seasoning -- if your
    > meat requires it.
    >
    > Brining is used to help tenderize a tough, but flavorful
    > piece of meat. It's not a flavoring technique, at least
    > in its basic form.
    >
    > A classic brined pork chop does not have all this seasoning
    > and spices added to the brine. Brined fish, however, normally
    > includes some spices -- usually in the cardamom/nutmeg/allspice
    > direction.
    >
    > Steve



    Steve,

    Thanks for explaining!

    Best,

    Andy

  13. #13
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    Looks good. I think I'll try it. Maybe on flank
    steak. I would think this would also work in
    a vacuum marinator. I've got one of those
    vacuum FoodSavers with a square vessel
    that looks like a 8X8 casserole dish. I use
    it and the larger jar canisters for marinating
    jerky, and it really speeds up the process..

    Chemiker

    On Wed, 14 Jan 2009 10:46:55 -0600, "Chris Marksberry"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Here's a method from Pastorio... I know he tweaked it many times.
    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Basic Meat Brine
    >
    >Recipe By :Bob Pastorio
    >Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    >Categories : Marinade
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    >-------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 1 Quart water
    > 4 tablespoons sugar
    > 3 Tablespoons kosher salt
    > 1 tablespoon black pepper
    > 1 teaspoon thyme
    > 2 teaspoons oregano
    > 4 bay leaves -- crumbled
    > 4 cloves garlic -- smashed
    > 2 tablespoons vinegar
    >
    >
    > This much brine will take care of a 3 or 4 pound piece of pork loin,
    >a
    >chicken (or chicken pieces), a 3 or 4 pound beef, lamb or veal roast.
    >How long to leave the meats in the brine? Depends. For poultry, at
    >least 24 hours. Up to about 36 hours. Roasts benefit from 3 days or more.
    >
    >Heat the water and add the remaining ingredients. Bring to a low
    >simmer, stir a few times and remove from the heat. Let cool.
    > That's the brine. How to use it? One very easy way is a gallon
    >freezer bag. Put the meat in the bag and pour the cooled brine over
    >it. Squeeze out much of the air, put the bag in a container and
    >refrigerate. Just in case of leaks.
    > Source:
    > "Food Wine List"
    >
    >


  14. #14
    Lass Chance_2 Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    I brined last Thanksgiving for the first time. When I checked the
    turkey's temperature, I THOUGHT the digital numbers said 117 degrees, so
    back into the oven the bird went.

    Half an hour later, I checked again---onlyTHIS time my friend also
    looked at the digital numbers. "Still 117!" I said. "No,", he replied,
    that says 177".

    So, due to my loiusy vision and the weird way digital numbers look, the
    poor bird was overcooked by damn near an hour. However, it tasted
    sublime---very juicy, tender, no dryness in the breast, even...not at
    all ruined as I feared it would be. Im SURE the brining is what saved
    it. Imagine how DRY a turkey would be THAT overcoked, without the
    miracle of extra moisture!

    Lass


  15. #15
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats


    "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Brining is used to help tenderize a tough, but flavorful
    > piece of meat. It's not a flavoring technique, at least
    > in its basic form.


    I've never heard that. It does add moisture through osmosis and adding
    moisture may make what would otherwise have been a dried out chicken breast
    or pork chop seem more tender. I've brined many a corned beef and until
    properly cooked like any other brisket, it is still tough.



  16. #16
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    >> Brining is used to help tenderize a tough, but flavorful
    >> piece of meat. It's not a flavoring technique, at least
    >> in its basic form.


    >I've never heard that. It does add moisture through osmosis and adding
    >moisture may make what would otherwise have been a dried out chicken breast
    >or pork chop seem more tender. I've brined many a corned beef and until
    >properly cooked like any other brisket, it is still tough.


    Okay, thanks for this datapoint. So your thinking is it
    will make like a pork chop seem more tender, because it
    makes it moister, but it doesn't really tenderize the connective
    tissue in any real way?

    I'll believe this however the results can be pretty good,
    in terms of faux-tenderizing.

    Steve

  17. #17
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    In article <7tobl.25686$Jy.20611@newsfe06.[email protected]>,
    Kathleen <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Chemiker wrote:
    >
    > > Wife was shopping at our fave package store and
    > > ran into a fellow who was a chef, trained in Europe.
    > > She mentioned how she enjoyed certain meat
    > > dishes (in Europe) and he told her it was prob.
    > > because they brined the meat first, and later
    > > reincorporated some of the brine into the sauces.
    > >
    > > He also said that brining is not as well known
    > > here in the US, but I know some BBQ-types
    > > use it.
    > >
    > > ANybody have any experience on brining
    > > meats before cooking?
    > >
    > > Chemiker, who's never used it.

    >
    > I brine bone-in chicken parts before grilling. It adds moisture and
    > allows you to get seasoning all the way down to the bone.


    I don't brine, but I do marinate...
    Question: What is brine but a very salty marinade? :-)
    Is all that extra salt really necessary?
    I have to keep to a low sodium diet.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Any ship can be a minesweeper. Once." -- Anonymous

  18. #18
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I don't brine, but I do marinate...
    >Question: What is brine but a very salty marinade? :-)
    >Is all that extra salt really necessary?
    >I have to keep to a low sodium diet.


    I do not know exactly how much salt ends up in the meat
    after brining/rinsing, but it is significant. Taste wise
    the brined meat is not to the leel of being too salty for
    my taste, and I do object to over-salted food, but it
    is fairly salty.

    I would say one would not bother with brining unless one
    believes it is doing something special to the texture of the meat.
    (With fish, the equation is a bit different, and it can be part
    of a preserving procedure -- brining followed by smoking.)

    Steve

  19. #19
    elaich Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    =?iso-2022-kr?q?=1B=24=29C=0E=22=3E=0F_Horry_=0E=22=3E=0F?=
    <[email protected]> wrote in news:gkl42d$lg4$[email protected]:

    > But here's a short instructional video by a French(-
    > sounding) woman showing how to brine a turkey.
    >


    A French sounding woman named Natasha with a Roosian accent? LOL!

  20. #20
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Brining meats

    In article <9jpbl.13175$[email protected]>,
    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > > Brining is used to help tenderize a tough, but flavorful
    > > piece of meat. It's not a flavoring technique, at least
    > > in its basic form.

    >
    > I've never heard that. It does add moisture through osmosis and adding
    > moisture may make what would otherwise have been a dried out chicken breast
    > or pork chop seem more tender. I've brined many a corned beef and until
    > properly cooked like any other brisket, it is still tough.


    Then you are not cooking it long and slow enough...
    I've never _eaten_ a tough brisket around here!
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Any ship can be a minesweeper. Once." -- Anonymous

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